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animal
12-03-2000, 11:20 PM
I was wondering what colours should be mixed for different skin tones? What colours should be used for the underpainting with the different skin tones?

Beau
12-16-2000, 01:09 PM
Animal...I'm just a newbie but my "Workhorse Miracle Mixture" is

Burnt Sienna
Lemon Yellow Hue
Zinc white

I have a great book with tons of fleshtones in it...I'll transcribe a bit in a day or so.

Ive also got a book "How to Paint Like the Old Masters" by Joseph Sheppard and the underpaintings start with a medium gray with titanium white highlights and dark gray for shadow areas..Hope this helps!

Beau

SueFletcher
12-17-2000, 10:49 AM
Animal,
Your question is quite open ended for me. Always remember basics of color...how they influence each other. Don't think too subjectively, remember how complements (each colors opposite on the color wheel)show each other off. Have fun experimenting to discover what you like. For light skin tones, I use varying mixtures of alizerine crimson,cad red lt.,cad yellow medium, ultramarine blue and white. Any pinkish skin will look great with blueish, greyish, greenish background tones.

kayemme
12-17-2000, 04:12 PM
for underpaintings you want to look at the general hue of the person you are painting...

are they kinda reddish? yellowish? blueish?

use their undertones and your underpainting, then glaze and glaze and glaze some more with (my favorites)

sap green
indian red or
burnt sienna
raw umber
cad yellow light
titanium white (very sparingly)

stick with the earth tones, mostly and you'll be fine, just use thin glazes and really look at the subject.. you'll find that the skin is actually made up of many shades of colour, and the more you exaggerate that, the more realistic it will be (unless way exaggerated).

km

Roan
12-17-2000, 09:00 PM
I have a wonderful book that I just don't use enough (whap whap Roan!). It's called "How to Paint Skin Tones" by James Horton and it covers oil, watercolor, acrylic, gouache, and pastel.

One of the best parts of it are the quick reference charts based on medium and skin tones.

You might want to take a look at that one, animal.

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<FONT face="Script MT Bold"><FONT COLOR="#AB4835"><FONT size="5">Roan</FONT s></FONT c></FONT f>
<FONT COLOR="#8A1010">Nollaig Shona Dhuibh! Merry Christmas!</FONT c>
RoanStudio.com (http://RoanStudio.com) &lt;-- pastel open stock vendor sources & reviews!

Beau
12-18-2000, 03:48 PM
Roan!

Thats one of the booksI have and its wonderful!...I couldnt do without it!

I really recommend this one guys!

Beau

Beau
12-20-2000, 09:14 PM
Kay??....Sap Green for flesh tone underpaintings?...Have you been painting those martians again? http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

Just kidding!

Beau

tonymarzi
12-21-2000, 08:15 PM
I would use a cad yellow deep with some titanium white then use burnt sienna for your shaddows. For the real deep shadows add some burnt umber.
I am no scholar, but it works for me.
I think it looks good.
-tatatatony

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<FONT size="3"> http://www.tonymarzi.com </FONT s>
[email protected]

tammy
01-07-2001, 11:10 PM
I found RH's article to be useful here for some skin tones. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ArtSchool/Portraiture/Palette/index.html

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Tammy-Painter in waiting

alfonsina
01-12-2001, 02:43 AM
I work in layers, so here's how I would approach skin color. I like to work with complementary colors and play with cold/warm combinations. Also,it seems to me that the skin picks up the surrounding colors, so keep that in mind especially in the highlights. I might start with a let's say a reddish ( indian red for expample) underpainting, let it dry then apply a green tone mixed with a touch of white and a bit of yellow and start blocking in the middle value blending all the while and letting some of that red show through, (you can almost imagine the red blood flowing benieth through tiny capillaries.) Then on the lightest areas, back to a reddish/pink tone. This green/red complementary approach can be used with orange and blue. Don't let the two colors mix or you will get mud! I go for bright colors, so this may not be for you.

[This message has been edited by alfonsina (edited January 12, 2001).]

beauxman
01-14-2001, 03:09 PM
I've found that working from cold to warm helps with skin color. A cold, silvery, grey underpainting in the correct values, using blue/black mixed with white. Then I start glazing,very thin, with cooler reds(with or without white), working on out to a very warm red like vermilion. On top that goes the yellow, of which I'm very careful to use sparingly as too much yellow will kill the translucent, transparent effect of what came before. This takes a while to do but the effect is stunning.
Another, simpler approach is to underpaint in a cool green or blue ( both mixed with white) and then when that's dry, color with a mixture of naples/vermilion/white or (even better)lead-tin yellow/vermilion/white letting the cool underpainting for the cooler parts of the flesh come through. I stay away from earth colors as much as possible for skin tones, its easier to get cleaner mixtures without them.

Dudi
01-23-2001, 12:34 AM
I personally think it can be a great help to have a well-established set of skin tone colors, but I read something long ago from my one of my fav. artists, Julie Bell, which I constantly tell myself when painting.

She basically said that it doesn't matter what colors you use to paint skin tone - it'll look real if the relativity of the hue and value between each color is correct - it'll just look as though it's under weird lighting if you get a little too wacky with the colors.

Keith Russell
02-18-2001, 11:48 PM
Greetings:

From a slightly different perspective, the skin tones in my paintings are all created using transparent airbrush colours.

I start with a blend of transparent 'smoke gray' and 'bright red'--a bit more of the red red than the gray. This yields a muddy brown colour which is used to block in the deepest shadows.

Then, I spray straight bright red over the 'middle tone' areas of the skin. The skin tones usually look a nasty purplish colour at this point.

Next, transparent 'bright yellow' is used over the entire skin area, blending with the red to make a nice, peachy glow.

Layers of straight 'bright red' and 'smoke gray' are used to finish up the blending.

As in all aibrush painting, build up the layers of colour slowly--and always paint all the skin of a figure at the same time; getting the exact same blend twice is problemmatic if you forgot to include say, a hand, when you did the rest of a given figure.

Keith.



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Keith Russell
Synthetic Sky Studios
Science Fiction Fine Art
[email protected]

belladonna
04-04-2001, 01:29 PM
Here animal .... check this out .... The artist used a color toner to mix in with all the colors in the painting. One way of doing it http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif
<IMG SRC="http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Apr-2001/tones.jpg" border=0>

belladonna
04-04-2001, 01:36 PM
Here's another way ..... the artist used a green and white underpainting and then used a red glaze over top. Makes for great lights and shadows! <IMG SRC="http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Apr-2001/O_Runge.jpg" border=0>

belladonna
04-04-2001, 01:43 PM
Originally posted by Dudi:
I read something long ago from my one of my fav. artists, Julie Bell, which I constantly tell myself when painting.
She basically said that it doesn't matter what colors you use to paint skin tone - it'll look real if the relativity of the hue and value between each color is correct -

Hey Dudi! I LOVE Julie Bell! http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif Her skin tones are GREAT!

Keith Russell
04-27-2001, 04:14 PM
Greetings:

And Julie learned everything she knows from another master of excellent skin tones, her husband, Boris Vallejo.

Keith.

------------------
Keith Russell
Synthetic Sky Studios
Science Fiction Fine Art
[email protected]
artkc.com/russelk.htm

belladonna
04-28-2001, 03:08 AM
I have there website bookmarked, and I knew he is her teacher, but are Boris and Julie really married ??? If so .... cool http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif http://www.borisjulie.com/

m_a_r_t_i_n
05-04-2001, 06:49 PM
One of my faviourate skin tones is green http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

belladonna
05-06-2001, 02:11 AM
It's not easy being green http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/rolleyes.gif

[This message has been edited by belladonna (edited May 06, 2001).]

Luis Guerreiro
05-25-2001, 02:06 PM
I read all the postings. Sorry but I'm lost here, with skin tones. Where does the final resulting skin tone pick the shadows from? The underpainting? And what ratio of medium to colour do you use? I never tried portrait because I find it really very complicated, but I ma curious to know more.
Thanks
Luis

belladonna
05-26-2001, 11:17 PM
The skin tone shadows are painted in many different ways. In the first group of 4 picts, they are mixed and painted on in a single layer. I do not know if an underpainting or glaze was used in these at all. In the last picture post, you can see the underpainting. The shadows are in the underpainting, as are the lights. There are many ways to paint shadows with oils. I try to keep in mind that warm light makes cool shadows, and cool light makes warm shadows. I like to use gel sometimes, as it makes for a greater feeling of deapth. I do not worry too much about medium ratio as I use a glaze gel medium. Grambacher gel is specifically designed for glazing with oils. You can mix as much or as little color as you need according to the manufacturer. I don't know for sure about proper ratios with other mediums. Probably varies. I don't worry to much about it really. "(from a previous post) Note the lights in the shadows and on the lips and underside of the nose. An under painting of greens and whites was used for the shadows and lights. Then a reddish glaze was overlaid to give depth and luminosity to the skin. Don't let the cracks in the picture scare you. It was found tightly rolled up after many years in an attic!"

I paint thin so even if I am not using gel or glaze the underpainting will come through a bit and affect the final painting. I have used both green and blue underpaintings for skin tones.

JeanineJ
05-28-2001, 08:27 AM
Originally posted by tammy:
I found RH's article to be useful here for some skin tones. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ArtSchool/Portraiture/Palette/index.html



Wonderful reference!



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Jeanine Jackson
Stamford, CT
www.peoplescapesct.com

Keith Russell
05-29-2001, 12:50 AM
Bella:

Yes, Boris and Julie are married.

(It's a bit of a scandal in the art world.)

Julie was a bodybuilder, and modelled for Boris. Boris had been married to a woman named Doris (of all things).

Doris wrote the poetry text to Mirage, Boris' second book of original art, most of it erotic.

My understanding is that he divorced Doris to marry Julie, and that yes, he was her teacher as well.

She paints just like Boris does, only she adds shiny 'metallic' elements to most of her work, while Boris uses such effects sparingly.

I haven't particularly liked Boris' work for several years; the calendars get sillier each year, and his work has gotten so slick, and so derivitive of itself.

Julie, IMO, is just more of the same.

But, Bodies a recent book of some of Boris' model photography, is quite good.

And, both his and Julie's skin tones are as amazing as ever.

Keith.

------------------
Keith Russell
Synthetic Sky Studios
Science Fiction Fine Art
[email protected]
artkc.com/russelk.htm

belladonna
07-11-2001, 11:13 PM
Here is one of Julies that I just love! Check out the reflected lights.

Mario
07-12-2001, 06:42 AM
This is complicated stuff, made even more so. Anyone would be lost reading this, in my opinion. I'll take a shot at the confusion as there seems to be a million ways of doing it and long lists of colors, glazes etc. are of little help. Let's keep it simple and get to a place early where you are not lost.

You can try a raw umber imprimatura. Get the consistency right (not too wet, not too sticky), wipe out the highlights, midtones, leave the darks in tact. Go in with opaque titanium white (or lead) and transparent red oxide for the highlights as a starter, keep the shadows always of the same value, don't lighten them, better yet, dont touch them. Add burnt sienna, ivory black (blue) and yellow ochre to your pallette.
Did the above sound a little confusing? Are there things that you don't understand? My advice is:
You simply have to go to an art class in portraiture that is taught by a good instructor. Anything else will waste a lot of time.

belladonna
07-12-2001, 12:59 PM
O.K. I will try to simplify things for you... I used sap green, white, and burnt umber for this under painting. I do not recommend the use of sap green. It is not very permanent but I did not know that at the time. Another green would do. I chose green because it complements her reddish hair and completion. I use blue for skin tones when the model has dark hair and pale completion as in my painting of the 'Lady and the Dragon'. See thread:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=10711&perpage=15&pagenumber=1

Keep in mind that nothing is written in stone and experimenting with the colors will make you more comfortable with them in the long run..... This is an important quote!

quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by Dudi:
I read something long ago from my one of my fav. artists, Julie Bell, which I constantly tell myself when painting.
She basically said that it doesn't matter what colors you use to paint skin tone - it'll look real if the relativity of the hue and value between each color is correct -
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

belladonna
07-12-2001, 01:19 PM
Now... here is the finished painting. It is an older painting and the mouth is not the best, but the tones around the nose are very nice. The green made for nice shadows. This was my first try at this type of under painting, and I am showing you this one because I took the picture of the green under painting for a lecture I was giving on oil painting. I used mixes of red, yellow, white and umber this time. (umber for her lashes and eyes, the darks in her hair and hat etc). I let the greens show through in the shadows, but I used less glaze than O.Runge did in his painting (see earlier post in this thread.)

belladonna
07-12-2001, 01:21 PM
I have never taken a class in oil painting, other than high school art, and I have never taken a class in portraiture. Perhaps it shows *lol*, but you can learn some on your own. It helps to know the basic rules before you start breaking them though :D Heres a detail of the eye and nose area.

Wally's Mom
07-12-2001, 02:25 PM
Wow !

I really like her !

Thank you for posting the 2 views (underpainting and finished painting). I was intrigued recently by an article on "griselle" (sp ?), and thought it would be interesting to try sometime. Your underpainting makes re-awakened my desire to try an undrpainting sometime. Probably not soon though, right now I'm working my way through the excercises in Nita Leland's Exploring Color , and I have an unfinished Great Blue Heron under my dining room table.:rolleyes:

belladonna
07-13-2001, 03:02 AM
Originally posted by Wally's Mom
I have an unfinished Great Blue Heron under my dining room table.:rolleyes:

hehehe :D I have an unfinished dragon in my closet :eek:

Reye
07-26-2001, 09:30 AM
Wally's Mom...you must have the same table as mine..I have one under my table as well...still trying to get it right!!

Bella...I do not know what you have not done..but I really like what you DO!!
Jerry:D :D :cool:

belladonna
07-26-2001, 12:11 PM
Thankyou Reye. I like to paint :D

aaasp
09-11-2001, 12:41 PM
Try Pozzuoli Earth & Terre Verte as the basic mix, adding cadmium yellow, yellow ochre or Cobalt Blue, depending on the values you need. And White of course.
You need to play around with it for a while.

Mario
09-19-2001, 07:30 AM
Hi aaasp, what brands make these two colors? And is Pozz. earth a sort of red? What other color is it close to? And terre verte which other green is closest to it? many thanks

Painter
10-13-2001, 01:31 AM
And here I thought that all I needed was Grumbacher Flesh color. Sigh

Pilan
10-17-2001, 12:56 PM
Kayemme,

Recently, I have started to think in terms of overall hue for whatever I maybe painting. But, now that you have addressed the skin tone, I will go and try to finish a painting of my daughter. Thank you for posting this information.

Pilan

Originally posted by kayemme
for underpaintings you want to look at the general hue of the person you are painting...

are they kinda reddish? yellowish? blueish?

use their undertones and your underpainting, then glaze and glaze and glaze some more with (my favorites)

sap green
indian red or
burnt sienna
raw umber
cad yellow light
titanium white (very sparingly)

stick with the earth tones, mostly and you'll be fine, just use thin glazes and really look at the subject.. you'll find that the skin is actually made up of many shades of colour, and the more you exaggerate that, the more realistic it will be (unless way exaggerated).

km

donseeg
11-02-2001, 09:34 PM
http://www.seegmiller-art.com/skin.htm

just a couple of my ideas

Don

Mario
11-03-2001, 07:22 AM
Hi Donseeg, it's great to have another teacher with us! I am in the midst of enjoying your website right now and I'm writing this because I cannot contain my enthusiasm.
I wish that the background color of your pages was not grey nor any simular value as I lose some of the letters and it is difficult to print.
Many thanks and I am looking forward to your future contributions here. Where else have you been posting? :cool:

donseeg
11-04-2001, 12:43 AM
Thanks for your very kind words. I will work on getting something that is easier to read and print.

I post in a couple of other forums but really and hit and miss. When I get busy it can be several weeks before I post anything.

Thanks Again
Don