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llis
03-11-2001, 01:26 PM
Thought I would share this with everyone.....


"At any time of the day, as we look into the distance, yellow are also the first colors to be filtered out by the atmosphere. Reds go next, blues last of all. That's why green hills and moutains march off to the horizon as purples and blues, and finally as fading grays way out yonder." ... Harley Brown

Just wondering if anyone could add more bits of wisdom (from yourself, or others) to this thread?

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Phy...llis Franklin
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kayemme
03-11-2001, 09:06 PM
yeah,

i noticed that just before dusk all the cast shadows are colour compliments of the object that is being lit.

k

Patrick1
03-11-2001, 09:17 PM
I was wondering why distant hills/mountains are purplish. I just couldn't think of any explanation. Blue I could understand, but purple I couldn't figure out...until the explanation you just
posted.

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TPS
03-17-2001, 01:55 PM
All light has a color cast to it. What I call ambient color. When painting something, decide what the ambient color is, then mix some of this with your white paint before you begin. When tinting or "lightening" a color, you will automatically be adding the ambient color of the light. This will help to bring unity to the painting, and help avoid the chalkiness that results when using pure white.

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http://www.artbydj.com

alva
05-19-2001, 09:57 PM
A major tip, one that most ignore, is to work in monochrome until they have a good command of values and paint modeling. Then they should use a limited palette. I think about 75% of painters haven't learned the fundamentals before going on...it hinders their skills for the rest of their career.

Phyllis Franklin
05-20-2001, 12:10 AM
I really like your last tip TPS, Thanks!

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Phy...llis Franklin
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Michael Hodgkins
05-23-2001, 09:34 AM
You guys are talking about rendering "atmomosperic perspective", also called "aerial perspective". This is really basic 'first lessons for beginning landscape painters' territory.

So, for those to whom the whole concept is new, I would suggest backtracking a bit and getting this foundation stuff in your skill set.

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If a carpenter can't call a woodplane a "chest of drawers" . . .
and a choreographer can't call a bare stage a "Ballet" . . .
nor a composer call a piano a "symphony" . . .
how can an 'artist' call a bare canvas an "artwork" ? ? ?

Verdaccio
05-23-2001, 11:04 AM
Originally posted by Michael Hodgkins:
You guys are talking about rendering "atmomosperic perspective", also called "aerial perspective".

"We see the world through veils of gray atmosphere."

This applies not only in landscapes, but in portraiture and other kinds of painting as well. If you just duplicate the photo, or just what you see, your painting will be wrong.

Dark objects at a distance appear lighter and grayer, lighter objects at a distance appear darker and grayer.

Dark green mountains get lighter and grayer. White snow on peaks gets darker and grayer.

This also applies to the farther pupil in the eye of a 3/4 view of your portrait, the hindquarters of a horse standing 3/4 on, distant trees, etc. Add increasingly more gray to objects as they recede and it will make a difference in your painting.



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Michael Georges
www.fineportraitsinoil.com (http://www.fineportraitsinoil.com)

belladonna
05-23-2001, 01:36 PM
Verdaccio, your site needs a guest book. I stopped in and wanted to say something nice about your work. Your tonal values are wonderful! Have ever tried different colors for the under painting? I like to under paint with greens, but I sometimes use only blues instead, or reds, or browns, or greys depending on the subject. Blue under painting works great for pale skinned redheads, and the red works wonders for sunset landscapes. (It makes a nice warm cohesive tone) The brown, under paintings I use for darker moody pictures, and greys for lighter paintings. Then again, sometimes I just go for the local color complement of the subject, and the under painting has several colors. Why do you limit yourself by using just greens? I am not knocking your choice, it works very well for you, I just want to understand your reasoning.
Also, what kind of medium do you use? Sir Thomas is coming along wonderfully!

Verdaccio
05-23-2001, 03:10 PM
Originally posted by belladonna:
Verdaccio, your site needs a guest book. I stopped in and wanted to say something nice about your work. Your tonal values are wonderful! Have ever tried different colors for the under painting? I like to under paint with greens, but I sometimes use only blues instead, or reds, or browns, or greys depending on the subject. Blue under painting works great for pale skinned redheads, and the red works wonders for sunset landscapes. (It makes a nice warm cohesive tone) The brown, under paintings I use for darker moody pictures, and greys for lighter paintings. Then again, sometimes I just go for the local color complement of the subject, and the under painting has several colors. Why do you limit yourself by using just greens? I am not knocking your choice, it works very well for you, I just want to understand your reasoning.
Also, what kind of medium do you use? Sir Thomas is coming along wonderfully!

Hey thanks for the kind words about my work! http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

I do Verdaccio underpaintings mostly because it is the way I have been taught, and because I paint mostly people. That gray-green undertone works wonders on flesh. You let it show through - like in the halftone between a shadow and a highlight. That cool tone next to the warm skin tones really creates a vibrancy in flesh.

As for my medium, I use the following:

5 parts Damar Varnish
5 parts Rectified (Distilled) Turpentine
3 parts Stand Oil
1 part Venice Turpentine

I love it... http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

BTW: Thomas More is done! Look for a shot of the completed painting on the website this evening!



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Michael Georges
www.fineportraitsinoil.com (http://www.fineportraitsinoil.com)

belladonna
05-23-2001, 05:16 PM
Please forgive my stupid questions, but, I am self taught in oils and I am curious. I have always used pre mixed mediums, (Grumbacher oil medium #1), and have been thinking of late, that, perhaps this is not the best thing to do. What is the difference between rectified(Distilled) turpentine, and venice turpentine? Do you find your medium effects the colors/paint in any way over time?
(I will make a point of looking at Thomas later tonight as I have to go out.)

Verdaccio
05-23-2001, 07:45 PM
Originally posted by belladonna:
What is the difference between rectified(Distilled) turpentine, and venice turpentine? Do you find your medium effects the colors/paint in any way over time?

No such thing as a stupid question. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

Rectified turpentine has been distilled - this pulls the gum and by-product resins out of it. Pure Gum Spirits of Turpentine darkens over time - Distilled or Rectified Turp will darken much, much, less.

Venice Turpentine is a resin from the larch tree. It is heated with turpentine and creates a thick amber colored liquid - you can buy it in most art stores.

As for the permanence of this medium, it has been reviewed by Artist's Magazine - I have not seen the article, but I understand it was favorable. Further, it is the medium of my teacher, Frank Covino. Frank is a classically trained portrait artist who studied with Frank Rielly and Norman Rockwell - he knows his stuff and says this medium is close to and possibly better (because of Damar) to what many renaissance painters used. I love the stuff. It imparts a high gloss, and is dry to the touch in two to three days. I expect my paintings to look as good three hundred years from now as they do today - depending on their care after I croak of course. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif



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Michael Georges
www.fineportraitsinoil.com (http://www.fineportraitsinoil.com)

belladonna
05-23-2001, 09:43 PM
I just sent a friend to look at the under painting for Thomas, and it was gone!!! *lol* oh well. He worked up beautifully. Bravo! As for the turps question ..... Thank you http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

LarrySeiler
05-27-2001, 12:35 AM
I don't remember if it was Paul Strisik or Kevin MacPherson....but I have been using this technique and teaching it. Especially painting outdoors.

When judging a color...you'll see one thing looking directly at the mass or object, but perceive a subtle variation looking elsewhere. I now try to peripherally "sense" the color I see by looking at adjacent areas. For example...I'll judge the color of the sky not by looking at the sky, but by looking at the mass of trees. I'll judge the color of a shadow by looking an an adjacent area lit up in color....or the dominant color lit up by looking at the area of shadows.

This brings out a better sense of the complimentaries and dynamics of light, and tends to pull all objects together as they contribute to the whole.

I've seen it definitely work. Just the other day I noticed a low cloud formation have this neat grayish purple, until I looked directly at it. Then it appear bluer and gray. I'd look aside adjacent...and the sense of purple would reveal itself, straight at it again...and the purple disappeared looking bluer.

As a result...I've noticed my eyes becoming more sensitive to color in general.

Larry

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The "Artsmentor"
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"Painting is easy when you don't know how, but very difficult when you do!" Edgar Degas

sarkana
05-28-2001, 12:54 AM
i would add that the distance thing works even when painting still lifes or portraits (or abstractions or car crashes, etc). in general, warm colors approach the picture plane and cool colors recede. or, to put it another way, reds look closer and blues look farther away. also, reds and yellows always look lit while blues usually seem shadowed.. of course these are flexible rules, but try paitnign a yellow shadow or get red to seem like its in the distance and you'll see what i mean! deliberately violating these rules can result in interesting dechirico-esque effects...

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