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rebob
12-03-2001, 11:45 PM
Hope someone can give me a easy-to-understand, concise answer to this question.

What is exactly "Painterly Techniques", or just simply "Painterly"? We hear and read this word used quite a bit and I can find no real definition of it. I did a search at

http://painting.about.com/library/bl101.htm?once=true&

and came up with something like 284 different references!!

Help!

Bob

Verdaccio
12-03-2001, 11:52 PM
When a work or an artists style is described as "painterly", then to me it means that there are visible brush strokes, possibly fat impasto passages, and a real sense that this is a painting, not a photograph. The degree of "painterly" style varies from artist to artist. Some just brush against painterly to make their works look more painted than photorealistic, others slap it on with a trowel.

Titanium
12-04-2001, 06:39 AM
Painterly - hmmm ,

drawing directly on the canvas with brush and
paint . Responding to the textures of reality
with paint as in , impasto , glazes , scumbles , etc.

Normally , no tightly drawn image would be present.
Instead , mass or light and shadow patterns as the
underpainting , nothing linear , giving a greater
effect of life.

Examples - Titian or Rembrandt or Velasquez.

Venetian work versus Florentine .

Sometimes the home of the great colourists.

Titian was the first real painter.
Titanium

vallarta
12-05-2001, 07:33 PM
It's a very subjective term. Often two people will disagree on what is/is not painterly. It's like good sex, you know it when you get it!! hehehe
vallarta

Mario
12-05-2001, 08:40 PM
Normally , no tightly drawn image would be present. Instead , mass or light and shadow patterns as the underpainting , nothing linear , giving a greater effect of life. Venice as distiguished from Florence

That says a lot..