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View Full Version : Leonardo's pigments ?


antonio
11-29-2001, 01:25 PM
I'm curious as to what pigments Leonardo, Raphael , Michelangelo et al used.
Most books state earth pigments so i assume the following:
Please comment if your info is different.

White : Lead for oil painting , Bianco SanGiovanni (dried slaked lime) for fresco and/or egg tempera.

Yellow : Ochre ?

Red : Ochre .....did they use another red ? perhaps vermillion? or some lake color ?

Orange : they mixed the above two ?

Blue : Lapis Lazuli ......did they use Azurite or some other blue
also?

Green : Terre Verte (green earth) ...was used for tempera and perhaps oil but there had to be another more brilliant green because the sistine fresco greens are much more brilliant green.
Did they use a mixture of yellow ochre with lapis lazuli ?.....was malachite used? or was there another green ?

Purple : Red Ochre mixed with Lapis Lazuli ? or Red Ochre heated to a purplish hue ?

Brown : Burnt Siena ?

Black : Bone or Lamp Black ?

Is anyone aware of any other pigments these artists used ?

Thank You for your help..............antonio

paintfool
12-03-2001, 02:14 PM
Since i really don't have any info on this subject i thought i'd bring this back to the top. Hope someone knows.
Cheryl

Scott Methvin
12-05-2001, 09:42 PM
Real Naples yellow
Real vermillion
Real ultramarine (lapis)
Real lead white
Most of the natural ores we still use today.

Kremer sells most of the historic pigments.

The modern colors are better in a lot of ways.

Leonardo's last supper started falling apart right after he finished it.

Raphael's style changed every month.

Michelangelo was more interested in sculpting than he was painting.

Have you met our friend Shawn, from Canada?

He has tried all the greatest hits, including red cochneal bugs.

impressionist2
12-06-2001, 07:09 AM
Antonio, Here's the page with images in color of Leonardo's pigments:

http://painting.about.com/library/weekly/aa041600a.htm

Sometimes the links don't work here. There is a way to adjust them to make them work. Does anyone know how?

If not, go to www.about.com and do a search through their library.

Renee