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agaban
01-09-2005, 01:59 PM
I enjoy painting but feel my work is childish. I cannot seem to find depth or definition in the trees. Any comments or criticisms would be greatly appreciated.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jan-2005/54879-land2.jpg

laketrees
01-09-2005, 06:11 PM
I would call this work spontaneous. You've really captured the mood and I feel tempted to go and sit under one of those trees! Perhaps you could use more different shades of green in the leaves and brown in the trunks to give some depth. I really like the composition.
ps. light colours advance - dark colours recede
Cheers Kim

agaban
01-10-2005, 11:09 AM
Thank you laketrees for taking the time to make a comment and suggestion. I guess from everyone else's silence my work is childish and not meant to be on this site.

Mikey
01-10-2005, 05:13 PM
Thank you laketrees for taking the time to make a comment and suggestion. I guess from everyone else's silence my work is childish and not meant to be on this site.

Agaban, we want you to feel welcome, because it's possible to learn a lot here and get encouragement. I know very little about watercolours, any way I going to assume because you have posted here you want to progress as an artist. If you do, I suggest the first step is get some pencils, copy paper and draw everything around you in the house. Painting is really only drawing with a brush after all.

Mikey

A Few Pigments
01-10-2005, 06:13 PM
:) Welcome agaban. Everyone’s work is welcome on WC. I wouldn’t call your painting childish. It’s just a simplification of real objects and that’s a valid way of representing the world around you. It has a long and noble tradition in art.

I don’t know anything about your knowledge of art so I’ll just say I agree with Mikey’s advice to you. Draw as much as you can, read books on drawing and painting. One book I’d recommend on watercolor is Making Color Sing by Jeanne Dobie. And if you haven’t already checked out the Watercolor Forum have a look at it. You'll find many helpfull people there. http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=11

Good luck with your art. :)

shirleyq
01-10-2005, 06:33 PM
I have painted with watercolors some but not much but painting trees in any medium is similar. :) First there are no sky holes in your trees......you should be able to see small bits of sky here and there through the leaves. Also leaves are never one color so mix it up a bit and put some highlights in.....yellows, pale greens, etc. There should be leaves covering parts of the branches that go through the leaves.
Trunks of trees can have purples, blues, oranges, as well as browns. This makes your painting look more alive.
The trees in the background should be greyer to make them appear in the distance.........use a gray green for this,........a mix of red and green would work.
Last - watercolor is beautiful because it is transparent so use less paint and try to paint in layers.....more water, less paint. :)
You have used trees with different size trunks and that helps make a good composition. Your grasses are done well but using yellows there suggests autumn and your trees are green as in spring or summer.
Keep painting :D We all have to start somewhere. :) You are to be commended for posting and wanting to learn...........and BTW Welcome!! :)

Spyderbabe
01-10-2005, 07:40 PM
Thank you laketrees for taking the time to make a comment and suggestion. I guess from everyone else's silence my work is childish and not meant to be on this site.

Hi Nancy - the website had a lot of outages the past 12 hours - whole network was down. Don't take it personally :D
How long have you been working in wc? I use to do wc and it's tricky - there are so many variables - the type of paper, the paint used, the amount of water, the humidity in the air.
I wouldn't cal anything childish. Don't worry about putting a label on your work,the only important thing is that you do it!
Will be looking for your next one tomorrow!
Kathleen

agaban
01-10-2005, 08:08 PM
I chose wc pencils because I did not want to make a large investment but I think the medium is much more difficult than I thought. Maybe I should try another medium that is easier to control. Thanks for the encouraging words and I apologize to everyone, I had a bad day and took it out on the wrong people. Any ideas on mediums, which may be easier to work with? I was thinking oils or water-based oils.

Mikey
01-10-2005, 08:14 PM
I find acrylics to be a lot easier in use than oils myself. They are also very flexible as it's possible to use them like watercolours on paper and like oils on canvas.

Mikey

Quiet
01-10-2005, 08:38 PM
I guess from everyone else's silence my work is childish and not meant to be on this site.

No, no no! :-) Sometimes, the folks here just aren’t a font of info. It doesn’t mean that your work is “childish”. I take it that you are new to watercolors? As with any undertaking, you have to start at the beginning. And you have made a good start. I’m lousy with watercolors myself, but I can give you some general advice for tackling any medium:

Work from life as much as you can without feeling like “bleah, not ANOTHER still-life!”. Drawing/painting/sculpting from life is by far the best way to learn how to see and how to reproduce what you see.

Don’t be afraid to mess up what you’ve done. Screw it up brazenly, learn from it, throw it away, and carry what you’ve learned to the next one. (I have gone through many sketchbooks this way, and my trail of horrible work has led me to wonderful places.)

Come check out the Painting a Day thread in my signature. ;-)

(I’d say more but I need to get back to work.)

dcorc
01-10-2005, 10:50 PM
Thank you laketrees for taking the time to make a comment and suggestion. I guess from everyone else's silence my work is childish and not meant to be on this site.

wow - hang on a minute :) You're very welcome here! I think watercolour is tricky - it's very tempting to go directly for strong colours, but it's a technique which really requires quite a bit of planning, as one keeps the lightest areas by not painting on them (There's a survey in one of the forums where a strong consensus was reached that watercolour is the trickiest technique to master!)

I'd suggest acrylics or oils as being better suited to beginning explorations, as you can just keep pushing the paint around until it looks right, and then stop :p - you don't need vast amounts of supplies - get a small starter box composed of just half-a-dozen tubes - these are not expensive.

Look at the light in your scene (its colour, and its direction) - don't think in terms of "leaves are green" - look at how the light is hitting things, and paint that, not the objects themselves :)

Dave

Quiet
01-11-2005, 11:46 AM
I'd suggest acrylics or oils as being better suited to beginning explorations,

If you want to learn to play the piano, don't start by playing the clarinet.

agaban
01-11-2005, 04:31 PM
Thanks for the invite, I'll be there.

dcorc
01-11-2005, 05:09 PM
I'd suggest acrylics or oils as being better suited to beginning explorations,
If you want to learn to play the piano, don't start by playing the clarinet.

from post #8, above:

Any ideas on mediums, which may be easier to work with? I was thinking oils or water-based oils.

:)

Dave

bobb thg
01-12-2005, 12:27 AM
Your work reminds of me,a few years ago.I feel ha you have a very good eye and a natural sense for color,keep at it.Watercolor is all about stating and restating,not unlike writing.Good luck and stay with it. :clap:

Quiet
01-12-2005, 09:53 AM
from post #8, above:


Oops! My bad! :-)

Thanks for the invite, I'll be there.

Woot!

agaban
01-13-2005, 01:02 PM
bobb thg - would love to see some of your work, earlier and today's. Thanks for the comments.

stgault
01-13-2005, 04:06 PM
Agaban,

I've been doing watercolor for a number of years now and having also used acrylic and oil can attest to its trickiness. When I first started I bought a book by Jim Kosvanec called "Transparent Watercolor Wheel" (see it here (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0823054373/qid=1105648320/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/002-5016692-6479260?v=glance&s=books) ). It helped immensely with understanding color mixing and the different properties of various paints. Avoiding muddy color mixes is one of the major tricks of watercolor and this book helps with that (not that I noticed any muddy mixes in your work posted here).

My first painting course in college required the use of acrylics on watercolor paper. The palette was limited to Viridian Green, Cadmium Red Medium and Cadmium Yellow Light. It's enlightening to discover the large range of colors you can create with only three tubes of primary colored paint! Plus, no large investment needed to get started with a new medium.

Using acrylics on wc paper can be very similar to using wc in the way you plan a painting and build up layers from light to dark values. But it's very different due to the permanent nature of acrylics, once dry they can't be readily adjusted except to add another layer over top. This is good in that it alleviates muddiness by keeping underlayers of pigment from inadvertently mixing with overlayers of incompatible colors. However, if you decide to lighten a particular area of the painting you pretty much have to use white paint rather than lifting off the color after wetting the paper in that area (as you would with wc). BTW, wc papers with more sizing (like Imperial) are easier to lift color off of than those with less sizing.

Of course, acrylics are also versatile since they work equally well on canvas as on paper.

Good brushes are a must for any kind of painting, but I think especially with water based media.

I don't know if any of my own experiences listed here are helpful to you, but there they are nonetheless.

agaban
01-13-2005, 04:29 PM
Stgault - wow, yes you have been a big help. Thanks for the thoughts and ideas, I will definitely check into your suggestions.

Lilypat
11-02-2007, 01:02 PM
:wave: Hi! :thumbsup: Don't give up. Lots of people new to art think that watercolor looks like an easy place to start but I think it's the hardest type of painting to learn. You really have to plan ahead with it because it's so transparent. Start with light colors and then build up your darks slowly. I have used watercolor paints and pencils and I like both but for different reasons. I like to use the watercolor paints to paint the main painting and then use the pencils for finishing touches and details. They both give a totally different effect. If you want to try the paints and don't want to spend a lot try a pan set of watercolors. They have student grade paints that are a little cheaper too. I also agree with everyone who told you drawing is very important in any kind of art but especially in watercolor. The more you do the better you'll get so keep painting and have fun learning!:clap: Lilypat

Corby
11-03-2007, 06:07 PM
Each must find his own and then be true to what he is. I have done and sold many watercolors...but my love is oil, my heart beats when I paint in oil. It does not when I paint in watercolor. Acrylics are much loved by many and I am sure that is proper. All I have ever been able to do with them however, is kill brushes... I am thinking because of the ease of clean up that water miscible oil has it would be ideal for you.

As for this picture and its being childish...it is that in the sense that it would appeal to a child. When I first looked at it I thought what a marvelous talent for illustrating childrens books. So to me judgment does not hang on this picture . Its not what you have painted but what you want to paint that matters Find the medium that suits your heart, decide what your goal is style wise ( this can take some time) and paint, and paint and paint. The joy is not in anything but the painting.

martinet
11-08-2007, 12:05 AM
I have been painting in watercolour for a few years now and still have trouble with trees! One thing I have to say though, DON'T GIVE UP! as it is a wonderful medium. I usually start by wetting the area and then drop in some yellow,then add some various shades of green. I also take into consideration the source of light so that some areas will be lighter and others will be darker as they are in shadow. Also,I leave some holes so that the sky shows through. I use these holes to weave through some branches. When I paint
a forest, or groups of trees, I try not to make all my trunks the same size or on the same plane (I put some behind and some in front). There are different techniques that some artists use such as a spray bottle or even sea sponges to make clumps of leaves. There are some good books explaining these techniques. Good luck and have fun!

lhoxie
11-14-2007, 03:22 PM
agaban,

Your work reminds me of mine too. I've attached a koala and a outdoor scene of when I first picked up watercolors. (Both very childlike and flat) And then a painting of a frog, and a cheetah I did...both done later with more time spent on them...more layers of paint, etc.

Hopefully you can see some improvement between my first work and my later work....and also the similiarities between your first work and mine. We all have to start somewhere.

This sight has been wonderful for me to learn from everyone.

I sure hope you don't give up, and keep learning...if you love painting, please by all means paint!

lhoxie