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View Full Version : Is it possible to have too MANY pastels???


Khadres
01-02-2005, 06:43 PM
OK, don't get me wrong! I love each and every stick of my dusties and wouldn't DREAM of returning or getting rid of any of them, but that's just the problem...there is noooooo way I can have them out all at one time and if I can't have access to them when I paint, what use are they???

So what technique do y'all use for spreading out your full palette of colours...or do you rotate portions with each painting or....? Right now I estimate that I have well over 2000 pastels of one sort or another, not counting pencils! How'd I accumulate so many...well...it's easy when you love colours as much as I do...they make my mouth water almost and I cannot resist just one more blue or green or....well, you get the idea. Thing is, each and every one of them has a use somewhere sometime and keeping the bulk of them shut up in cases, etc. has turned out to be counterproductive.

Just thought I'd ask and see how the rest of you get the good out of your full gamut of pastels. Outside of building a rather large chest of drawers specifically sized for pastels and maybe sorting the drawers by hue, I can't think of anything to do and even if I did that, seeing the contents of all drawers at one time would be difficult.

ExpressiveAngie
01-02-2005, 09:54 PM
thats the problem I want with my pastels :clap:

Seriously I cannot imagine how to have them all accesible unless you have a really huge sorta U shaped area. Hmmm, you should send me some then there are no worries huh? :clap:

lindadavis
01-02-2005, 10:04 PM
I have no where near the number that you do, but I do have a handful of sets. Right now I keep them separated by hardness. I start with the harder pastels, then put those away and pull out the mediums, then the softies, etc. I don't know what I'd do if I had over a thousand though. I hope to have that many someday.

SweetBabyJ
01-02-2005, 10:15 PM
ummm... Sooz, don't get me wrong, I'd have one of each colour, each value, of each manufacturer if I could, but....

It isn't the space or storage that stops me, it's knowing such largesse is a crutch which ends up crippling you.

Yeah, they're all pretty; yeah, they're all individually useful someplace, sometime. But you DON'T NEED THEM ALL! Honest. Even in the most complex, colourful piece I've done, I doubt I've used more than a dozen- dozen and a half tops, different hues and values in any one painting. It's no wonder you agonize over a piece- you have far too many choices. Make yourself up a smaller kit (look at it this way- you get to buy a new container apparatus) of a couple values of the primary and secondary hues, add in a couple of nice browns and grays, and learn to use them together- learn to manipulate them to make ANY colour, any value. Once you learn that, you'll be able to use ANY colour, in ANY way- honest. You'll know how to make purple look like green, and yellow look like red. But I think having too many colours is like blending- you spend so much time and effort making one little area perfectly smoothly blended, anything new you lay down looks too raw and wrong- and so you have to blend again and again. Same with too many colours: If you cannot make a limited palette of primaries and secondaries work, how do you expect to ever be able to manipulate thousands of colours?!?

Maybe try it as one of your goals: A palette of no more than 3 dozen hues and values, and 10 paintings done from just those. See if that helps your quandry.

CarlyHardy
01-02-2005, 10:38 PM
I did this last year. Took out all my soft pastels and a large white piece of Canson to test each one. Started out with laying colors obviously not the same into different areas...then began checking the ones that looked a lot alike to see how many of the 'same' colors I had. Just taking out the duplicates decreased the count by a lot.

Then I began to test by values so that I didn't have some so close in the same shades...this also decreased them a bit.

Then I sorted out all the earth colors that I absolutely knew I would not use :D and these went into another pile.

By the time I completed my task, I had several small plastic drawers full of extra colors, earth colors, colors too close in value, and other things...like metallic colors, etc. sorted out of my "usable" sticks.

Made it much easier for working without all the 'extras' interfering with my choices.

On the other hand, if you can't live without all of the thousands of sticks surrounding you, then consider some 4 foot fold up tables and place them either side of the easel.
carly

t-sue
01-02-2005, 11:53 PM
I WANT THIS PROBLEM!!!!! :D

I also want to be able to say "Where am I going to store this huge mass of Wallis?"

Since neither of these problems is immenant, I should be quite content, right? No problems? :crying:

But I will watch this thread and drool and learn what to do should either of these problems arise at my house... :eek: I can't believe I sit here on the second day of the new year actually looking, naye, praying for problems!! :D

Kitty Wallis
01-03-2005, 01:30 AM
Julie and Carly have given you good advice.
I have thousands of pastels also, and I know I have lots of duplicates that get in the way. Because I found a way of organizing them, that makes thousands of colors accessible I haven't bitten the bullet and done the sorting job Carly talks about. I have thought of it, and put it off. ;)

My organization:
I have a small parts shelf unit, about 4'x4', 6 shelves, room for 8 bins on each shelf = 48 bins. the top shelf is 8 bins of different families of greens, from dead leaf greens thru gold greens, yellow greens, apple greens, dark myrtle greens, to darkest olive greens. Some split in values, two bins to a family.

Next shelf is blues, from ultramarine to turquoise... and so on thru violet, purple, fuscia, red, orange, yellow, to earth tones on the bottom shelf, since I hardly ever use them..

When I want a color, I can take out the right bin and find it among all the related colors of that family. This means no more slots, no colors carefully kept out of contact from all other colors, a real jumble in every bin. I love it.

K Taylor-Green
01-03-2005, 01:52 AM
It is hard to make a choice, when you have too many choices. You agonize, think about, and spend way too much time playing with colors instead of painting with them. That said, it is hard not to collect colors just for the sake of having colors. I think that once you have your style down, your prevalent subject matter down, weed out what you know you will not use.
I paint animals. I don't need aqua, turquoise, pale rose. Once you know those things about yourself, only collect what you need. The same colors in different brands are ok, you need to know which brands flow for you.
I don't have more than I can hold on the top of my microwave cart that serves as my pastel table.

khourianya
01-03-2005, 01:57 AM
I don't have your problem quite yet, since I still only have what will fit in my large tacklebox drawers. Of course, you were right, Sooz, way back when, when you said I would run out of room quickly - i can see it happening sometime in the very near future.

Have you considered setting youself up with a studio set, a plein air kit, and a workshop kit? You could go through your pastels and figure out which colours are twins (or triplets or quadruplets) and split them into sets. then, if you have extra duplicates left over, devise some sort of drawer system to house these for when you might need to replace any of your sets.

A Few Pigments
01-03-2005, 02:08 AM
Is it possible to have too MANY pastels???

Yes.

Khadres
01-03-2005, 10:29 AM
Is it possible to have too MANY pastels???

Yes.

Methinks this is the answer I knew was right! :D

Well, actually, I've already tried pretty much all your ideas to one extent or another and no, I don't try to use 'em all the same time....never been able to figure out how I'd do it. But I HAVE thought what fun it would be sometime to just see 'em all out there at once...what largesse!

As to how one can have so many...it's easy...if you have the full set of Rembrandts (a Xmas gift from last year), the full set of Art Spectrums (birthday), the full set of NuPastels (have had those forever), Polychromos, and Blockx, you've already pushing a thousand and the prices on the whole sets of those are so much better than individual sticks, it's very tempting to have them...which I do. Add to those a couple hundred each of Great Americans, Senneliers, and Unisons, plus a hundred or so Ludwigs and there you have it. Obviously there are duplicates in hue and value in there...there would have to be, but often, I pick for softness as much as color and they're all slightly different in that regard.

I have a Cassatt kit full for take-somewhere use and it alone would suffice, but invariably there's a value I'd just love to have at my fingertips. I know I have it...somewhere...but what a hassle to find it. Yeah, yeah, I'm not a total idiot (just semi-), I can, and do, do without it, but I like the idea of putting what I have to use, too.

I think Carly's idea of sorting out the duplicates of the same softness, is good though...that would definitely help. And Kate's plan of leaving colors she just never uses off the table makes sense, too; I don't use a lot of red/pink or earth colors either. I haven't actually used many yellows either although I love collecting them...they kinda gladden the soul somehow even if they just sit there!

But my usual gambit, so far, is to decide on my usually quite limited palette for each painting and then dig out the appropriate colors from all the drawers, boxes, etc. and work with those. This works okay, but as I pick them out I can't help but glance at the other sticks and marvel at their beauty. It's part of what I love about pastels...the vast array of rich, gem-like colors, a kind of treasure trove that makes me smile. Also...there is nothing worse than having only the wrong green...one could easily have a million of those and still not have the right one!

For newbies, which I'm still considering myself, it's a good thing to experiment, as well. Since I only have hands-on access to Senneliers and Rembrandts here in town, it's a bit hit or miss choosing the colors online. Still, I've already learned that Art Spectrums, for instance, have problems with hardness/smoothness, but they also have THE most luscious blues and blue violets. Blockx has the yummiest mid-range colors, Great Americans just have some colors no one else does, as does Unison, and the Ludwigs are in a class by themselves -- Terry's comes very, very close to having the "right" greens.

I suspect SBJ's right in that having them all in view at once might actually be stifling to the paint impulse, but would be such fun, just for awhile, to spread 'em all out and bask in the glow!

t-sue
01-03-2005, 12:29 PM
Another chiming in from OWDKB....“one who doesn’t know beans”-----------

Okay, so my previous post was meant to be humorous... I DO actually appreciate the use of a limited palette. But, like Sooz:

I can't help but glance at the other sticks and marvel at their beauty. It's part of what I love about pastels...the vast array of rich, gem-like colors, a kind of treasure trove that makes me smile. Also...there is nothing worse than having only the wrong green...one could easily have a million of those and still not have the right one!

Coming at this as a newbie, I find it so frustrating to reach for a color for a subtle change and not have it there! If you have 8 or 10 little blobs of watercolor or oil on your palette, you have a gazillion hues and values at your fingertips to work from! Need just a tiny bit lighter or darker shade... a little mix with your brush and it’s there! Wrong green? Need one slightly cooler or warmer? Dip, dip & slur on the palette and you’ve got it! If you want the same color with pastel and want to add colors without blending so much on the piece, seems like I need to have them laid out beside me... not to agonize over, but to grab as quickly and easily as I would if I had a palette to mix on. I don’t want to moosh some colors around on the piece to get the right color for some foliage... (reminding me of what SBJ had said about blending and undoing the pure life that pastels have)... I want the pure colors to sparkle gently through or beside one another.

I suspect SBJ's right in that having them all in view at once might actually be stifling to the paint impulse,

Am thinking that having them all out in view may not be all that stifling to the painting impulse, but the getting them organized sure might!

but would be such fun, just for awhile, to spread 'em all out and bask in the glow!

Ahhhhhhhhhhhh... to bask in the glow!!!! I get all dreamy headed just thinking about basking in that glow!!!! I may look back on this thread one day and say to myself “Shoulda listened, old girl!” But, for now, I will plod onward in my quest for great paper and many, many, many pastels. Diamonds are a girl’s best friend? HAH! They’re pretty, but cold and hard and don’t make you purr when you roll them in your fingers! :cat:

Khadres
01-03-2005, 06:49 PM
Diamonds are a girl’s best friend? HAH! They’re pretty, but cold and hard and don’t make you purr when you roll them in your fingers! :cat:

You got it! Exactly the way I feel. Try as I might, I've never...in any type of artwork/craftwork I've ever done...been able to resist a love affaire with the materials involved. Sure...pastel sticks are just "tools" to be used and in a purely practical sense, one has to approach one's tools with a certain logicality (new word?). But, at the same time, there is something purely sensual about the beauty of the materials one uses and I get into that a lot, I guess. If I were a dragon (and some think I AM...:D) I'd be found with a treasure full of colors of all kinds...paint, pastels, pens, crayons, crewel threads, fabrics, you name it. Forget blah old gold and silver coins and trinkets...gimme rainbows and huge brand new boxes of crayons!

Maybe this "benign addiction" comes from always being given the smallest possible box of Crayolas and told I didn't "need" more when I was small. One of my earliest memories of having some money ($2 from my grandmother) is the pure joy of purchasing the 64 color set of Crayolas and a tablet of smooth white paper. I was in heaven all summer that year. I had no money left for ice cream treats and swimming pool sessions, but I didn't mind...I had shade trees to lie beneath with my colors and paper and the hours and days flew by. Am I the only person living whose heartbeat picks up when entering a school classroom and smelling the sack lunches overlaid by Crayola perfume?

t-sue
01-03-2005, 07:55 PM
Nope!!! ;)

Ruth Grinstead
01-04-2005, 04:30 AM
[QUOTE=t-sue]Coming at this as a newbie, I find it so frustrating to reach for a color for a subtle change and not have it there! If you have 8 or 10 little blobs of watercolor or oil on your palette, you have a gazillion hues and values at your fingertips to work from! Need just a tiny bit lighter or darker shade... a little mix with your brush and it’s there! Wrong green? Need one slightly cooler or warmer? Dip, dip & slur on the palette and you’ve got it! If you want the same color with pastel and want to add colors without blending so much on the piece, seems like I need to have them laid out beside me... not to agonize over, but to grab as quickly and easily as I would if I had a palette to mix on. I don’t want to moosh some colors around on the piece to get the right color for some foliage... (reminding me of what SBJ had said about blending and undoing the pure life that pastels have)... I want the pure colors to sparkle gently through or beside one another.
QUOTE]

I was here too - in watercolour 13 tubes would mix any colour I could think of. As soon as I moved to pastel I started feeling as though unless the exact colour and value was there as a stick then ..............

Now I find the quantity of pastels more of a hindrance than a help..........I lost all of my desire to try and work plein air..........totally forgot how to mix a colour.........

So I have a Schmincke box that holds 15 pastels.........this is getting my watercolour colours at full strength plus black and white and is to be my plein air kit..............which is so liberating as I now feel I can venture out with my bag and easel and not have to take my whole studio with me :D

Ruth

meowmeow
01-08-2005, 11:55 AM
I suppose it is possible to have too many...but what a fun problem!
Really, I think there are some good ideas here.
Right now I have a box with my plein air and portrait workshop pastels...the portrait stuff is on one side and the landscape on the other, although I do use them all. Then at home I have a large number of them out. I haven't counted though and don't think I have 2000 of them. Probably many hundreds. And I find I do tend to reach for the asame stuff most of the time. It hasn't been a problem.
What I have been thinking about doing is this. I know when I have gotten sets invariably there are a couple or sometimes even a few pastels which I never use. IN some cases is it a black or really white and those I just set aside. I try not to clutter up my "display" with them. But there are always these really weird blues or greens or reds, what have you, which I never touch. Or maybe I tried once and that was more than enough. I am thinking of pulling those all out...putting them into a box and taking a good look. I suspect they are all pretty much in the middle value range for some reason, but maybe not. If they are I would throw in a couple of lights and darks. Then taking this odd batch of colors and doing a painting with them. Sort of not worrying about the color but sing the right value. It would be interesting to see what I come up with...in fact I just started something else but this may be my next project. SHould be interesting! :D
By the way, I just cleaned up my studio and got my pastels organized in my new trays ffrom Dakota that I had hubby get me for a Chanukah present. I am so pleased with the whole work area I took some photos...I'm going to post them in a few minutes.


Sandy


SAndy

BlueJackal
01-08-2005, 06:04 PM
Since I don't have access to any goot art supply stores nearby, I've become an eBay junkie. I've found it easier and less expensive to buy sets on ebay, rather than buying open stock from a website. I just got a set of senneliers and I'm awaiting 80 Schmincke's (Yay!). I've read that a lot of you out there don't really like the senneliers, but I've found them to be sooooo awesome and rich and smooth. I have yet to find a crumbly one.

I have a moderate amount of pastels now (About 400), but I keep about 100 of my most-used in a "Roz-Box", which I can take anywhere with me, and the rest I'm keeping in bins, organized by hue, that I can pull out conveniently if I need an additional color.

I can sympathize with some of those who commented above. I *love* pulling out my pastels and just looking at how beautiful they all are. I have a love affair with color in general (Rich sunsets take my breath away), and it's nice to have all those colors avaialable, even if I only regularly use some of them.

SweetBabyJ
01-08-2005, 06:23 PM
Look for an guy on EBay who sells under the name "alliedartstore" (usually). He sells open stock Schminckes, Unison, and Senneliers quite often. His packaging is a bit weird sometimes (basically, bundle up those little 3-stick boxes, and wrap in bubblewrap, then mummify the bundle in strapping tape) but the price is right, and I've not had any problem with damage.

Kitty Wallis
01-08-2005, 08:33 PM
I don't think he's on Ebay any more. If you see him, let me know. Please

SweetBabyJ
01-08-2005, 08:49 PM
I dunno- I still get emails from him, Kitty, but I haven't EBayed in quite awhile.

meowmeow
01-08-2005, 09:22 PM
Alliedartstore? Funny, it sounds like Smallworldpaint too. I haven't bought anything on ebay for a while though...maybe I'll have to got check and see who is still selling what.
I did buy a bunch over time from Smallworldpaint, Rick from Israel. Weird packaging but the stuff was always good. I got Giraults from him as well.

Sandy

SweetBabyJ
01-08-2005, 09:29 PM
Yeah- same guy as far as I know. And I just got three "set" offers for incredible prices over last weekend- Unisons, Schminckes and Sennelier sets at about 40% off from any of the online stores. I was impressed- but broke. :mad:

meowmeow
01-08-2005, 09:33 PM
Yep, he's still there. Here is a link to all his listings for right now:

http://search.ebay.com/_W0QQsofocusZsoQQsbrftogZ1QQsorecordsperpageZ25QQfromZR10QQcatrefZC6QQsotrtypeZ1QQsotrvalueZ1QQsellerZ1QQsassZsmallworldpaintQQsosortpropertyZ1QQcoactionZcompareQQcopagenumZ1QQcoentrypageZsearch

A dangerous man! :D

I'm laying low for a while...as much as I love to get more I don't really need anything right now. I think the next splurge will be some more Terry Ludwigs. I don't have a lot of those and am using up the wonderful creamy off white one...sort of light, yellowy cream.

SweetBabyJ
01-08-2005, 10:40 PM
ooohhhhh Sandy! You temptress, you!!

Kitty Wallis
01-09-2005, 02:18 AM
Thanks for the link, I found him He owes me a lot of $$

khourianya
01-09-2005, 02:31 AM
I had really bad luck actually getting stuff from him...we constantly seemed to be on the phone with each other trying to straighten out exactly where my pastels could have gotten to. Finally, 2 months later, I asked for a refund and we ended the sale that way. I figured that as much as I wanted the pastels, if I had the money in my hands, i could just go to the store for some instant gratification :D

jackiesimmonds
01-09-2005, 04:42 AM
You guys ARE lucky ...there are rarely any pastels on offer on Ebay UK (if anyone spots any, do let me know) and most of the US ebayers wont send out of the US, dont blame them, pastels are heavy to send and the postage would be a lot, and then I would probably have to pay duty.....grr.

I have no idea how many pastels I have, but certainly nothing like as many as you Sooz, but I don't think my pics suffer too much from lack of colour - what do yu think?

For any painting, i select what I want to use from my various trays and drawers, put them into a small plastic tray, and pick out extras from the main selection if and when I need them. At the end, I usually have no more than about 20 sticks in the hand tray. Then, they go back in the main selection trays and drawers - eventually.

I know some of you have seen these pics, but maybe some haven't, and I canot resist showing them again:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jan-2005/1805-elsie_popkin.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jan-2005/1805-elsie_popkin2.jpg

clearly, she cannot bear to be parted from any of her pastels, and needs to see them all, all at once, no matter where she is!!!!!!!

J

Khadres
01-09-2005, 06:24 AM
LOL, now THAT gal has way more pastels than I do! Jackie, your method is pretty much how I've been doing things, too...picking out a palette for the painting at hand and leaving everything else boxed, drawered, etc. It's really the only rational way to do it, but in passing I can't help but see all the others and sigh a bit.

I, too, gave up on smallworldpaint guy when he sent me only about 2/3 of what I ordered and a bunch of dupes for most of the rest, but missing a dozen or so entirely which I never got my money back for. That plus the constant "surcharges" for packing and picking and stuff...the pastels wound up about the same price apiece as Blick's anyway. He also had a bad habit of sending me emails months later wondering when I was going to pay him (which I had already done and even already had cancelled checks for), so then we'd have to wrangle about that.

meowmeow
01-09-2005, 08:29 AM
I love Jackie's garden too!!!!

It's interesting because I know from reading Rick's feedback that people have had problems, and I don't doubt it. But I never did. He was alays friendly, prompt and the stuff arrived exactly as advertised and in good condition.
I think he does a lot and I think it gets away from him. Too bad...because you can get some good deals. But obviously if it gets to be too much of a hassle or the money thing gets messed up it isn't worth it.


Sandy

Barrynotlarry
01-09-2005, 03:14 PM
Wow, your telling my story here. I'm the dude every one laughs at when I show up to do a portrait or to a drawing group. A lot of the time people help me lug my toys back and forth. Who cares, we are having fun. I can NEVER have enough pastels. I buy tons off the internet, I make my own and find them on sale or at the flea markets. So it's all part of my compulsive behavior and it's fun to play with them all.
Lets have fun with our colors.
Barry

BlueJackal
01-09-2005, 03:59 PM
Alliedartstore? Funny, it sounds like Smallworldpaint too. I haven't bought anything on ebay for a while though...maybe I'll have to got check and see who is still selling what.
I did buy a bunch over time from Smallworldpaint, Rick from Israel. Weird packaging but the stuff was always good. I got Giraults from him as well.

Sandy

Yeah, I've had good luck with Smallworldpaint so far. That's where I got my senneliers (and where the schmincke's that I'm waiting for are coming from).

Kitty Wallis
01-09-2005, 07:27 PM
As has been said in this thread, we tend to accumulate duplicates. I've been avoiding the time-consuming task of sorting out the duplicates -- where to put the duplicates? -- How to have an ongoing system for not getting more duplicates...???

Sometimes, to illustrate 'color denial' (a condition I find in most pastel artists, the ability to convince ourselves that a lot of duplicates means we have a lot of colors), I ask a classfull of students this question:

Have you had this experience:? In the art supply store, scanning the open stick pastels for a color you noted you don't have in a recent painting session, you find a color that's close, maybe close enough, buy it, bring it home and find you already have a few of that color and it isn't 'close enough'! :mad:

Everytime I've asked this there has been a general surprised response, Yes!
This experience is one of the sources of duplicates.

One possible solution is a 'shopping list' by your easel. A piece of paper for strokes of a color you are using up or colors that are close to what you want, surrounding it, so you can find the missing ones. Of course there may not be any of what you want, but at least you won't bring home the ones you have.

Khadres
01-10-2005, 03:28 PM
Good points, Kitty! Let's face it...pastels are a bit too pricey to go buying half a dozen different but similars or duplicates! Especially when there probably IS that perfect one out there if one has the patience to find it.

paloma
01-10-2005, 04:28 PM
At this moment in time I am lamenting the lack of colours - whenever I start a new piece I seem to be searching for the RIGHT shade - especially when doing a portrait!! Because it is very difficult for me to purchase fresh supplies - Rembrant being the only make stocked here; they have a limited colour range & are not to my liking at all being rather hard.

I have to wait until there is a trip to the UK - then I always forget to make a note of what I have already & pick up a colour chart.It is imperative I see the colours in the flesh too. So I manage on about 100. Have just had 2 nice tiered boxes delivered & when I excitedly started filling them realised that I would need to purchase a lot more to fill them up!! Then I have this dreadful habit of picking up a colour & another & another until I have a fistful, so at the end of a painting session all my carefully arranged colours are so muddled that I have to spend forever putting them back in order again - hubbie says I am the messiest person he has ever seen in the Studio!!.

I would so like to have endless shades of purple & blue , a marvelous range of flesh tones, I am lacking in good shades of pink - there are never enough reds of the right hue etc etc. Then at the end of the day I get by with what I have. If I had every shade imaginable like you sooz would end up not knowing where to put them all!! You see I am a colour addict - can never have enough variety.

Kitty Wallis
01-10-2005, 04:57 PM
Then I have this dreadful habit of picking up a colour & another & another until I have a fistful, so at the end of a painting session all my carefully arranged colours are so muddled that I have to spend forever putting them back in order again - hubbie says I am the messiest person he has ever seen in the Studio!!.

Hubby is wrong, You are almost doing it right. IMHO. ;)

I have a tray where I put the current colors, rather than keep them in my hand, and replace them in their ordered place when the painting is done. That way I can quickly find the colors rather than grab something close to it. Repeating colors in the painting is a good and powerful technique, worth encouraging.

jackiesimmonds
01-11-2005, 05:04 AM
Alexandra

Unison make a HAND PAINTED colour chart, using real pastels, as opposed to a printed chart where the colours are never quite the same.

they charge for it but I dont know how much. Their number is either 01434 2404203 or 240457, not sure which.

Each sheet of the chart comes in a plastic see-thro wallet to protect the colours from smudging. It is really helpful to have the colours as actual pastel blocks.

then, yu could order from one of the European mail order outlets.

J

paloma
01-11-2005, 11:13 AM
Thanks Kitty - will have to find a space for a tray on my trolley for placing the current colours I use from now on; will certainly help keeping my hands clean too.; Sounds a good tip especially as when I appear after a painting session will look less like a clown!! lol.

Thanks also Jackie You are a mine of information - I remember you telling me about 'Great Art' catalogue - have received one order from them & another on it's way ; what a fantastic delivery service I had too & no extra charge !! I love Unison pastels so will put that colour chart on my next order :cat: :cat: