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Melania
12-17-2004, 12:24 AM
Let it snow !
I got all the gear I need to stand out in 30 degree weather, but do not have a warm jacket, we are expecting snow in next few days.

I found a down 3/4 length coat covering to the knees, with lined hood and wide strap around the chin to keep out wind, but wonder if this coat would feel heavy on the shoulders after an hour or two ? Is this anything to be concerned about?

Melanie

Limner
12-17-2004, 06:52 AM
Let it snow !
I got all the gear I need to stand out in 30 degree weather, but do not have a warm jacket, we are expecting snow in next few days.

I found a down 3/4 length coat covering to the knees, with lined hood and wide strap around the chin to keep out wind, but wonder if this coat would feel heavy on the shoulders after an hour or two ? Is this anything to be concerned about?

Melanie

Hi Melanie,
I use an all in one cold suit, it's very light, then on top of that I put lightweight breathable waterproof jacket and trousers and a pair of waterproof boots. (The rain is a problem, keep it out)
I'm not sure about the 3/4 coat, I suspect that because it's hanging off your shoulders then it cold get heavy, it would depend whether you'd feel comfortable having your painting arm pulled down by the coat. You could tie it off round the middle to stop it hanging. I recommend you wear something shorter but put several laters of leggings on and pull them up as high as you can. You could always take the coat with you and use it as a shelter or an extra layer when you're not at the easel.


Limner

midcoast
12-17-2004, 08:39 AM
I'd say just give it a try a couple of times and see how it feels :) I personally use the following for cold weather painting (all from thrift stores):

-lightweight ski pants for cold days
-heavy ski bibs for VERY cold days
-lightweight polar fleece pants that I wear alone or under one of the above
-various weights of fleece jackets
-an old, black, GoreTex windbreaker with hood as the top layer if needed
-Columbia BugaBoo boots

I go for the layered approach so I can easily adapt to the conditions. Whatever you use though, Keep Warm!!

Nancy

Limner
12-17-2004, 09:04 AM
Loose fitting is better ;) :wave:

European sizes can be quite different.


limner ;)

nancymae
12-17-2004, 10:54 AM
:p :p -- LOVE YOUR PICTURES LIMNER!!!!

Don't forget long underwear Melanie...they can be a life saver!! And you don't have to get the expensive kind either...the $5.00 Discount Store specials work just as fine!! I especially like them for under my jeans.

Also, pick up some of those handwarmers too that Larry and Marc talk about...they help keeping hands warm. Electric socks are good too.

Have fun!
Nancy

Limner
12-17-2004, 11:00 AM
Electric Socks! Is ther really such a thing?

Melania
12-17-2004, 01:29 PM
Limner, thanks for the ideas, and your photos, I love them, good composition <grin>,the idea of tying the long coat around the waist is a good one too.

NancyR, I am off to the thrift store for whatever I may find !!!

NancyM, I got several of the disposable 1.50 toe warmers and smart wool gloves to wear under mittens, so far I am most pleased with med weight merino wool socks, tried them out yesterday and feet kept very warm.

Melanie

LarrySeiler
12-17-2004, 02:00 PM
it was about 6 degrees last night not counting wind chill. I was in a tree with my deer stand, wearing a thermal shirt (long johns) over a t-shirt. Over that I wore an acrylic sweater, over that a wool zip up, and over that the equivalent of a hooded zippered sweatshirt jacket that was camoflaged. I wore a camo hood over my head and face, and a warm polar fleece hat over that. My gloves were wool with finger tips cut off.

camo jean pants over thermal bottoms, cotton socks with a pair of wool socks in a pair of boots rated to minus 40 degrees.

The secret is layers...where a bit of air gets trapped between each layer. The body temperatures affect each layer's trapped space helping to keep the body warm.

There are some very unique tight body suits now that are ideally suited to keep in warmth, allow sweat to exit. That is the material breathes. Cabella's, L.Beans and many retailers provide them. Many cross country skiers are finding them ideal. Light, body forming, warm.

Larry

Limner
12-17-2004, 02:03 PM
Limner, thanks for the ideas, and your photos, I love them, good composition <grin>,the idea of tying the long coat around the waist is a good one too.

NancyR, I am off to the thrift store for whatever I may find !!!

NancyM, I got several of the disposable 1.50 toe warmers and smart wool gloves to wear under mittens, so far I am most pleased with med weight merino wool socks, tried them out yesterday and feet kept very warm.

Melanie
Hi Melanie,

please don't underestimate the effect of wearing a thin pair of cotton socks under a thick pair of woollen socks, this can keep the temperature in your boot and is very comfortable.

Cheers

Limner

coh
12-17-2004, 04:00 PM
Melanie,

I have a coat that sounds similar to yours - Lands End down parka, I bought
it especially for painting. Bought an extra large size so I could layer under it.
It comes down to my knees. I've worn it a couple of times for 2-3 hour
painting sessions and have not had a problem with it being too heavy on the
shoulders. YMMV, of course.

The feet seem to be the biggest problem. I need to get some good insulated
boots. Today I wore 2 pairs of socks (one wool), and used a chemical heat
pack in each boot but still they got cold. Another thing to try is using a
piece of old rug (or some other insulator) to stand on, I've heard that
helps.

My hands were OK, wore thin latex-type gloves under thin knit gloves.
But it wasn't all that cold (28 or so).

Chris

pameladallaire
12-17-2004, 05:56 PM
I wear long johns, wool pants, a good (old) down coat, snowmobile boots with the linings replaced to -40 deg. linings, hat and mitts. The only thing I have to warm is my fingers by tucking them inside the jacket. :D Pam

Dirt Dude
12-17-2004, 08:14 PM
I worked in the outdoors in Monterey today (my day job) and was very warm in my deep winter getup: t-shirt and shorts. I was a bit too warm and was sweating at one point.

Melania
12-17-2004, 11:36 PM
Well, Nancy, I spent the afternoon at the thrift store and spent $17 dollars. Found a great thick fleece jacket, a zip-up vest with a lined hood which fits over the fleece jacket, and a pair of white mountain snow pants with a bib and suspenders, comfy ones. Still need a top coat for wind or snow and like the idea of a longer one.
So, layering it is, thanks Larry, Chris, great idea to stand on a rug.
Howard, it's too bad there are no stores in Monterey carrying cold weather goods, maybe you can move someday to a more seasonable climate. :cat:

Melanie

israelyang
12-18-2004, 12:05 PM
hello
I haven't the time to read through all the replies. From my experience, I learned that if yuo wear double layers and a nice jacket your body will feel warm enough. What you really need to watch out is the feet, they get frozen. You need to wear thick socks and nice winter boots with fur inside to keep your feet warm. As for hands its your choice whether you want to sacrifice the handiness for warmth(wearing thick gloves/).

midcoast
12-20-2004, 08:49 AM
Melanie -

Aren't those thrift stores amazing?? Sounds like you're ready for whatever Mother Nature throws at you. Have fun painting in the cold - I personally find that I do my best paintings when it's below freezing :) The cold keeps me working loosely...

Nancy

MChesleyJohnson
12-21-2004, 03:19 PM
Love that photo of the suit! Reminds me of the Beatle's film, "Magical Mystery Tour".

"I am the Walrus, goo-goo-ka-choo..."

:)

jimb
12-21-2004, 03:40 PM
I'm afraid I don't get very high-tech with the clothing. I just use an old military jacket that I don't mind getting paint on (you see whenever I paint, I end up getting paint on me somewhere :) ), some old garden gloves and most importantly, a small bag of pretzels. Yes pretzels! :) They are handy, and help keep the internal fires going if you know what I mean! :)

LeeHaber
12-21-2004, 03:46 PM
My favorite winter painting outfit! :D

frisbee1948
12-21-2004, 04:25 PM
Lee: How do you keep your paint from melting in all that winter heat?

Leigh
12-21-2004, 05:04 PM
If you are looking for warm boots, this is what saved me from a life of staying inside.

I have a condition called Raynaud's Phenomenon (Raynaud's is a condition in which the blood supply to the extremities, usually the fingers and toes, but sometimes also the ears and nose, is interrupted. An attack will often be triggered by touching cold objects or exposure to cold of any kind) and also Chillblains (Chilblains are a painful abnormal reaction of the small blood vessels in the skin when exposed to cold temperatures).

Never in my life have I had warm feet until my husband bought me some Mukluks. They are not cheap ($140) but well worth their price at least for me. Like wearing a warm slipper. The best part for me at least is that they are not tight so there is no constricting of toes and such. I have the Traditional version.

http://www.mukluks.com/index.shtml

No, I don't get any compensation from them, nor am I related. It is just that I FINALLY have warm toes and it is all their fault. :clap:

Melania
12-22-2004, 12:46 AM
hello
You need to wear thick socks and nice winter boots with fur inside to keep your feet warm. As for hands its your choice whether you want to sacrifice the handiness for warmth(wearing thick gloves/).

Israel, yes, I have good boots and socks, my feet and ears get cold before anything else. BTW - I looked at your website and your work is enchanting.

Melanie

israelyang
12-22-2004, 12:48 AM
Oh thank you Melanie :)

Melania
12-22-2004, 12:50 AM
Melanie -

I personally find that I do my best paintings when it's below freezing :) The cold keeps me working loosely...

Nancy

Now this is motivating ! I am looking forward to it.

Melanie

Melania
12-22-2004, 12:55 AM
Never in my life have I had warm feet until my husband bought me some Mukluks.

Faye,

I have marked their page, I have Uggs, but do not wear them in the slush, I wear Uggs with no socks, I have them on now, the lining of Uggs are thick lambwool.
Thanks,

Melanie

Sarah Judson
12-23-2004, 04:51 PM
Those Mukluks are beautiful!
Thanks, Faye

Leigh
12-23-2004, 08:30 PM
Sarah,
Not just about beauty. When my husband bought me the Mukluks, we were dating. Now we're married. Not sure but the Mukluks might have had something to do with it. ;)

Sarah Judson
12-23-2004, 11:12 PM
Ha!
(I tried to use the *wink* icon, but it wouldn't work).

manfrommerriam
12-24-2004, 09:09 PM
Well, I agree with all that has been said but will comment: I take a page from the XC sking people and wear a pair of panty hose under army surplus class-A uniform trousers. these are thin all wool pants that shed snow and stay warm in the wet. To keep your hands warm wear a good hat, this is because if your head gets cold the blood will be diverted to it away from the hands. Then I use some cheap stretchy white gloves I get in hardware stores called "Stanley HandHelpers". I have had frost bite and as a result am pretty sensitive to cold hands and these things are great. If you intend to stand in really cold weather look at the products sold up North such as inflatable "moon boots" or the double mountaineering boots; cost a lot but no lost toes is quite an argument. Layers of wool on top with a good rain and wind blocking outer layer. The Lands End firm sells some really snug jackets and I use those. Have fun, and keep warm! :) Dave