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View Full Version : Questions about Corel Painter . . .


Fredzo
12-15-2004, 06:26 PM
Hello Everyone. I usually hang out at the Oils forum, but i also love digital tools! I know Photoshop (v7.0.1) very well and have been using it for years. I LOVE the ability to layer, layer, layer until the cows come home.

BUT ive never really spent alot of time with Painter, Do you people like it? What do you like about it, and what is annoying about it? I suppose one of these days i'll just have to buy it and spend some time learning it. Thanks everyone in advance.

Elvira
12-15-2004, 08:09 PM
Painter is a painters program! :clap: :clap: I have had it since version 6, and my only regret I can't afford the upgrade to Painter IX for now, which is the best one yet.
I suggest checking in at:Painter Can/2DStudio (http://tinyurl.com/72399) Where a group of Painter lovers share their experiences good and bad.
And this one on the Corel site: Artist's Oils (http://tinyurl.com/3vome)

Then I'd Download (http://tinyurl.com/35tf7) Painter IX and play for 30 days!
Edie

Flint_Holberg 917-G
12-16-2004, 05:21 AM
Hello Everyone. I usually hang out at the Oils forum, but i also love digital tools! I know Photoshop (v7.0.1) very well and have been using it for years. I LOVE the ability to layer, layer, layer until the cows come home.

BUT ive never really spent alot of time with Painter, Do you people like it? What do you like about it, and what is annoying about it? I suppose one of these days i'll just have to buy it and spend some time learning it. Thanks everyone in advance.

I have had Painter since version 4.....8 is the latest version that I have. It's a great program, but to be honest I prefer Photoshop (v7.0.1). If you are trying to simulate natural media, Painter is probably the best choice, but most of what I do is 3-D design and photography, so I tend to primarily use Photoshop, especially now that it comes with so many brushes and the Art History Brush. Photoshop has me spoiled.....it's rock solid stable, it produces quality results and it's got more than enough features to keep me busy the rest of my life.

_________________________

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Dec-2004/51883-Signature-Logo-Final_120904.jpg

Elvira
12-16-2004, 07:06 AM
Here is a link I found this morning of a review of Painter IX written by a long time user opf PS but new to Painter.
http://www.applelinks.com/pm/more.php?id=2979_0_1_0_M
This was written by a Mac user for Mac, Painter is however a cross platform program it works on either.
elvira

Fredzo
12-16-2004, 10:39 PM
Thank You everyone for your good response! I did consider those replies and thank you for all the links!

Does Painter 'Layer' like photoshop? In other words can you create many layers and use layer settings like multiply, colorize etc??

Also i read somewhere that Painter is somehow compatible with Photoshop -what in the heck does that mean?

Elvira; i just saw your latest picture -you rule. That is good stuff!

Jin
12-17-2004, 01:15 AM
Hi,

Yes, Painter has Layers, more kinds of Layers than Photoshop has in fact. If you're working back and forth between Painter and Photoshop, there should be no problem if you're using Painter's Default Layers and not using any brush variants that won't carry over as intended. That leaves a very wide range of things that will work in both programs and even if you're using some things that Photoshop won't understand, the workflow can be adjusted to get around that problem.

Painter's Layer types include:

Default Layers (regular Layers)

Watercolor Layers (must be set to Composite Method Gel for the intended look of Watercolor paint)

Liquid Ink Layers (dynamically adjustable paint)

Reference Layers (used as an interim step in processing images, a low resolution stand-in for the image, a Reference Layer holds several versions of the image at different resolutions until the user is finished working with the Reference Layer and commits it to a Default Layer)

Text Layers (dynamically editable, and later converted to vector based Text Shapes which can also be edited)

Vector based Shapes (are layered above the Canvas equivalent to Background in Photoshop, and editable).

The Painter IX Digital Watercolors use an invisible wet layer associated with either the Canvas or Layer, whichever holds the wet Digital Watercolor paint, which can be dried so dry brush variants' paint can then interact with dry Digital Watercolor paint.

Watercolor brush variants only work on Water Color Layers and Liquid Ink brush variants only work on Liquid Ink Layers, the latter being dynamic so both the Amount and Threshold sliders can be adjusted to make the Liquid Ink paint have more volume (Amount) and the brushstroke have more or less density (Threshold).

Some of these Layer types won't carry over to Photoshop in their native condition, since Photoshop won't understand them. For instance,

Watercolor Layers (paint will be dry and WC Layer will be set to Blending Mode Darken, when saved in Photoshop then reopened in Painter, WC Layer is no longer a WC Layer and is now a Default Layer with Composite Method still set to Darken)

Liquid Ink Layers (no longer dynamic when opened in Photoshop or when saved in Photoshop and reopened in Painter)

Text Layers (no longer editable, just a normal pixel based Layer when opened in Photoshop and when saved in Photoshop and reopened in Painter)

Reference Layers (are used as an interim step in processing images anyway so it's not likely the user would want them to carry over to Photoshop)

Shapes (don't carry over as editable vector based lines and shapes, a single rectangular Shape filled with green and stroked with red opens in Photoshop 7 as two separate pixel based Layers, one green and the other red)

Wet Digital Watercolor paint is dried when the image is saved in PSD format and remains dry when the image is reopened in Painter, whereas if the image were saved in Painter IX' native RIFF format and reopened in Painter IX, the Digital Watercolor paint would still be wet.

With all that said, most Painter users also use Photoshop to complete their images and a lot of Photoshop users are now finding Painter to be the software of choice for painting and often for drawing as well.

The combination of these two programs provides a huge and powerful array of tools for any artist or photographer.

I second Elvira's suggestion to download Painter IX and play with it for 30 days. We've been hearing rave reviews since before it was released and continue to hear them.

I love Painter IX, have been a daily user of Painter since Painter 4, and agree this is by far the best version yet.


Happy Painting!

P.S. Almost forgot to say that Painter's Composite Methods are the rough equivalent to Photoshop's Blending Modes and many of them match.