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rserra
12-14-2004, 01:42 AM

tURBOCAT
12-14-2004, 06:36 AM
I like this - very expressive and great brushwork.

How large is it? Somber colors but it works!

Smileawhyl
12-14-2004, 10:29 AM
evokative as well, very good

reminds me of Jasper Johns but tells me of a familiar story

excellent

rserra
12-14-2004, 05:37 PM
Thanks Turbocat and Smileawhyl...(sp)

Look a little harder and you'll see Kline!

And thank you for the comment on brushwork. I'll share how that's done sometime if you want to know.

Again, thank you.

yellowjkt01
12-15-2004, 01:06 AM
Nice piece. I especially like the limited palette, overall design, and texture work. It is very challenging using different values of only greys/blacks and succeeding, you have done so here. I would be interested in reading how you accomplished this.

Tamana
12-15-2004, 08:04 AM
Great depth & effect. Minimalism of palette is like a loud whisper sometimes; it's all it takes.

katieface
01-03-2005, 10:23 PM
What a ghost-y, gorgeous, nervous painting. It is beautiful, and more beautiful still for being monochromatic.

A haunting image. I find myself going back & back to this. Thanks for sharing it.

it'sALLart
01-28-2005, 04:52 PM
this and your other kline-esque painting (the monotone one) are both pretty darn good. the other ones seem like experiments, but this one... wow. if i didn't know better (and don't take this wrong) i'd say this was some old, undiscovered painting from the late 40's that you are posting to trick us. the brush work here is just that much more sophisticated-looking than your earlier pieces.

i'm a huge Kline fan and have only tried emulating him once and not with the best results, either. hats off to you.

Even If It Rains
01-28-2005, 05:03 PM
POWERFULL, and yes very Kline but no pretending-to-be here .

Matt

it'sALLart
01-29-2005, 10:47 AM
From: Paris Review Anthology, 2004, A Quote by Robert Creeley:

One time, again some years ago, Franz Kline was being questioned - not with hostility, but with intensity, by a friend - and he finally said, "Well, look, if I paint what YOU know, then that will simply bore you, the repetition from me to you. If I paint what I know, it will be boring to myself. Therefore I paint what I don't know."

rserra
01-30-2005, 02:21 AM
Great comment on painting what you don't know, a hallmark of the Action painters. Seems like you do your homework. That's refreshing.

Oh, you might like this.

Rothko was walking with critic (I believe) Clement Greenberg in New York one fine day in the early sixties. Greenberg suddenly said (paraphrasing) "Oh, look, there's Andy Warhol. I want you to introduce you two. Whereupon Rothko, in his inimitably peckish style, looked at Warhol and, without a word, turned and walked away!

That's for all those that think he paintd pretty rectangles when in fact he was preoccupied, as Motherwell and others, with death. He wanted to draw people into his work and have it bother the hell out of them, thus getting them to perhaps think and bring themselves to another level of feeling and being.

Anybody want to go to Houston and see the Rothko Chapel with me?

Koert
01-30-2005, 05:54 AM
It's just fantastic
What size is it?

Even If It Rains
01-30-2005, 07:37 AM
That's for all those that think he paintd pretty rectangles when in fact he was preoccupied, as Motherwell and others, with death. He wanted to draw people into his work and have it bother the hell out of them, thus getting them to perhaps think and bring themselves to another level of feeling and being.

Anybody want to go to Houston and see the Rothko Chapel with me?

Thats exactly what I see when I look at Rothko's work, morbid , a black wind of death , depression, which is kinda why I don't like 'em. Still would be interesting and a completely different experience to see them in person. Too bad I'm about 4,000 miles away..

Matt

bbbilly1326
01-30-2005, 10:57 AM
From: Paris Review Anthology, 2004, A Quote by Robert Creeley:

One time, again some years ago, Franz Kline was being questioned - not with hostility, but with intensity, by a friend - and he finally said, "Well, look, if I paint what YOU know, then that will simply bore you, the repetition from me to you. If I paint what I know, it will be boring to myself. Therefore I paint what I don't know."

I just bought this bio of Kline, where I read that quote too. The statement really told me something I had never thought before about Art, particularly modern art. It also has many plates of his work, large and small. It's by Gaugh, 1985, Franz Kline. Highly recommended for fans or anyone wanting to know more about his life and work.

He was really quite a tragic figure, even though the book reports he was always very sociable and lively and cheerful. Spent 11 years in an orphanage, his father committed suicide when he was 7 (the impact of which must have been very traumatic as he commented later "I was my father's favorite son" --heartbreaking really), then spending much of his adult life in grinding poverty, having his wife psychiatrically committed for the duration of his life, then dying too young at age 51 of rheumatic heart failure. A tragic story redeemed by Art.