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Karin Skold
12-13-2004, 08:04 AM
Hi,

It seems I have walked into a door again....:(
I have been working most of the autumn with a project, illustrating.
As I am hardworking, trying to please, do my best. I thought I did all right.
Did changes when there was need for that.Spent hours and hours with this.
Also little paid. But I loved the work, so I accepted that.

Now, yesterday came an email to all freelancers. We didnt do our best. We didnt involved our family , friends in this enough. To get the books sold.
I knew it should mean some of that. But I have been so busy with my illustrating to do all right and nice. So, there was no time for that .
They said we were not welcomed if we dont involve our family i the work...:/ Trying to succeed with advert the books.

I have worked so hard with this. I cant undrstand anything.
I have read and read the books. T´rying to understand everything I need to know.
When my language is an other than Englsish, I need to understand it even better...

Now..I am not welcomed any longer...:(

Work for hire..for nothing...or very little.
And be treated like this..
Really I feel very much hurt, and sad.
Very nice Christmas present of this publisher !
I cant tell you who it is, but take care. Be careful when you sign a contract with work for hire !!

Any other here with experiences in this ?
Should love to hear from you !
And what you advice me to do ?
I loved the work, it was Fantasy drawing.

I have never before experienced something like this.And I had some very nice publsihers before to work with.
I just feel all the work I did this autumn is "in vain"..
It makes me feel depressed.

Love
Ka
:crying: rin

TedDawson
12-13-2004, 10:04 AM
There are plenty of people out there who are more than willing to take advantage of illustrators. Each one of us has had at least one experience where we got burned. Sometimes I think it is just mandatory, a trial by fire. But I do know that an illustrator's career cannot really begin until he or she learns to say No to a job if the terms are not right.

Some basics for determining whether or not those terms are right: Never do Work-for-Hire. Only sell the usage rights that the client needs. Make sure that the client pays you half up front and the other half when the job is completed. Specify how many "re-do's" you'll do before you start charging additional fees. Include a "kill fee" whereby you will get paid even if the client kills the job before you're done with it. And make sure it is all in writing and signed before you begin any work on the job.

Do you have any written agreement with these people?

If you have sent them any art, demand that you get it back. Inform them in writing that if they use any of the art that you will sue them. It's not uncommon for people like that to say they don't like the work but then use it anyway, just to keep from having to pay.

If there are any artist organizations in your area, they may have some legal resources for you to use.

You will probably have to just file this away in the "Live and learn" category, but first you should at least demand payment from them, but do not give them permission to use your art. It is common to get paid even for work that the publisher does not use; getting paid is not dependent on the work being published. So basically, they're bluffing; you should do the same and demand full payment, without their use of the work, or else you will have to use a lawyer. Unfortunately, that is the way everything works in the States. And much of the time, just the suggesstion of legal action gets people to cooperate.

Karin Skold
12-13-2004, 10:25 AM
Hi,

Thanks so much for your reply ! Appreciate it verymuch,it makes me feel I am not alone in this.
Yes, I have a signed agreement. And they should pay me now for what I have completed. They said.

But this when you are supposed to advert the book yourself. Use your website to advert it. Trying to make your friends bay the books.
This must be a really poor publisher..?

I will demand the art back as you said.
When they treated me like this.
Have been very faithful to them, almost humble in everything.

I am really bored. I think I could quit illustrating. And do my own things from now.

I wish to put their name here to warn everyone to work for them.

Karin

AFM159
12-13-2004, 10:29 AM
Karin - I am so sorry for your troubles. It's no fun when something like this happens. I myself spent nearly five years in a work-for-hire situation, and came out of it without a single piece of artwork for my portfolio!

It seems it is a lesson we all must learn. The hard way.

I've said before that work-for-hire can be a good thing, but you have to know what you're getting into upfront. Sometimes the experience is worth the hassles.

The best advice I can give, is to try your best to just move on. You learned a lesson about dealing with pulishers, you learned about freelancing, and you spent several months doing work you loved. That's good experience. Experience you can build on.

Try and look at the positive side and move on.

Best of Luck.

HRobinson
12-27-2004, 06:13 PM
My daughter went for a job interview. They involved many "job applicants" and presented a seminar in regard to selling knives but the only way they could have the job was to invest $600 in the starter set. She felt so dejected when she, i.e., we, couldn't justify spending the $ so that she could "work."

SO, do your own book... you seem intelligent and at the least as capable as them. Also, consider looking for another website to show your stuff. Those others are losers in my opinion. Plus, if you're still feeling bad PM me so I can tell you my problems. You'll need a gallon of coffee and a lot of time. :)

-Harry

artbird
12-29-2004, 06:27 PM
Hi,

What exactly do you mean by 'work for hire'? Sorry to be dim, but I'm just learning!

KanuK
12-30-2004, 07:02 PM
Hi,

What exactly do you mean by 'work for hire'? Sorry to be dim, but I'm just learning!


Artbird....the answer to your question is explained in the thread here...
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=236661

Scroll through the posts on the above thread (link) and you will find a great explanation by drowningcreek

hope this helps ...

KanuK

artbird
01-02-2005, 06:24 PM
Thanks, I understand now. Will avoid it, I think!

coolray
01-12-2005, 05:25 PM
Karin,

Work for hire is not always a bed of roses. It always has the potential to keep us in the red, and usually reaps little reward. That is not to say you should give up this aspect of illustration, but please research your potential clients. It is always good to check out the background of any company that you wish to work with, and to read the contract completely. If there are any discrepancies, work them out ahead of time.

This is normal for all illustrators. We sometimes strike it good, and come out on top, but other times we are struggling to work around the company's schedule, and their price set.

I hope you don't get discouraged by this. Don't let them pull you down. They are only one company out of many, and there is someone for everyone, and that includes you. You will find the perfect match between you and a company that wants your talent. Keep on the positive side!

Terry

tomnackid
02-09-2005, 04:49 PM
What kind of organizations is this anyway? Sounds like a pyramid scheme. Call up your contact there and tell him/her that you are planning on calling your local trade commission (or whatever you have their that sounds official and regulatory in nature). Use phrases like "Now I'ld hate to get lawyers involved..." etc. See how much you can get out of them to shut you up!

tomnackid
02-09-2005, 04:50 PM
What kind of organizations is this anyway? Sounds like a pyramid scheme. Call up your contact there and tell him/her that you are planning on calling your local trade commission (or whatever you have there that sounds official and regulatory in nature). Use phrases like "Now I'ld hate to get lawyers involved..." etc. See how much you can get out of them to shut you up!