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View Full Version : FW ink or just acrylic inks?


Airbrushkarin
12-10-2004, 02:31 PM
Hey all Please give input here. In ab class lastnight we had sort of a debat that might not be solved yet. We want to know if you could use FW inks or any acrylic paint to paint on shirts and fabics. Some ppl said yes for sure becuese they have enough stained cloths to prove it. I love my FW inks and if it is col I would love to do a shirt or 2 with these. Advice please adn thanks in adavance.!

wuf
12-10-2004, 02:59 PM
Ofcourse you can paint anything with the acrylics or acrylic inks, but their colors will probably fade pretty quickly, if you wash the shirts that you have painted with them.. 'Real' fabric paints don't fade that easily, and they are a bit different from normal acrylics or acrylic inks.. At least they smell like ammonia and they have a different kind of texture when they dry :rolleyes:

Well.. I wouldn't paint my t-shirts with acrylic inks :)

UpStateMike
12-10-2004, 03:56 PM
As painters we know when you get some on your clothes, you just got yourself a new pair of paint pants or shirt. Acrylics, which I believe the FW "Inks" are, will adhere, but tend to crack and come off after washing/drying, especially depending upon film thickness. We don't think of acrylics as hard, but compared to a "fabric" paint they are. You can add a heatsettable fabric medium into normal acrylics to make them more pliable and reduce their cracking nature. Some pigments on their own are going to stain the fabric regardless if the actual paint film comes off.

Penny220
12-11-2004, 09:23 AM
Karin,
The only way to know for sure is to spray all of what you have on an old white shirt or sweatshirt, heatset and toss in a HOT water wash and HOT drier. Spray your paint besides the washed samples and see.

Mike says it all. Urathanes will stain your cloths too but it will flake and chip off.

Milo
12-11-2004, 02:22 PM
you might want to add some GAC-900 (I will have to go look at the addition number from golden) its a sealer for there paints on fabric. From there page good for there other paints as well.

GAC 900: Increases Launderability of Acrylic Paint.

Designed to be used as a modifier for acrylic paints for painting on clothing. See the GOLDEN Fabric Application Information Sheet for more extensive information.
Offers a soft, pliable feel and when properly heat-set, provides excellent laundering stability.
Blend with GOLDEN Heavy Body, Matte or Fluid Acrylics for brush or screen application.
Mix with GOLDEN Airbrush Colors for "Tie-Dye" effects.
Note: The heat-setting process will release low levels of formaldehyde; therefore it is imperative that adequate ventilation be provided.

http://www.goldenpaints.com/products/medsadds/polymers/index.php

Now weather this would help on the FW inks I don't know.

UpStateMike
12-17-2004, 11:05 AM
The GAC 900 is a good product to make "non-fabric" paints into fabric paints. If you think about it, canvas is just a heavywieght cotton fabric, so adhesion isn't the issue, but being able to stand up to repeated wash and dry cycles is key.

I would not believe there is any compability problems between most brands of acrylics, but if you start mixing two products together and the feel of them gets wierd, such as smooth paints become like cottage cheese, you might want to not use the blends for anything other than experimenting or as in the holiday season, gift giving.

In any case, very hot water softens acrylics, and in the ring cycle the softer acrylic films are easier to abrade off of the garment, which is why I suggest these laundering tips for "wearable art"

1) for maximum life, hand wash with a gentle soap, and air dry.
2) If you disregard tip number one, wash garment with other soft fabrics, and not any blue jeans or other abrasive items.
3) Turn the shirt inside out before washing. This helps reduce the abrasion.
4) Avoid letting a garment "bake" in the drier. This means, once it's dry, take it out.

If you can't do these suggestions, don't be upset when the image fades. I have also noted that sometimes the paint isn't fading, but it's the nap of the shirt that starts to raise, exposing unpainted fabric - aka fuzzies.