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Nacre
12-09-2004, 08:15 PM
Recieved this via e mail ,dont know if it is really out of Ppoular mechanics or or just a joke ,but if it actually is taken out of the 1954 mag . than someone sure missed the mark in predicting the future. As with all emailings perhaps most have already seen this. I got a chuckle out of it.

Pic . taken out of the 1954 Popular Mechanics Magazine.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Dec-2004/28847-computer.jpg

Scientists from the Rand Corporation have created this model to illustrate how a " home computer " could look like in the year 2004 . However the needed technology will not be economically feasible for the average home. Also the scientists readily admit that the computer will require not yet invented technology to actually work, but 50 years from now scientific progress is expected to solve these problems. with teletype interface and the fortran language , the computer will be easy to use.

I wonder where one would put it. :D Not on ones lap.

Starsprite
12-09-2004, 08:55 PM
LOL...it even has a steering wheel!!! :)

laudesan
12-09-2004, 09:57 PM
Gives new meaning to the 'puta room.......:)

Thanks Aunt P for sharing and the smile it gave..:)

maltman
12-09-2004, 09:57 PM
But that is my computer

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Dec-2004/48302-28847-computer_copy.jpg

Nacre
12-09-2004, 10:12 PM
What is the steering wheel for Malty??

dcorc
12-09-2004, 10:16 PM
What is the steering wheel for Malty??

Isn't it obvious that it's to control the flow of coolant for all the thermionic valves?

:p Dave

NHArtist6
12-09-2004, 10:27 PM
This turns out to be a fake. I don't have the site reference anymore, but my wife's cousin sent this to me and then sent me the address of the site that exposed the fake. The picture is from a submarine control station from the SS Nautilus era with images of a 1950's TV and an old IBM terminal superimposed. Anyone who has been around long enough will recognize those parts (all except Maltman, of course!) Sorry! I suspect that one could find the site with a little Googing effort.

John

Brian Barnes
12-09-2004, 10:47 PM
The steering wheel is for video games they envisioned. :D

And that was their vision of a computer geek? :(

No, this is actually a picture taken of the piloting station in one of Canada's new submarines purchased from Britain. ;) I'm surprised the image wasn't kept top secret.

BrianB

mr sandbanx
12-09-2004, 10:50 PM
My computer has a seatbelt...

Maybe Pat could get this for her son in lieu of that Playstation Slimline PS2 she is cray-ving.

And why is President Eisenhower standing there?

When I was born in 1956... this was posted on the internet:
Mom and dad are thrilled to announce the arrival of thier son, Sandbanx.
Scientists predict that little Sandbanx will one day have a caddy who looks like this...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Dec-2004/31024-caddy3.jpg

they were pretty close. Scary actually

CharM
12-10-2004, 06:09 AM
LOL... even if the pic is a fake, it's fun...

It's hard for my children to imagine that we didn't own a TV until I was 10 years old... that I went to a one-room school house and we didn't have calculators let alone computers... games were something we played out of doors...

In 1969, I started working full time... the first time I saw a computer, I was awed... it filled a climate controlled room... made whirring noises with lights flashing... we fed it punch cards so it could calculate our requirements... over night...

Malty... you need to upgrade to something a little more portable... :evil:

Chris... in 1956, the *net* was something used to retrieve your fish from the lake... :D

And, Brian, why I think it might be one of our new/old submarines... no wonder they catch fire... :D

Europa
12-10-2004, 07:13 AM
LOL - oh am sure our Jamie would love this though it's not exactly slimline is it.....lol.

I remember when I first started working in the civil service we used to have what was called a 'punch' room - this wasn't a room to take obstructive clients to to sort them out - it was were we used to process the claims using punch cards - how things have changed.

I like this latest invention though - very apt methinks - remote control for a man.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Dec-2004/29499-menremot.jpg

Such simple creatures and so easily pleased - God bless their little cotton socks!! :evil: :p

Pat

Kate Mc
12-10-2004, 08:02 AM
......with.... the fortran language , the computer will be easy to use.

ROFL! This is how we know it's a fake. Anyone who had to learn Fortran would know that it's NOT easy!!






Kate, who first learned to program in assembler language

Nacre
12-10-2004, 10:44 AM
As a Star trek fan I have wondered if it was actually a photo of the Star Ship Enterprise :D :p . Hmmmmn... wonder why Malty is there ?????????
where is Jean Luc ??????

Kate , ( I must ask a stupid ?) what exactaly is fortran language?????? never heard of it.

Kate Mc
12-10-2004, 02:02 PM
.....Kate , ( I must ask a stupid ?) what exactaly is fortran language?????? never heard of it.

No questions are stupid, AuntP. You know that! Fortran was one of the first "higher level" programming languages for computers. It let you use something that looked like words instead of 1s and 0s (which are the "words" that computers use). I think that Fortran stands for something like FORmula TRANslating language or something like that. It was used mostly for scientific applications. Statistics and such.....

It wasn't very easy to use or to speak. The next level language was BASIC (Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code) I spoke that too. Computers are MUCH easier now than they were then!



Kate

JustjoGA
12-10-2004, 02:26 PM
In 1969, I started working full time... the first time I saw a computer, I was awed... it filled a climate controlled room... made whirring noises with lights flashing... we fed it punch cards so it could calculate our requirements... over night... CharM

LOL... Char beat me to it... I worked for Wal-Mart in the late 60s/70s and our computer room was a huge climate controlled room filled with ceiling high equipment, and zillions of punch cards ... there was a group of ladies who did nothing but run punch cards all day ... (can you say boring!?)...

Jo in Georgia

Starsprite
12-10-2004, 02:56 PM
But that is my computer

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Dec-2004/48302-28847-computer_copy.jpg


LOL Malty!!!!! It looks like you are "beaming" yourself up!! :D

NodakerDeb
12-10-2004, 03:12 PM
This may be the site you are looking for:

http://www.snopes.com/

When I'm in doubt about the validity of something, I put it through the Snopes Detector :)

Deb

Nacre
12-10-2004, 04:28 PM
Kate , Thanks for the info re . Fortran language etc. Very interesting. Computers are so facinating . I have been taking a course at the college here to learn HTML and am finding that quite interesting . Must do some research on how the computer has evolved over the years , all I know now is that it went from big to small.

Thanks Deb for the snoopy site http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Dec-2004/28847-snoopy.gif going to check it out now.

maltman
12-10-2004, 07:26 PM
Scientists predict that little Sandbanx will one day have a caddy who looks like this...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Dec-2004/31024-caddy3.jpg

they were pretty close. Scary actually

when you consider........

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Dec-2004/48302-31024-bricaddy3_copy.jpg

Yorky
12-11-2004, 03:23 AM
LOL Pearl, this reminds me of my very first computer - a home built Nascom 1 with 1K of memory (8 1K bit chips) which I built in 1980. (I was an electronics hobbyist).

Warning - geek code

We programmed it direct from the op-code book, turning the 0's and 1's into hex code on a pocket calculator. We were over the moon when we expanded it to 32k, got a Basic interpreter and a tape interface. Until then everything we typed in was lost when we turned off the computer :rolleyes: We eventually used a GPO Teletype machine as a printer - it weighed a ton, used rolls of pink paper like a fax machine and made a terrific racket in the back bedroom.

OK it was a real cranky beginning, but meant that I have unique insight into how computers work and can only be amazed at the way home computing has developed in the past 25 years.

Doug

Kate Mc
12-11-2004, 03:50 AM
LOL, Doug, I have almost the same experience!! I was in Grad school in the mid-70s (at Tennessee, GO VOLS), and doing lab research in Psychology. We built a computer (a PDP-8) to run the interfaces and replace the relay racks we had been using up till that time. I remember coming in every morning and booting the monster up in hex code. Then we could load BASIC (NINE K BASIC, the newest!) on a paper tape reader. Every time we changed an experiment we had to work out the new program in BASIC and re-program. Sigh....to be honest, the relay racks were easier! :rolleyes:

I recently saw a PDP-8 in the Smithsonian museum, as an example of early computers!!

LOL, I've never been without a computer ever since that time. More than 25 years.




Kate