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Jim
12-08-2004, 08:16 AM
I still to this date have not been fortunate enough to be a part of an Art show, and would truly like to be.
There is an annunal Outdoor Show which is held every Sept. very near me and every time it nears I realize that I have nothing to show/sell.
I've painted and sold several pieces throughout the year but have nothing left to bring to a show.
This year i've decided to give it more than a college try and get mega-serious about entering this particular show as well as of course building a collection of my work to bring to a show.
Most everyone at this show seemed to use either an EZ-up or a Caravan (brand names) type shelter in which to display their work.
I've searched around on Ebay and found several tent options which would work for me but would like to hear from folks about what they use for outdoor shows, to show off their wares.
http://store1.yimg.com/I/acecanopy_1818_109666

I'm also very concerned about the walls which I've seen some have a grid system of sorts that allow vendors to hang their paintings on the walls for display...both inside and outside of the shelter.
Does anyone have any info on the type of grid wall I'm trying to describe here?
thanks for your help.

nailbender
12-08-2004, 09:04 AM
Jim, before you buy a booth/tent. Be sure and check with the exibit folks about the size and booth space. Here most booth spaces are 10x10 feet. But some are different.
For a display I use 4x7 1/2 feet vinyl lattice with a 1x2inch frame henged together with 3 1/2 inch door henges (so they can be taken apart by pulling the pins). I use 3 panels henged together.
The e-z up with the roll up sides seems to be the most popular here.

Bob

Jim
12-08-2004, 09:31 AM
Wow, great idea Bob :clap:
I guess now I'll have to check out if Home Depot has the materials I need for constructing these display panels.
I'm guessing that I can staple the pieces of lattice to the 1x2 frame (on both sides?)
If I take my time and am careful, I should have something suitable built by next Sept :D

Yes, 10'x10' seems to be the standard size for sections allotted for artists to show their work.

Thanks Bob :wave:

andymathis
12-08-2004, 11:20 AM
I purchased a heavy duty EZ up with a vinyl top about 9 years ago- It came from EZ up display systems somewhere out west. I found the ad in sunshine Artist. This one is heavy but I can set it up by myself if I have to. A lot of people also like the one called Craft Hut or Flourish, I think- they are very secure,but a bit more difficult to put up, in my opinion.

My tent sides have a mesh panel sewn to them so I can hang artwork directly to it- the con of this is the sides have to be down and this limits visibility a bit, but I dont have to haul an extra system to display with.

You can order those wire panels from www.graphicdisplaysystems.com out of Penn.

Jim
12-08-2004, 11:57 AM
Thanks for the link Andy, that was what I was looking for.
After browsing the site though and checking prices for what I'd be needing,
I came to the conclusion that I'd be better off constructing my own.
My total was up to $900 and I still wasn't finished shopping when I realized this :eek:

drowningcreek
12-08-2004, 06:38 PM
http://www.flourish.com/trimline.htm

Best vending tent ever. Built with artists in mind, the tents are sturdy enough to withstand very windy and/or rainy conditions.

We weathered a storm with gusts of 55mph winds this summer. The other vendors did not fair so well.... when the wind & rain stopped, and we peeked out of our tent, there were EZ ups mangled all around us. Of course, these were not the heavier duty EZ ups.

We purchased the optional mesh walls for our tent, and they will hold framed prints w/ glass no problem. It takes approx 30-40 minutes for 2 people to put up. The main frame structure can also be used without the vinyl covers for indoor vending events, and the flaps can be locked at night when they are zipped down for multiple day events.

And no, I don't work for Flourish, but I darned sure highly recommend them!

nailbender
12-09-2004, 09:13 AM
Jim
Since you are interested in the display, I will explain it futher.
The 1x2inch fram is only on one side of the lattice work. I used 1 inch drywall screws to ancor the lattice to the frame. The frame needs 4 sides and at least 3 cross pieces. I used 3 1/2 inch drywall screws and carpenters glue to put the frame together. All the cuts need to be as square as possible. (Using a miter saw if you have one available.) The only problem I have had with this is, the vinyl lattice and the wood expands and contracts at a little different rate and it buckles just a little. Be sure to paint the frame before you put the lattice on it. These 3 - 4 foot panels cost about $55 to construct.
Home depot should have all this stuff. Hope this helps.

Bob

Jim
12-09-2004, 10:34 AM
Thanks for the additional info Bob, I was interested.

I was thinking though that maybe two set-ups as you've described might be better. I mean with each wall measuring 4 feet wide if I had two of them side-by-side that'd still be small enough to keep inside the shelter (after buttoning on the outside walls) if any rain should decide to dampen the show.
They could also be set-up back-to-back (in an H pattern) for another display possibility and still remain protected within the confines of a 10x10 area.
I wonder if there's such a thing as plastic/vinyl 1x2's to reduce the expansion/contraction factor?
Does pressure-treated lumber expand/contract?

Anyhow, thanks for the info Bob and everyone else too.
The links that everyone has placed within this post were wonderful, though not what I had expected price-wise. I should be able to put together something that won't scare away the general public :D

REDart
12-14-2004, 06:12 PM
You might check with the show first to see if they have any requirements about the set up. Some shows now want to see proof of fire retardent materials used etc...

When I planned to do my first show I mentioned the display wall problem to a few artist friends of mine, they made a phone call to another friend who had an extra set of display panels around (artists that do a lot of shows tend to upgrade and we are are all bad at getting rid of things) later I bought a used display tent from one of them. Before i asked I didn't even know these people had done shows. Also, you might be able to rent a tent from a rental company, to see if you like doing shows before you put too much money out.

It seems that artists that like doing shows and travel to do them, soon upgrade to the best and most profesional displays they can get.

Also the forum section of the sunshine artist website has info on tents and panels, some homemade. And info on tie-downs and weights.

good luck

ledogartist
12-16-2004, 10:00 AM
I started with an EZ up, and looked around at other folks. The Caravan seemed to be the tent of choice and got high reviews from the other vendors, they said Caravan had looked at the competitiors and taken the best features to combine in their new tent. For me weight and ease of set up is important, as I'm one middle aged woman with tendonitis :-). I love the zip sides, which I can configure many different ways, depending on the weather conditions.

As far as a good way to display my artwork, I'm still working on that and am also open to suggestions, as my work in mostly on tables now. I'd like to get it on walls, but am still trying to figure out how.

I sell canvas prints, so they are stretched, and in their clearbags for protection. So I'm still trying to work out a lightweight easy to set, doesn't take a lot of room when travelling, way to display these stretched canvas prints in clearbags. So if anyone has a great suggestion for that I would love to hear.

Cheers,

Karen

King Rundzap
12-16-2004, 07:16 PM
I still to this date have not been fortunate enough to be a part of an Art show, and would truly like to be.
There is an annunal Outdoor Show which is held every Sept. very near me and every time it nears I realize that I have nothing to show/sell.
I've painted and sold several pieces throughout the year but have nothing left to bring to a show.
This year i've decided to give it more than a college try and get mega-serious about entering this particular show as well as of course building a collection of my work to bring to a show.
Most everyone at this show seemed to use either an EZ-up or a Caravan (brand names) type shelter in which to display their work.
I've searched around on Ebay and found several tent options which would work for me but would like to hear from folks about what they use for outdoor shows, to show off their wares.
http://store1.yimg.com/I/acecanopy_1818_109666

I'm also very concerned about the walls which I've seen some have a grid system of sorts that allow vendors to hang their paintings on the walls for display...both inside and outside of the shelter.
Does anyone have any info on the type of grid wall I'm trying to describe here?
thanks for your help.

I use the standard white 10' x 10' EZ-Up tent. I haven't had any problems with it so far, and it's true to it's name--easy to set up and take down. The main disadvantage is that they're not cheap (although they're a lot cheaper than, say, Craft Hut), and they're not very light or small. One person can carry them if they're strong enough, but it's even more difficult for me, because at the moment I'm in a walk-up apartment, so I have to lug it up and down staircases.

For gridwall, just look for any Business to Business retail display distributor. To fill three sides of a 10' x 10' space, you'll need 12 2' wide gridwall panels. Make sure you get the T-legs, not the L-legs, as the T-legs are far more stable (the L-legs at an outdoor show can particularly be a disaster). You only need one set of legs per two panels. Use three of the panel connectors (they're small, rectanguler hinges that tighten with a screw and hex wrench) to attach two panels. I use Gerschel Brothers in Philadelphia for Gridwall, but you'll need to buy them from someplace local and pick them up if you can, because shipping for them will be outrageous--they're pretty heavy, believe it or not. Also, make sure you measure your vehicle. I had to buy the 5' tall gridwall panels, because my SUV is too small to fit the 6' panels.

There are other options, too, but gridwall is one of the cheaper ways to go (though still not cheap) for art. Plus it's really easy to hang works from them--just get the gridwall hooks, and you can easily hang and change your set up, and they're very sturdy, as long as you get the T-legs and set the wall in the legs properly. Depending on the size of the work you do, you'll probably need between 6 and 24 works to hang on the gridwall to make a decent looking display. 6 if your works are really big -- at least 36" x 36". 24 if you do a lot of stuff that's say, 16" x 20" or smaller. You can estimate for a variety of sizes based on that.

Also, make sure you set up your tent (there are some assembly aspects that you'll have to only do the first time) and your gridwall at home before you get to your first show. You don't want to be scrambling on the first morning of the show, wondering how to put it all together, when you've got to be ready for the public in 40 minutes.

brushandknife
12-31-2004, 09:38 AM
I'm in the same spot you are- new to this, wanting to do the outdoor show at a local one, etc. I did do some preliminary footwork and got lucky on the panels. Boughten ones gave me "sticker shock". Found a gal who was upgrading and she sold hers (which she'd bought used too) to me. I got a good deal and feel very lucky. You may want to do some "footwork" too. Go to some shows and start talking. I found all the folks I talked to very friendly and helpful. Looked at all the homemade ones I could find, thinking I was going to do that. I've come to find the best advice to be "talk to as many people as you can". More ideas, help, etc. Then you can sort it all out for yourself. My 2 cents worth. Good luck. I'll be thinking of you as I wade through my own questions! Carol

CaseyBexar
12-31-2004, 02:27 PM
http://www.flourish.com/trimline.htm

Best vending tent ever. Built with artists in mind, the tents are sturdy enough to withstand very windy and/or rainy conditions.

We weathered a storm with gusts of 55mph winds this summer. The other vendors did not fair so well.... when the wind & rain stopped, and we peeked out of our tent, there were EZ ups mangled all around us. Of course, these were not the heavier duty EZ ups.

We purchased the optional mesh walls for our tent, and they will hold framed prints w/ glass no problem. It takes approx 30-40 minutes for 2 people to put up. The main frame structure can also be used without the vinyl covers for indoor vending events, and the flaps can be locked at night when they are zipped down for multiple day events.

And no, I don't work for Flourish, but I darned sure highly recommend them!

I have the "Trimline" from Flourish also - and absolutely LOVE LOVE LOVE it! I also have the stabilizer bars and mesh panels. I paid my dues with the cheapy Caravan pop-up and trying to figure an inexpensive display walls/curtains. After 1.5 years, it began sagging, leaking in weird areas, the Velcro fell apart and I was always scared ****less that my tent would not make it through the night due to a storm or gust of wind. God must have really been looking out for me because it had rained at almost every show I have done.
Do yourself a favor - beg, barrow or steal the money and get a decent tent. Get some decent weights and pegs. Nail or screw yourself down. I have been at too many shows where tents were destroyed and blown away. and even tents that were properly weighted damaged because a cheapy Pop up blew into theirs.

I have other artists come in my booth just to know where I got my tent from. Seriously. It will save you time and give you piece of mind in the future. The pop ups are scary.

Good Luck!