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kiwicockatoo
11-16-2001, 06:54 PM
went to an art show recently. I noticed that a lot of oils had shiny spots. One artist in particular had subjects that were very shiny, while the background was matte. I can understand if a painting's surface is shiny all over, but I found the effect very distracting because from even a slight angle her subjects disappeared in a glare while the backgrounds were still clear. I'm completely unfamiliar with oils so I was just wondering if this is normal, or should a painting be varnished or something so the surface is consistant?
Just curious,
Brenda

belladonna
11-17-2001, 12:17 AM
The painting probably was not dry enough to varnish before the show. I switched to a matt medium because of the same thing. Now my work shows well varnished or not, with out the patchy appearance. It is patchy because the artist used more medium in some areas than others. Can be corrected by varnishing.

Leopoldo1
11-17-2001, 10:57 AM
Originally posted by kiwicockatoo
but I found the effect very distracting because from even a slight angle her subjects disappeared in a glare while the backgrounds were still clear. I'm completely unfamiliar with oils so I was just wondering if this is normal, or should a painting be varnished or something so the surface is consistant?


This seems to be one of the many problems that needs to be solved in oil painting. The nature of individual pigments themselves creates sunken and shiny areas depending how they dry with the oil vehicles and this reason is why varnish is applied to unify the overall surface so viewers have an cohesiveness. Of course protection of paint film? Nothing is more distrubing then to see shiny and dull areas, glare and no glare on a nice piece of art. One way, as belladonna pointed out is to understand your pigments well enough by mixing medium before hand into each one and hopefully one will achieve overall unification when everything is dry. I like the medium of Maroger for this reason and have found that when using it I seldom need to varnish afterwards.

Varnishing is tricky in itself and one can ruin alot of hard work in short time on a painting in what seems to be an easy application of damar. It needs to be warmed, thinly and rapidly applied with a very good varnish brush, otherwise it builds up and looks like a glazed donut waiting to be eating at ones local coffee shop. When I do varnish, I no longer use damar straight but ad beeswax to it for a more matte varnish, a more pleasing look from many angles as opposed to being limited with the glare of shiny damar. I personally do not like shiny paintings, it cheapens it. Be carefully with damar, practice with recipes and applications on test swatches before the final appication. :oL

vallarta
11-17-2001, 03:37 PM
Most shine can be eliminated if you do the following:

When you start in the morning....repainting a picture...pour a bit of lindseed oil on a soft cloth...then rub it over the picture...then using your hand...to warm the lindseed oil...rub it over the picture. Rub the entire picture and then begin painting.

The picture will be even in shine. Carry on painting on the surface. Do this each time you restart and you should have an even surface when finished.

vallarta

kiwicockatoo
11-17-2001, 03:46 PM
Thanks everyone. I was worried that I was being overly nit picky. I saw a lot of this at this show. The one artist I metioned was the only one doing figurative work and in particular I thought it marred my enjoyment of her work. The paintings were all set up in booths in such a way that you could walk around each exhibit and it was really noticable - something I would not want in my own work.

Hopefully I will be getting some oils for xmas(I'm working exclusively in cp right now) and will be able to bug you all with more questions!

goss
11-19-2001, 12:33 PM
Originally posted by vallarta
Most shine can be eliminated if you do the following:

When you start in the morning....repainting a picture...pour a bit of lindseed oil on a soft cloth...then rub it over the picture...then using your hand...to warm the lindseed oil...rub it over the picture. Rub the entire picture and then begin painting.

The picture will be even in shine. Carry on painting on the surface. Do this each time you restart and you should have an even surface when finished.

vallarta



Vallarta, will oiling out before you apply varnish in the end achieve the same result as what you just explained? Will Safflower oil work the same as linseed oil? And if you do it before each painting session how will that effect the fat over lean principle?

vallarta
11-19-2001, 06:29 PM
You need to replace oils that sink into the surface.....If you reoil the picture each time you paint you are replacing what has been lost. You don't leave it "dripping."! When you use your hands to rub the oil...and warm it...then you let it sit a moment and then remove all the excess with a absorbent cloth/paper. There will still be a trace of oil on the surface which makes it fine to carry on painting. You may find you don't need medium ...or very little...since the surface will be slick. This takes care of the fat over lean problem.

vallarta