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Andrew Rance
12-05-2004, 06:48 PM
MY IMAGE(S):
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/upload_spool/12-05-2004/27523_venicebig-599a.jpg


GENERAL INFORMATION:
Title: Venice Canal Scene
Year Created: 2004
Medium: Oil
Surface: Canvas
Dimension: 36 x 28
Allow digital alterations?: Yes!

MY COMMENTS:
Quite large, by my standards - painting knives only.

MY QUESTIONS FOR THE GROUP:
?

Tamana
12-05-2004, 08:05 PM
Ah...sigh. Andrew...I ALWAYS look forward to traveling to Venice via your renditions. The white outline of bridge and the gondola provides a good balance against the stairwell to the right of the bridge, especially with that crimson. The touches of lavender on the high viewer's left wall would provide a better balance I think without such on the distant building between them. The green on the distant is lovely though...

It seems the composition as a whole is leaning to the right a tad? Is that just me?

Michael-Ann
12-05-2004, 09:16 PM
A source of dreams...this is such a beautiful place...I can't think of one single crit. The water is wonderful, the painting as a whole has a certain "dank" quality that puts me right there.

takeshi iwasawa
12-05-2004, 09:39 PM
Hi Andrew, :wave: Love the rich texture and the color you used.
Nothing to critique here...just admiration and appraisal, Good job! :clap:

dornberg
12-05-2004, 11:20 PM
i like the feel of color and oil

LisaArt
12-06-2004, 05:29 AM
A source of dreams...this is such a beautiful place...I can't think of one single crit. The water is wonderful, the painting as a whole has a certain "dank" quality that puts me right there.

Hi Andrew, I agree with Michael-Ann.
Curious How long did this painting take you?

Andrew Rance
12-07-2004, 09:35 AM
Tamana - thanks - I think I agree with your perceptions about the colour.

Michael-Ann/Dornberg - your comments are appreciated (hadn't thought of "dank", but it seems a pretty appropriate description ;)

Takeshi - Greetings and thank you!

Lisa - thanks - about 12 hours, spread over the past fortnight (I rarely manage to get more than an hour or so at my easel, due to other commitments :( )

hward
12-07-2004, 10:43 AM
I lived in Italy for 8 months during the 4th grade. Your painting agrees with my memories. Italians are free-hearted and elegant at once.

During the medieval period, the Middle East was culturally superior in many ways to Europe. For example, "algebra" ("al gebra") is derived from Arabic. So is our modern word for guitar repairman, "luthier" ("al oud" = wood).

Trade cities such as Venice served as a conduit between the Middle East and the more primitive Europe, and were very cosmopolitan.

Spyderbabe
12-07-2004, 11:19 AM
Very nice handling of water and texture.

Wayne Gaudon
12-07-2004, 12:07 PM
very beautiful colors and handling .. especially like the water treatment.

angela
12-07-2004, 12:23 PM
that water is astounding!!!! i love the color and composition, but my favorte part of this is definitely the water...and all with knives? wow!

Moosehead
12-07-2004, 12:39 PM
Fantastic!

Myclaugh
12-07-2004, 05:10 PM
Beautiful scene Andrew. Wonderfully textured and colored; it feels as though you really captured it.

This may be picky, but I do think the perspective may be off a bit- a least to my eye with the image I am seeing on my screen. It looks like everything is tilting a little to the right. Especially take a close look at the windows along the back - and the windows on the building at the left- it seems that the line of these windows is leaning a little right of perpidicular; which is giving the whole scene a right tilt feel. Also there's something about the brown ledgy area with columns on the left that also doesn't feel right with regards to perspective.

Thanks for posting- really beautiful to look at.

Mikey
12-07-2004, 08:26 PM
Andrew,

I think that this is a very good painting and love the textures. Although those background windows aren't painted particularly loosely the lighter colour makes them very acceptable for me. True, the perspective is off and you would probably have to do an architectural drawing to a vanishing point to get it absolutely right. This might have lost you for a more creative approach with the brush/knife, which you certainly do have and I think the important thing is to ask if the painting comes together as a whole. I think it does.

Mikey