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roachford
12-04-2004, 02:40 PM
I'd be interested in what anyones thoughts were as to this piece.

AriadneArts
12-04-2004, 02:57 PM
Hi Roach, and welcome to WC and to the Ab/Con forum.

I'd encourage you to keep on keepin' on. I hesitate to say this, but you asked for critique. This piece is a bit blah to me, there is no focal point, no texture, no gradation of color and only one color. Too minimalist for me, I'm afraid. But that's just my opinion. Other's may have different reactions to it.

Smileawhyl
12-04-2004, 03:40 PM
I agree with Eileen regarding it being a bit too minimalist. Were this a huge piece, I'd be more compelled to consider its overall aura. However, I can look at it and imagine an overall feeling were I seeing it soar on a very large, open wall. I can see myself lingering to contemplate it in that environment.

ArtistJensen
12-04-2004, 03:48 PM
It's very minimalistic. I'm not sure if a digital image like this is telling the truth about the original. I would like to know what medium it is and how big etc. Some closeups would maybe give us a better clue about the overall structure and aura of the painting. I suspect that the original has more aura than this small digital image.

Mary Woodul
12-04-2004, 05:28 PM
I agree with Smileawhyl, if it is a large painting on la large wall and an open space it would greatly attract me. I love red and I love minimalism.

roachford
12-04-2004, 07:08 PM
Thanks mlelevier. The piece is about 6ft by 4.5ft approx. The digital image really doesnt convey whats going on, on the canvas. I'm not so sure that asking for opinions on my work is such a good idea over the web as the discreet nuances and variances of the shades and colours are rarely represented well via digi photo. I've had about 20 different opinions on what different people can see in it and its always interesting as to what will emerge next.

True, the panel is minimal, but thats the style in which most of my work emerges. Its an honest statement. And thanks to you other fine folks for your views, they are all very welcome!

Roach

Tamana
12-05-2004, 10:14 AM
That's a pretty good size. Photographing art is tricky at best...especially if you don't have a good camera or scanner (which in your case the work size exceeds a scanner). I think if you're going to show art over the net then learning how to photograph it is just as important as making it. I don't know how you photograph, but I'm always outside at a certain time in a certian spot in morning shade. Took me a bit and a lot of exprimentation to find the right spot, but once found it was no longer an issue.

I've been through it with bad photos let me tell ya -- they REALLY don't do art justice. Another good thing to do for sizes such as this is to add a perspective shot, too, eg. - of it hanging on the wall in its environment. That would give a good idea as well.

I don't know if I'd give up showing because you really get some wonderful advice here. But you're right about the photography and it wouldn't do you really any good without adequate photos.

Pilan
12-05-2004, 12:08 PM
The way the reds and blacks are in the painting, have made the red sort of calming. I think making a red calming is pretty tricky. It would definately need a special arrangement around it in a room or an open area to show this painting to its greatest strength.


I love it :clap:


Tamana has a great suggestion. Photograph it in a room in a setting to show the perspective and how it looks against the furniture etc. Then show close ups for details.

Touching on the way others have given feedback etc. showing your work on the internet. You have to continually to take into consideration that everyone person you show your art work will not understand it nor like it, or the style. This is just a part of showing your work. I prefer to think and try to see in a broad perspective, although I may not be completely able to accomplish. Like myself most people have their likes and dislikes in styles and it is hard to push past it and get a rounded opinion from one person. So, take these feedbacks and remember its what you love to do and getting feedback is great but it should never get in the way of showing your work to others for feedback.

It is important to you and it is you and showing your work exposes others to this style of art. See, we are continually teaching others.

Your not the only one to have ever felt this way. Show more of your work and don't stop, don't let the less than praise or feedback keep you down or back.

Have a great day. :)

shinobi
12-05-2004, 01:27 PM
Big. Minimalist. Red. Like it, I do.

roachford
12-05-2004, 04:03 PM
Thanks guys. Pilan, shinobi and Tamana, your words are good advice. I'll certainly give a little more thought on the photo process before I post further images.

The emptiness of my work is an integral part of what I'm trying to achieve. I have always been minimal, but the challenge for me is painting something that:

a) is minimal in content

b) moves something within the observer

c) I feel is a truly honest piece with as little external influence as is possible. A point that could be discussed forever, under a seperate 'exostentialism' thread.

muchfoolishness
12-05-2004, 05:40 PM
its quite red

roachford
12-06-2004, 03:18 AM
Its not red enough......

artamust
12-06-2004, 01:36 PM
The emptiness of my work is an integral part of what I'm trying to achieve. I have always been minimal, but the challenge for me is painting something that:

a) is minimal in content

b) moves something within the observer

c) I feel is a truly honest piece with as little external influence as is possible. A point that could be discussed forever, under a seperate 'exostentialism' thread.

I once saw a painting in a similar style at the Ringling Museum in Sarasota, FL. I'm not sure that it was a part of their permanent exhibit and don't remember the artist's name. It was painted on a support approximately the size of yours. The painting was nothing more than a flat, consistent field of light, almost iridescent blue. It was placed in the exhibit so that the viewer had to turn a corner to see it - thus giving an immediate impact and demanding an immediate reaction. I saw it about 30 years ago and remember it still. Maybe this fits the criteria you listed above.

I have one suggestion. I think that even with minimalism there are ways to work interest into the piece - whether it be bold application of color or some other design element. I notice that your painting has an exclusively vertical thrust. That is - the support is vertically oriented as are the brush strokes. It might be a bit more interesting if one or the other of these elements were horizontally oriented. Or, even include some horizontal brushstrokes into what you already have.

I think you're on to something with this. I hope you will post more of your work. It would be interesting to see how you progress.

Steve

roachford
12-07-2004, 05:34 AM
Steve,

Glad you like it. The work thats emerging at the moment has variances of a vertical theme and one in particular has some subtle focal points that I'm still not sure about just yet.

I'll post them when complete.

PALudeking
12-07-2004, 04:26 PM
I like it, I sense a lot of movement and character...