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dcorc
12-01-2004, 07:58 AM
Well, here we are, in December already! :eek:

This month, we are looking at Mary Cassatt (1844 - 1926)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Dec-2004/30792-biopic.jpg

and her painting

Child In A Straw Hat c.1886 25.25 x 19.5 inches

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Dec-2004/30792-girlsm.jpg

larger image available here (http://www.dcorc.co.uk/girlinstrawhat.jpg)

Biography (From the WetCanvas Virtual Museum (http://www.wetcanvas.com/Museum/Artists/c/Mary_Cassatt/) )

The most famous female Impressionist painter, Mary Cassatt, was born on 22 May, 1844 in Allegheny, near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The Cassatt family was affluent and cultured: Mary's father was a stockbroker, while her mother, who came from an old established Pennsylvania family, was an accomplished woman who spoke French and read widely, and provided Mary with an excellent example to follow. It is, perhaps, no accident that so many of the women in Mary Cassatt's paintings are engaged in simple, self-contained tasks like reading or sewing, since these were the everyday activities of the Cassatt household.

As a child, Mary traveled widely in Europe, since the family moved from Paris to Heidelberg and Darmstadt in search of a specialist who could help cure her brother Robbie's diseased knee joint, and to find the superior schooling that her brother Alexander needed for his future engineering career. This travel enabled Mary to learn both French and German while she was still young - linguistic skills that were prove immensely useful in later life.

In 1861, when she was sixteen, Mary Cassatt decided to study art seriously and enrolled at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, apparently against the wishes of her father, who thought it inadvisable that she should extend herself beyond the domestic role for which she was intended. She remained there for four years before moving back to Europe with her mother for a two-year stay before the breakout of the Franco-Prussian war. Henceforth, Mary was to spend most of her life in exile from her native country, reflecting a feeling among some women of her generation that Europe offered an escape from what they saw as the oppressive, patriarchal attitudes of America. She was later to say; "After all, give me France. Women do not have to fight for recognition here if they do serious work. I suppose it is Mrs. Potter Palmer's French blood which gives her organizing powers and determination that women should be someone and not something."

On her return to Europe in 1872, Mary Cassatt went to Parma in Italy where she stayed for several months studying the paintings of the Italian Masters Correggio and Parmagianino, and where she may have also studied graphic art with Carlo Raimondi. It says a great deal about the determination of the young artist that she was prepared to brave a somewhat lonely and isolated existence in order to achieve her aim. It is also significant that she should have felt a need to turn to these two particular painters, as they were both masters of the Madonna-and-child theme, and subject paintings of women and children were to prove so critical to her own work. From Parma, the artist went to Madrid, where she spent some time absorbing the lessons of Velazquez in the Prado, and where she painted the Spanish-influenced Torero and a Young Girl. From Madrid, Mary went to Antwerp where she studied the art of Rubens for a time.

Cassatt knew and befriended Edouard Manet. The two artists lived near each other, had mutual friends, and met from time to time. Although she and Manet did not seem to have the same close relationship that she had with Edgar Degas, Cassatt knew him well, and in 1880 even spent the summer with her family at Marly-le-Roi near Manet's villa. She was also highly influenced by his art, and many of her early works show Manet's broad touch and his strong tonal contrasts. She was responsible for sending many of his paintings to America.

The early years in Paris were a particularly happy time for Mary Cassatt, and this gaiety is reflected in the subject matter she chose for her paintings. She depicted young girls setting in the loge at the opera, women taking tea, knitting and reading. Many of her models were drawn from her close family and friends, such as her mother and her sister Lydia, who had moved to Paris to live with her in 1877. On the whole, Cassatt preferred to paint peasant women who took care of their own children, rather than the more affluent mothers who delegated the task to nannies or nursemaids.

In 1891, Mary Cassatt had her first one-woman show at the gallery of Durand-Ruel. The year after, she was invited by Mrs. Potter Palmer to paint the south tympanum in the Women's Building at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago - a commission she gladly accepted, as she had always been a champion of the feminist cause. Her chosen theme was "Modern Woman", which she illustrated with a three-part composition. In the center she showed "Young Women Plucking the Fruits of Knowledge and Science", on the left-hand panel she showed "Young Girls Pursuing Fame", and on the right she depicted the arts of music and dancing. The colors are cheerful, since it was felt that, as the painting was done for a national fete, the mood should be jubilant.

The winter of 1893-1894 found Mary Cassatt in Antibes, recovering from the effort of producing her color prints and the mural for Chicago. It was there she began to paint one of her largest canvases, The Boating Party, which was highly influenced by Manet's painting In the Boat, which she had persuaded the Havemyers to buy for their collection. At the end of the following year, Mary had her second one-woman show at the Galerie Durand-Ruel in Paris, and she bought the Chateau de Beaufresne at Mesnil-Theribus on the Oise, 27 miles from Paris, which was to be her summer home for the rest of her life.

It was not until 1898 that Mary Cassatt visited America for the first time since she had settled in Paris in 1874, in order to see her family and friends. She had delayed her return home until this point partly because she was afraid of sea travel, and also because her ailing parents had needed her to stay with them in Paris. But after her mother died in 1898, there were no close family links to keep her in Europe, and she was free to visit her brothers Gardner and Alexander and their families in Philadelphia and Boston. While in America, Mary Cassatt decided to concentrate on pastels alone, as they were more portable than oils, and therefore more suitable for the journey home. Most of the subjects she painted there were women and children. Her attention was rather diverted from her own work when she returned to Europe; she made an extended visit to Italy with the Havemyers to advise on the purchase of paintings, many of which can now be seen in American museums.

The artist continued to produce a large number of paintings and pastels during the early years of the century, and she managed to preserve her good health and strength until she was in her sixties. However, after a tragic trip to Egypt in 1912 during which her brother Gardner died, she found herself depressed, ill, and unable to work for almost two years. Her eyesight was gradually failing due to inoperable cataracts and because of this, the colors in her pastels became more and more strident and less subtle, although the artist considered them to be her best works. After a last outburst of work in 1913, Mary Cassatt stopped producing pictures almost entirely, and retired to the South of France during the first world war. She lived on in seclusion and virtual blindness, unable to work, until her death in 1926 at the Chateau de Beaufresne.

Resources
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/cast/hd_cast.htm
http://www.nmwa.org/collection/profile.asp?LinkID=128
http://www.mfa.org/exhibitions/cassatt/intro.html
http://www.artrenewal.org/asp/database/art.asp?aid=631

Technique and Palette
Like Thayer, Cassatt had spent some time studying in Paris with Gerome; she then come under the influence of the impressionists - She preferred unposed, asymmetrical compositions, a light, bright palette with strong contours and confident volumes, painting subjects drawn from modern life. Focusing on the domestic and the intimate - among her commonest subjects were children, and pictures of mother and child. These tend to be half-length compositions with little background detail- it has been suggested that Cassatt's depictions may have been attempts to create "modern Madonnaís," contemporary renditions on the timeless theme of new life and maternal love, updating the traditional Madonna-and child formula through gesture and psychological subtlety; compositions were planned meticulously, and her models were not always mother and child.

The brushwork in this painting is broad, probably alla prima, and appears to be in a limited palette. It is probable black is absent. A suggested palette might be white, cadmium yellow light, yellow ochre, cadmium red medium, permanent alizarin crimson, french ultramarine blue, burnt umber.

Mary Cassatt's visit home, long after she had become famous in Europe, was reported in the Philadelphia newspaper as the arrival of "Mary Cassatt, sister of Mr. Cassatt, President of the Pennsylvania Railroad, who has been studying painting in France and owns the smallest Pekingese dog in the world." ! :eek: :crying: :mad:

Dave

Bioartist
12-01-2004, 08:25 AM
OK, I'll bite the bullet and do this one...actually, I like this painting a lot, so it's going to be fun, although I am still working on the October one, oh well, one day I shall catch up :rolleyes: :o :D :rolleyes:
Stacey

DLGardner
12-01-2004, 10:19 AM
I'm in.
Sometime in December. Hopefully I will have time before the end. I have a couple commission pieces (yahoo!) to do right away though.

Its a darling painting and I love the style.

Dianne

WV.Artistry
12-01-2004, 12:03 PM
know any vendors that make a 20x26 inch canvas?

bjs0704
12-01-2004, 03:40 PM
I often re-proportion a painting. I take the size canvas that I want to use and then use a grid that is proportional to my final canvas. I place the grid over the masterwork and draw out my painting. I usually do the drawing in vine charcoal.

Barb Solomon

:cat:

Squib
12-01-2004, 03:56 PM
I definitely want to do this one. I have always liked it - but always thought her hat is rather perched above her head, rather than sitting on it. :confused: Regardless, I will try and get started in a few days. Good luck all.

DLGardner
12-01-2004, 04:46 PM
but always thought her hat is rather perched above her head, rather than sitting on it.
Interesting observation.
With all due respect, Mary Cassatt seems to have an interesting way of wearing her own hat. :)

dcorc
12-01-2004, 04:58 PM
but always thought her hat is rather perched above her head, rather than sitting on it. :confused:

Why does it remind me of this? :D


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Dec-2004/30792-fbplnt.jpg

:p Dave

bjs0704
12-01-2004, 05:46 PM
Since I am going to be moving from Tallahassee to the Chicago area this month, I donít know how far I am going to get. But I want to give it a try and see what I can do!

Dave - LOL!!! Oh that is too much!

I have to agree though! There is something odd about the hat! Maybe she couldnít find the right size! :D

Barb Solomon :cat:

WV.Artistry
12-01-2004, 05:48 PM
Why does it remind me of this? :D



Judy Robinson?

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Dec-2004/53202-judy_robinson.jpg

g7i7n7a
12-03-2004, 04:48 PM
Hello MoM-ers (timid)
I have been lurking for quite awhile, and this seems to be the one to jump in on. I as newbie as they come, so if anyone has the patience to share even their most basic of steps. I will be all ears, and very grateful :)
this is just a sketch, to get warmed up, ( if anything is off, please don't hesitate of share, other than the hat seeming way to big...) something off on the eyes, but can't quite figure what. thankyou all.
gina

maybe I shouldn't worry about that at this point, just get those darn tubes open!!

dcorc
12-03-2004, 07:45 PM
Hi Gina

welcome - no need to be timid! :)

How big's your sketch here?

Dave

bjs0704
12-03-2004, 11:23 PM
Hi Gina! :wave:

Your sketch of the girl is very good!

I usually start with a canvas or panel. I like to do my drawing in vine charcoal. Then I go over the outline with a brown oil paint.

Barb Solomon :cat:

g7i7n7a
12-04-2004, 12:35 AM
Hi Guys,
thankyou for the welcome,
the sketch is just a thumbnail, 6x9 in. (just getting familiar)
I'm thinking of using a 18x24 or maybe a little smaller. (don't really know what i'm doing. :D )gotta jump in somewhere. I'll just be tagging along behind you all, soaking it in...

thankyou barb, I need all tips I can get.
gina

guillot
12-04-2004, 01:32 AM
Oh Boy!!! :clap: :clap: :clap:

The Cassatt !!!

Welcome to the activity Gina!! Looking great so far.

Tina

WV.Artistry
12-04-2004, 05:52 AM
Hi Guys,
I'm thinking of using a 18x24

gina

I'm going to do mine at 18x24 too. I should have some time to start this on Sunday.

Squib
12-06-2004, 03:22 PM
Hi All, :wave:

Dave - LOL

Gina, just paint ! Looking forward to seeing your progress. You will get a lot of help here if you need it.

Richard - waiting to see what you do with this one. I learn so much from watching you.

Here's my start on the poor child with the ridiculously large hat ! No wonder she looks miserable.

Size - 20 x 24. This was an hour this evening. So far I have used tit. white, burnt umber, burnt sienna, and a touch of cad. red on her face. I may have laid it on a bit thick - we'll see. I have used only one brush so far, a large flat (but rather worn) bristle. My plan was alla prima, but I have decided to let this dry a bit (chicken), and carry on again tomorrow. I have decided not to be so fussy about this painting - no pressure on myself at all. I am just going to enjoy sloshing paint around and see what develops.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Dec-2004/35948-strawhat.JPG

WV.Artistry
12-06-2004, 05:44 PM
16x20 Sketch

Roughed in at a sidewalk cafe with a cup of coffee.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Dec-2004/53202-Sketch_16.jpg

artcrazy
12-06-2004, 06:29 PM
great start, you two :D . I'm thinking of jumping in myself

looking forward to updates! :)

Nicole

WV.Artistry
12-06-2004, 06:30 PM
Richard - waiting to see what you do with this one. I learn so much from watching you.

Here's my start on the poor child with the ridiculously large hat ! No wonder she looks miserable.

tit. white
burnt umber
burnt sienna
cad. red


Where'd you get the purple? Nice!

To be honest, the only study I've done on this was while attempting the sketch. I did notice sweeping gestures in some places, but she seems to be using lots of little geometrical shapes. Tapering is done with chicken scratch hits. And she probably dirtied it up "after" painting it . . . I had a composition I tried shoe polish on, same effect. The forehead was pink, and she washed over it when she did the hair, made it dirty.

IMO, some of this reminds me of Frans Hals. It's drawing with paint, not necessarily "painting".

I'll probably start with an oil sketch, burnt umber and turpentine, work out some bugs, and lifting sketch residue in the process.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Dec-2004/53202-2004_12_Cassat_WIP_Sketch.jpg

WV.Artistry
12-06-2004, 06:33 PM
great start, you two :D . I'm thinking of jumping in myself

looking forward to updates! :)

Nicole

Nicole,

Is it St. John or Saint Johns that's in Newfoundland? I had lobster there once -- best I've ever had.

Richard

artcrazy
12-06-2004, 06:40 PM
Richard:
St. John's is in Newfoundland, Saint John in New Brunswick.

lobster...........,mmmmmmmmmmm yummy ;)

Nicole

g7i7n7a
12-06-2004, 06:44 PM
Hi, Guys,
glad to see some action, it has been so quiet in here.

I'm heeding your advice, lorraine!!! I decided to just do it on a canvas paper 16x20, since it's my first. i have the sketch done, so far and am monkeying around with paint samples. since i'm unfamiliar with impasto(have been following you all for the past 2 months, and have read only about glazing) so I think my goals in this will just be to get a decent skin colour, try to match up the colours to Cassats as much as possible, and to get a decent forming of the facial features as possible.( is that referred to as modeling?) Even if it's not exactly like hers, I'll shoot for it not looking distorted at all..
The only other challenge I am having right now, mixing the ratios of medium and paint. do you use an eye dropper or how is that measured. ( if this is not the appropriate place to be asking these questions, please let me know.)]
thankyou!!
Richard, your sketch is looking good!! and I am looking forward to following both of your progress.
gina

WV.Artistry
12-06-2004, 07:45 PM
Hi, Guys,
Richard, your sketch is looking good!! and I am looking forward to following both of your progress.
gina

Hello Gina

Practical advice : don't put the medium in your paint unless you want to make a glaze -- and this painting doesn't need a glaze. Except at the end, and that doesn't need a medium. Some paints are designed to be glazing paints -- right out of the tube, i.e., Raw Sienna.

My approach with this is to paint the girl pink first. Over that, I'll glaze (without medium) raw sienna, etc. for shadowing. And it might come close to whatever the artist did. Study the forehead, you can see the pink behind the dirt.

Here's Jar #1 Turpentine or substitute
(clean your brushes as you go, wipe off excess turpentine at lip).

Here's Jar #2 Medium
(dip your brush, wipe off excess medium at lip).

If you don't know why you're using a medium, then don't use one ;) It sounds like you're making problems for yourself. Keep it simple.

Can you post a picture of your progress?

g7i7n7a
12-06-2004, 08:47 PM
OH, thankyou somuch, Richard
I just have a small scanner, so I am looking to borrow a camera, pretty quick here and will post my start, hopefully tomorrow.
grateful, (not dead)
gina :wave:

WV.Artistry
12-06-2004, 09:45 PM
Richard:
Newfoundland

Nicole

Nicole

I drove out of St. John, found a road, kept driving, and it went to the end of the world -- almost fell off the edge. Prior to that, I thought the ends of the earth was just a phrase for story books :)

Join in if you can.

Richard

rwhiteley
12-07-2004, 08:37 AM
well, here's my start. its on a 16x20 canvas, which is very close to the original proportions. One thing that hits you when you draw it is that the hat really is too big. What was Mary thinking?,or is the little girl trying on Mummy's hat? Any way , I might reduce it a little when I get around to paint, or should I keep it as is?
Richard

rwhiteley
12-07-2004, 08:44 AM
my image did not come up trying again

WV.Artistry
12-07-2004, 01:37 PM
w/i/p oil sketch

session 3hr
to-date 4hr

burnt umber
flake white

medium : turpentine

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2004/53202-WIP_MOM_Oil_Sketch.jpg

Squib
12-07-2004, 02:11 PM
Richard - you like the purple ? You can have it (it is disappearing slowly - burnt umber & white). You are right about the chicken scratches. A good start - you have already captured the likeness.

Gina - good advice from Richard on the mediums etc.

Richard W - nice to see you here. I am also concerned about the size of the hat, but am going to leave it as is.

In studying the reference, I find her forearms unusually thick, and her left hand is rather large too. There is no slenderness at the wrist. Am I imagining this :confused: Maybe she was just a podgy little girl.

My update - an hour this evening. I have to stop now - duty calls :mad: I have worked on the background, and started on her face - with great difficulty. I am sorry I didn't do as you suggested Richard -started off pink and then dirtied it. I will keep at it. If I get a chance later tonight I want to do some work on her dress. I don't think this one is going to take too long.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Dec-2004/35948-strawhat2.JPG

WV.Artistry
12-07-2004, 02:22 PM
Any way , I might reduce it a little when I get around to paint, or should I keep it as is?


Two Richard's in the same thread. Hmmn.. If we add one more, he's the Dick, agreed?

I edited my hat from both within and from the outside until it formed something I could look at and not be annoyed. I don't think it a perfect elipse anyway. That's why it works in the original -- illusion.

Do you want a suggestion? At some point in every session, you have realize the extent of your copying skills. Then, let it become yours. The end result is a more presentable rendition. And sometimes, this approach actually pushes the work closer to the spirit of painting that the original artist tapped into. More oomph!.

Richard

p.s. it's a minor thing, but since you don't have the highlights in place, I think it's skewing your view of the dimensions.

Yokovich
12-07-2004, 02:23 PM
I'll have a go at this month's selection but I am thinking about adding a prozac milkshake

Squib
12-07-2004, 03:13 PM
Two Richard's in the same thread. Hmmn.. If we add one more, he's the Dick, agreed?



ROFL :D :D

WV.Artistry
12-07-2004, 03:48 PM
I'll have a go at this month's selection but I am thinking about adding a prozac milkshake

Okay Pandora, I'm gonna say this and it will be out of the way.

I'm working on the painting this morning, and the girl in the straw hat says to me :

"Pleeez Suh . . . I hafs to pee!"

Yokovich
12-07-2004, 06:40 PM
Okay Pandora, I'm gonna say this and it will be out of the way.

I'm working on the painting this morning, and the girl in the straw hat says to me :

"Pleeez Suh . . . I hafs to pee!" LOL LOL LOL!!!! Richard, do you think she may have already spoilt her garment? lol

artcrazy
12-07-2004, 08:13 PM
hee hee hee...........I was thinking she doesn't look too happy.......... :D

WV.Artistry
12-07-2004, 10:46 PM
Maybe she was just a podgy little girl.



Kids are tough. I've learned in other failed attempts that kids and teens fall under the category of "less is more". The less detail, the more they look like kids and teens. Seen quite a few other people go through the same thing. So, I'm really hoping to cross a threshold with this painting and not accidently morph her into a Leprechan.

I mostly used a #4 filbert bristle and a 1" goat-hair brush for the oil sketch.

Nice capture on the underside of the hat.

avigayil
12-08-2004, 02:13 PM
hee hee hee...........I was thinking she doesn't look too happy.......... :D


I have pure and genuine compassion with this girl.
The picture of the lady who painted the her, didn't made me feel rolling with laughter either :(

regards,
Avigayil

WV.Artistry
12-08-2004, 02:49 PM
I have pure and genuine compassion with this girl.
The picture of the lady who painted the her, didn't made me feel rolling with laughter either :(

regards,
Avigayil

Agreed. It's is a very emotive painting. But sometimes, there's a fine line between the sound of laughter and weeping. And I can't always tell the difference when listening from across the room.

I can only speak for myself, but please overlook the banter if it was unintentionally offensive. We are studying this painting and that should speak for itself -- we are paying the artist and composition the highest form of compliment.

Having been sucked into the depression of a particular artwork before, and been unproductive in that state, I would not find the good spirits offensive because of that experience.

And that's all I have to say about that.

Squib
12-08-2004, 02:57 PM
Yes, Avigayil - she does evoke a feeling of compassion.

Richard, I am inclined to think that she was one of Mary's neices, and I am sure she is the same child painted in The Sisters (the one on the left). I am also sure I have seen her in another Cassatt painting (which I am searching for at the moment). I'll post it if I find it.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Dec-2004/35948-the_sisters_1885.JPG
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Dec-2004/35948-30792-girlsm.jpg

WV.Artistry
12-08-2004, 03:46 PM
. . .one of Mary's neices, and I am sure she is the same child painted in The Sisters (the one on the left). I am also sure I have seen her in another Cassatt painting (which I am searching for at the moment). I'll post it if I find it.



Thanks Lorraine,

I really like the brushstrokes of this artist -- she brought out something in me that I didn't know was there. Her compositions really do follow a basic rule . . . the figure is the focus.

Unfortunately, I need to wrap mine up soon and get to work on a piece for an exhibit next week. Maybe some others will join in, now that you(s) have the ball rolling.

While you're surfing for that other picture, if you find any tidbits on her techniques or thoughts about painting -- it would be appreciated and an interesting read.

Richard

rwhiteley
12-08-2004, 04:50 PM
Well heres the "other Richard" with an update. My what a lot of chat about this painting!, It seems to evoke lots of emotion . Spent about 2 more hours on this thing. Wish I had some formal portrait training, I am having a terrible time with the face. Its all in the eyes and mouth, but even a tiny tweak seems to change the whole expression.
Well here's where I am at. Any suggestions more than welcome.
Richard

dcorc
12-08-2004, 06:03 PM
I adopt exactly the same downcast expression when my friends make me wear the silly hat out of the cracker, at the end of Chrismas lunch. :(

Very good observation, Raine - it certainly looks like the same little girl. The other painting there is very informative about her painting technique, actually - note the way she's got a few placement lines in (mainly) (?)ochre paint, on top of which she's then putting the dress fabric.

Richard (GQ) - lots of good comments and advice here from you!

Richard (W) - that's the problem with faces, very small alterations do change the expression - half the trick's knowing when to stop pushing it around, - often, being satisfied with just getting it a bit closer and stopping to let the paint dry, before proceeding with another round of adjustments - not a purist's approach, but a good way of getting the practice in, I think - getting it right first off only comes with considerable experience.

I'm still catching up a bit, want to finish Nov's first (hoping to do that, and start this, by next weekend)

Dave

g7i7n7a
12-08-2004, 07:18 PM
Hi other Richard,
This is looking really great. :clap:
It is amazing how a the slightest little tweak makes a world of difference.the only suggestion I have might be to tweak the cheek a little to balance her face abit. (if that's even possible at this stage, I have no idea) but this may be completely wrong, so maybe someone else could pipe in.
I guess I'll be learning about this as well.

Definitely looks like the same girl. To me, lots of children in old works look as though they completely sick of posing for the artist and just want to get outside and play, dammit!! I'm getting a little fond of her, now that I have drawn her so many times!!! hopefully, I'll start painting soon. :)
gina

WV.Artistry
12-09-2004, 11:56 AM
w/i/p foundation

session 4hr
to-date 8hr

raw umber green shade
payne's grey
burnt umber
raw olive umber
burnt sienna
transparent red ochre
torrit grey (free from Gamblin)
flake white

medium : turpentine

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Dec-2004/53202-WIP_MOM_Foundation.jpg

Michael-Ann
12-09-2004, 12:39 PM
Great progress is being made :) I love these threads as it helps so much in learning how to really "see" the details of these paintings and what goes into actually making those details happen on the canvas.

I found this image showing some detail of the strokes in her face and hair, there are two other detail shots of the "Child in Straw Hat" on the same site, if'n anyone is interested.

http://www.nga.gov/cgi-bin/pimage?61101+0+2+ggcassattGtg

Access to other detail shots here (http://www.nga.gov/cgi-bin/pdimage?61101+0+ggcassattGtg)

Squib
12-09-2004, 01:06 PM
Great progress Richard - you have her pose just right !

Thanks Michael-Ann. :) The images you gave us are much lighter than the one I have saved to my PC (and which I printed and am painting from). These are probably truer to the original - so I will lighten everything as I go. I had planned to post another update but camera batteries just died, :mad: so they are on charge at the mo. Update to follow in an hour or two.

WV.Artistry
12-09-2004, 01:26 PM
Thanks Michael-Ann. :)

I'll second that . . . I see now that I'm doing this entirely wrong.

The "white" canvas showing makes me think this painting might've been done in one sitting. I didn't see those threads in my printout.

I can also see now what appear to be pencil marks. I hope I'm wrong. But it's a problem many artists with excellent drawing skills often have -- not enough meat on the canvas. Not a dis' but it would make one of my first assumptions correct, that she was drawing with paint.

rwhiteley
12-09-2004, 08:31 PM
Well, Ive played with the face , probably too much and I am leaving it for now, and will look at it again next week.Its a lot of fun, such a cute little face.
Richard[other]

Now I look at the images they appear to shift to red when they are uploaded, or is it my monitor?

g7i7n7a
12-09-2004, 09:59 PM
Richard,
HI, It looks great! just a tiny bit of tweaking goes along way. :clap:
I noticed you did some adjusting under the eye, as well. Looks awesome.!
You've done a great job with skin tones, too. I hope I can do as well.
(Hope I have not caused you any grief.) glad your having fun :)
maybe i can post something this weekend. I am working on two of them :(
bye for now
gina

WV.Artistry
12-09-2004, 10:10 PM
Richard[other]



Richard[other]

That's a nice purply-blue. What is it?

Richard[the]

:)

Squib
12-10-2004, 03:05 AM
Couldn't upload my pics last night - it took ages for my batteries to charge :mad: . So - here I am 8am, so much to do today - I will be off this computer and in that kitchen any minute now.

Richard W - she looks good. I am becoming very fond of her.

This was my first update -

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Dec-2004/35948-sh3.JPG

Then I worked on her face a bit more. I'm going to let her dry before I go any further.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Dec-2004/35948-sh4.JPG

I think I need to lighten her up more. Back later.

rwhiteley
12-10-2004, 08:30 AM
Michael-Ann, re the web site with the detail brush strokes, thanks for posting that. It is helpful in understanding how she did the face. It now looks to me as if the whole face was painted in the same base tones, and then the left side [as we look at it] was sort of scumbled over with various pink tones to create the highlights. This is just the opposite of what I tried to do, start with the pink and then modify.
Richard W

Richard: the purply blue is dioxazine purple sort of glazed over the umber underpainting. btw I am painting in acrylic so may not be quite the same tone on oil.

Michael-Ann
12-10-2004, 10:19 AM
The more at I look at the close up of that face, her strokes, the color, and in all my glorious ignorance, I think..."I could do THAT" Well, maybe :D But I should really catch-up on the house-hold chores this weekend...riiiiiiiggggghhhhhht like that is ever gonna happen.;)

Squib
12-10-2004, 10:47 AM
I've managed to work on her face some more. I am trying to go more pink, and also scumbling to lighten her flesh. I really wish I had used the same mental approach to my Boogie - just slapping it on, no stress.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Dec-2004/35948-s-hat.JPG

SallyAnn
12-10-2004, 11:46 AM
I must admit I cheated and started this last month. I ended up not liking it so played around with it, made her hair longer, changed the dress colour etc. Although I love her work I don't think Im ready to sit patiently and try and copy her style perfectly. Anyway, this one is hanging on my wall to fill up some bare space! Cant wait to see everyones work on this.

irish artist
12-10-2004, 01:00 PM
Hi Folks, the last time I joined you was for the Frans Hals and am returning now to paint the Mary Cassat-better late than never-will post after the coming weekend.

Reading the posts about the painting have helped give me an idea of what to expect-everyone is doing stunning work. :clap: :clap:

WV.Artistry
12-10-2004, 04:36 PM
I need to do a few edits but this is about finished. It's raining here today, sorry about the photo quality.

w/i/p overpainting

session 3hr (includes cup of coffee)
to-date 11hr

medium : venetian turpentine

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Dec-2004/53202-WIP_MOM_Overpaintng.jpg

sbeckett
12-10-2004, 11:55 PM
This is sure getting more action than the Sargeant!
Thought this would be a 2-session quickie. And it was if you don't count the night trying to fix the first days screw-ups. Guess practice would sharpen my drawing- but drawing gets to be like doing math in my head. Not the fun part, nor is trying to spot whats wrong. Looking in a mirror, using a brush as a gauge, and flipping between computer images- it was all a struggle.
What I was left with didn't quite get the gesture of the head -her whole body is her expression- that's the mastery of the Cassat. Her face is just entering into "overworked" and muddiness. Had some nice brushwork going but kept on in the interest of the copy. Not displeased, just burnt out by the needless fussing.

16X20 cotton board
Steve
(just saw Michael-Ann's detail post -wish i'd seen it first :( )

guillot
12-11-2004, 10:51 AM
Oh Wow!! Sorry for not being around - been very sick this past week -on the verge of pneumonia and I'm just not regaining much energy yet at this point - but I wanted to say this is all such beautiful work !!!!

Steve :clap: I think she looks wonderful. You are right - it's all about the expression with Cassatt, and you've captured that expression well !!

Tina

sbeckett
12-11-2004, 11:00 PM
thanks Tina & Richard
as to palette- brnt sienna/ yel ochre/ naples yellow hue (not vital but using it up)/a napthol red and cad yellow I mixed for an orange/ quin. red/ ultra. blue / some thio violet in the dress (also to use up)/ tit. white/ a black mix of sienna and blue. The background was just palette mud mostly. Hate to throw stuff away.(I stick the palette in the freezer - tried it with a small painting once -lets say "alla freeza" was not a sucess). A mix of brands -Grumb.- Gamblin- M Graham

Steve

irish artist
12-12-2004, 07:01 PM
First Rough-in sized 18x20 Oil on Canvas. May let this set up a bit before doing more work on it.

Squib
12-13-2004, 03:36 PM
Richard - good finish ! As Steve says, her whole body is her expression, and you have captured that expression.

Sally-Ann - this one is looking really cute - an original !

Tina :eek: oh dear - hope you are feeling better. Pneumonia ia awful. About 4 weeks ago I had my daughter in bed with pneumonia, hubby on the couch - very ill, and my Mother had bronchitis. I was ready to up and run !

Steve - she is lovely. This shows great confidence.

Irish - great start.

I have finished - I think - but cannot get a photo worth uploading tonight. I will try to get one in the light of day and post it tomorrow. :)

rwhiteley
12-13-2004, 03:38 PM
Thanks Lorraine. Heres my last [I think] update. Working on the face and trying to get that expression, but still not there, its more wistfull and slightly accusing. I bet Mary didn't fiddle about with little brushes like I've been doing :( .
Richard,other

irish artist
12-13-2004, 06:18 PM
Rich, I think your face is almost done, and no, I don't think Mary fiddled around either, I'm trying to think as she would have while painting in her style.
Mostly I think she liked the impressionists and they put the painting down in one try and tried to grab the essence.

dcorc
12-15-2004, 04:07 PM
Richards I and II - both good goes - keeping this one "fresh" I think is part of the thing

Irish - very good to have you back with us!

Steve - excellent (as we've come to expect from you) - a close copy.

Sally-Ann - good to see your version here too

Raine - looking forward to seeing your final on this

Tina - glad you're feeling better - up to having a go?

Here's the start on mine 16x20 acrylic gessoed hardboard. using the alkyds for this one. Coated with a thin layer of white. Loose sketch in ochre, corrected with a solvent-wetted brush.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2004/30792-dccassatt1.jpg

Dave

irish artist
12-15-2004, 06:34 PM
Hey, Dave, Good to see you too! Looks like you are joining us late also. My second try at the Rough-in:

dcorc
12-18-2004, 08:16 PM
Looks good, Irish!

Here's what I did on Friday evening:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Dec-2004/30792-dccassatt2.jpg

I'm just about to have another session at it now (yes, I know it's after 1am here! :) )

Dave

dcorc
12-19-2004, 12:31 PM
And, after about another 2 hours of painting I ended up with this:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Dec-2004/30792-dccassatt3.jpg

which I think is probably finished.

Dave

WV.Artistry
12-19-2004, 12:58 PM
which I think is probably finished.

Dave

Good flesh tones in the face -- very English. What did you use?

dcorc
12-19-2004, 04:22 PM
Good flesh tones in the face -- very English. What did you use?

Thanks Richard - it's done alla prima - the flesh palette was titanium white, yellow ochre, permanent alizarin crimson, vermilion hue (toluidine red) and burnt umber - I also used cadmium yellow medium, cobalt blue, and ivory black elsewhere - all W&N Alkyds.

Dave

WV.Artistry
12-19-2004, 07:10 PM
Thanks Richard - it's done alla prima - the flesh palette was titanium white, yellow ochre, permanent alizarin crimson, vermilion hue (toluidine red) and burnt umber - I also used cadmium yellow medium, cobalt blue, and ivory black elsewhere - all W&N Alkyds.

Dave

Interesting. CI Pigment Red 3 (Toluidine Red) has more synonyms than the devil.

irish artist
12-20-2004, 05:37 AM
Good painting, Dave, done in two days you say? What an advantage over oils and it has the "Impressionist" look. Is it your easiest portrait to copy of all the ones you have done on this thread?

WV.Artistry
12-20-2004, 08:43 AM
a few links . . .

http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/cassatt/
http://sunsite.dk/cgfa/cassatt/
http://www.artcyclopedia.com/artists/cassatt_mary.html
http://www.nga.gov/collection/gallery/cassatt/cassatt-main1.html
http://www.artchive.com/artchive/C/cassatt.html
http://www.abcgallery.com/C/cassatt/cassatt.html
http://www.mcs.csuhayward.edu/~malek/Cassat.html
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Museum/Artists/c/Mary_Cassatt/
http://www.ocaiw.com/cassatt.htm
http://www.absolutearts.com/masters/names/Cassatt_Mary_Stevenson.html
http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/ij/impressionism.Cassatt.html
http://www.angelfire.com/art/favoritewomenartists/mary_cassatt.htm
http://www.fine-art.com/Lyceum/OldMasters/Cassatt/

Squib
12-23-2004, 08:51 AM
And, after about another 2 hours of painting I ended up with this:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Dec-2004/30792-dccassatt3.jpg

which I think is probably finished.

Dave

Wonderful Dave, and yes, I think she is finished. :clap: :clap: :clap: (Good heavens - don't you ever sleep ?) :D

WV.Artistry
12-23-2004, 01:30 PM
Dave,

I've rarely used Vermillion . . it's too orange, and Chinese Vermillion too red. Where exactly did you use it? Thanks.

dcorc
12-23-2004, 07:10 PM
IrishArtist/Diann - 3 sessions, probably about 6 hours in all - definitely my quickest of the year, by a substantial margin. - All one coat, apart from the background where I scrubbed on a lighter warm grey in the third session. Really trying to keep the loose approach with it. Weak in places (eg that hand :o - sausages! :rolleyes: ), but I didn't want to rework it and lose the broad feel in order to get something a little more tightly drawn.

Lorraine - thanks - I've always liked working in the small hours - I like the peace and quiet of it.

Richard - the vermilion hue is just here and there in small amounts in the pinker/redder skin areas, along with the perm. alizarin crimson - in some areas crimson predominates in pushing things towards a more magentaish-pink. I think the vermilion hue shows up most in the redder skin of the hand and along the lower border of the forearm, and on the outer sides of the cheeks - but its all just a hint. It's a slightly orangey red. I haven't seen a real vermilion yet that appeals, in the UK - I like Michael Harding's paints a lot, but his real vermilion is not as bright and vibrant as I'm lead to believe are available elsewhere.

Dave

guillot
12-26-2004, 01:30 PM
Have about 40 minutes on this. Just trying to get the paint down - then I can play around with it a little better cause I have quite a bit to do yet:

Tina

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Dec-2004/5957-Cassat_A1_beginning.jpg

guillot
12-26-2004, 03:02 PM
About 30 minutes more work. Trying to get the face as close as possible before I move on - still have the mouth to do, nose to fix etc. but the face is emerging. Arms look quite dead at this point - will do those last - really want to finish up her face, hair and stuff first. Ultramarine too blue up in the ribbon on her hat - thinking of going back over with prussian instead.

I'm having fun moving quick :) What an exericise in looseness !! Mine will probably end up the saddest little girl you ever saw (technique wise ;) ) LOL

Tina

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Dec-2004/5957-Cassat_b1a.jpg

dcorc
12-26-2004, 03:12 PM
Hi Tina ! :wave:

it's coming together well - painting this one quickly, is of the essence of it :)

Dave

guillot
12-26-2004, 04:00 PM
:wave: Hi Dave :) Thanks for the comments !!

EGADS!!! Well - this is what I have so far - some adjustments and then I think I'm done.

Tina

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Dec-2004/5957-Cassat_c1.jpg

guillot
12-26-2004, 04:37 PM
Done -

What a warm up :)

She's not perfect - but it's close enough.....

Thanks,
Tina

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Dec-2004/5957-Cassat_d2.jpg

dcorc
12-26-2004, 05:27 PM
:clap: :clap: :clap:

Well done, Tina - all done as a single session - (which I'd guess is how the original was) - so what was the total time spent? (There was an impressionist exhibition here a couple of years ago called "Painting quickly in northern France"! :)

Dave

guillot
12-26-2004, 06:49 PM
Hi Dave - Thanks! No more than 2 1/2 - 3 hours of total painting time all together. I wish I could've sat down for 3 hours straight without interruptions - that would've been nice ! (Impossible in my home with a 14 and 10 year old). I know her hat's a bit off - and her arms are a bit "fat", cheeks should've been much redder - but not too bad for winging it - I'm proud of it considering the time spent on it. And, most importantly - I had a blast with this one. It was quite a freeing experience :) Thanks again.

Did you go to this exhibition Dave?

Tina

dcorc
12-26-2004, 07:07 PM
Excellent, Tina - I think it's important to get the spirit of this painting - it's one of the difficulties of these loose brushy paintings that duplicating them closely is virtually impossible, without painting in a much more deliberate technique than was originally used - I once came across a nice quote (which I paraphrase here badly), pointing out that the difficulty of trying to "walk in the footsteps of giants" was that the original giants were not selfconsciously concerned about where they stepped, but merely went on their way, whereas we who would follow precisely must perforce concentrate both on where we're going and on where we are putting our feet :p

Alas, I didn't get to that exhibition - one of many :o - I can feel a new years resolution coming on, to take more advantage of my proximity to world-class galleries.

Dave

irish artist
12-27-2004, 05:10 PM
I'm calling this "DONE" and I had fun--Thanks to all who commented :)

WV.Artistry
12-27-2004, 07:09 PM
It's interesting watching the progress of these paintings . . like a story whispered in someone's ear, they whisper it to the next, and the painting from each artist represents their version of the story as they heard it and try to repeat it.

The expressions these paintings have are priceless.

Salute.

:)

artbars
12-29-2004, 03:46 PM
By the way - I here was...... :wave: It was very interesting to see many different works and course of work.
Good discussion. Great work everyone!!! :clap: :clap: :clap: I wish good luck!

Yokovich
12-30-2004, 12:05 AM
In typical celestia fashion I am here at the very end of the month with my effort. This is 16 x 20 and I worked on it for about three hours. She is not right--I missed the colors, I missed the value under her saucer hat--I tried to make her eyes seem downcast but she seemed to always be looking straight ahead--I don't know if I will do more on it--maybe tomorrow when I have another chance to evaluate her in daylight. I will back back to comment on everyone's results too! thanks for checking mine out. God, she is so forlorn. poor wee tyke...off to the orphanage perhaps and having to wear that hat no less.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Dec-2004/33531-MOMdec.jpg

Yokovich
12-31-2004, 12:52 AM
OK! I decided to have another crack at 'er! Glad I did because I know I improved her. I corrected the value under the brim and I generally fixed her here and there. I completely corrected color (I couldn't seem to achieve the "golden-ness" of the original at all--but I definately warmed it up). I am feeling better about her tonight than I did yesterday! (& I still want to reach back through time and give her a chuck under her chin--I grew "fond" of her too) --Here is my final --I am really glad I did this one even though I had my doubts about it--in the end I am pleased and I learned alot!--thanks dcorc for chosing this...! :)
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2004/33531-MOM1.jpg

irish artist
12-31-2004, 08:08 AM
Great "Do-Over" Celestia!! That took courage and it paid off for you!!

guillot
12-31-2004, 02:03 PM
Great Job Celestia!!! She is quite a charming little girl. And yes - she was fun to paint, huh? Both or your paintings are wonderful - great effort.

Hello Irish Artist - I like your painting too. Like the realistic approach and results. Very nice !!!!!

Everyone's done such a fabulous job of catching her expression !!! :clap:

Tina

Biki
01-04-2005, 03:33 PM
It's interesting watching the progress of these paintings . . like a story whispered in someone's ear, they whisper it to the next, and the painting from each artist represents their version of the story as they heard it and try to repeat it.

The expressions these paintings have are priceless.

Salute.

:)

Rich, not only are you a fine painter, you are also a fine poet.
Well said.

I really do enjoy watching them all come together so beautifully.