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View Full Version : Transfer Drawing to Kitty Wallis--WIP


Masque
11-14-2004, 01:21 PM
Definitely need some help. This is 16.5x22.5 using Rembrandt pastels on Kitty Wallis. My first time using KW and I'm loving getting acquainted with this miracle paper. Have come up against a couple of unexpected problems though. Because of the heavy tooth of KW I made my initial graphite drawing on 110# drawing paper. Then put it on a window (image facing window) and traced my drawing with soft charcoal directly onto it's backside. Next I placed drawing (charcoal side down) on KW paper and taped corners. After testing pressure marks I traced my original pencil drawing (lightly I thought) with red felt tip pen. My problems? 1) The pastel keeps falling off the canvas on the drawn charcoal lines, leaving a black line showing through in spots. What have I done wrong? Hearing that KW was tough enough to be scrubbed I think I assumed too much. The only thing I can figure is that I scored my canvas by my transfer? 2) My composition is complicated and just working on seems to be causing pastel to fall off of already completed areas. I generally don't use any fix, but am wondering if that might be the answer to keeping the pastel on the canvas. I tried pushing pastel into the canvas with color shapers with inconsistent success. PLEASE HELP!! Sorry photo isn't better--doesn't really show what I'm talking about. Darn

:( :( :( :( :(

K Taylor-Green
11-14-2004, 02:55 PM
Wow! Complicated, indeed! I use a method similar to what you did to transfer my drawings. I use regular tracing paper, draw over the backside with charcoal pencil, tape paper to Wallis surface, and rub the lines with an old
typewriter eraser. I have never had any problems with this, on any surface I use.
Maybe someone else has a better way?

Masque
11-14-2004, 03:20 PM
Wow! Complicated, indeed! I use a method similar to what you did to transfer my drawings. I use regular tracing paper, draw over the backside with charcoal pencil, tape paper to Wallis surface, and rub the lines with an old
typewriter eraser. I have never had any problems with this, on any surface I use.
Maybe someone else has a better way?

Thanks, Kate, I wish I had thought of using typewriter eraser. What a good idea. I guess I blew this one. Oh well, learned something good. I'll definitely try that next time. Yes, way too complicated--it was one of those things that just kind of grew...and then grew some more. It started out as a portrait and turned into a stained glass window. Unfortunately looked a lot better in my head than in reality. Sigh!

How do I scrub this canvas clean so I can use it for another painting?

Kitty Wallis
11-14-2004, 03:31 PM
Hi Gloria, you can scrub off the pastel, but you can't scrub off all the color or any lines that may have been scored into it. If you do want to abandon it, try spraying it with a lot of water. See if the lines leave a mark. The charcoal won't totally come off, but you may find that there are no score marks. I don't know. The best test for score marks is: rub lightly over the lines with the side of a hard pastel and you will see score marks if they are there.

How do I scrub this canvas clean so I can use it for another painting?

Masque
11-14-2004, 04:30 PM
Hi Gloria, you can scrub off the pastel, but you can't scrub off all the color or any lines that may have been scored into it. If you do want to abandon it, try spraying it with a lot of water. See if the lines leave a mark. The charcoal won't totally come off, but you may find that there are no score marks. I don't know. The best test for score marks is: rub lightly over the lines with the side of a hard pastel and you will see score marks if they are there.

Thanks so much, Kitty, I am considering abandoning it, but think I will put it away for a time and see if, by some miracle, fresh eyes help. Because I had good feelings about my B&W sketch, I took your paper to a local gallery and had it mounted (mount cost $12.50) on a thin board at a suggestion said to stablize the canvas during the painting process. I have a sneaky feeling that mount will complicate the scrubbing (spraying with lots of water) process. Am I right? I hope not. It would be nice if I could salvage my original investment of the canvas and board mount. :(

Kitty Wallis
11-14-2004, 04:47 PM
All you can do is try. I don't know what they used and if I did chances are I haven't tested it myself. Keep the paper/board, vertical as you wash it, don't let puddles soak in. Dry it vertical, taped or stapled to a firm board so it doesn't dry curved. Don't put it under a board and weights.

(In the 'Alternative to Dry mounting' thread, Madame Manga has had success with weights and a board, mounting an edge glued paper. I've never done that.)

I took your paper to a local gallery and had it mounted (mount cost $12.50) on a thin board at a suggestion said to stablize the canvas during the painting process. I have a sneaky feeling that mount will complicate the scrubbing (spraying with lots of water) process. Am I right? I hope not. It would be nice if I could salvage my original investment of the canvas and board mount. :(

Deborah Secor
11-14-2004, 06:19 PM
I'm having trouble believing that a felt tip pen would score this paper, but anything is possible. Before you wet it, Gloria (which I hope you haven't already...) I suggest you try using a foam house painting brush, the kind used for window trim, to rub out the image. Use the flat side and rub like crazy. I find that whatever is first laid down on Wallis tends to remain after you rub it out, as Kitty mentioned, but if you want to repaint the image anyway you could use the marks as a guide and just refresh the color. Just a thought, since you already invested so much...

Deborah

SweetBabyJ
11-14-2004, 06:25 PM
Yep- that's what I would do, too. I have a "foot brush"- like a miniature scrubbing brush- from a bath collection given to me years ago that I use for large areas- it's soft but stiff, if that makes sense. The old colours will meld and blend, and the paper will have a nice dark tone in various grayed hues all over it- making it perfect for another try.

I'm wondering if you scored the paper, so much as perhaps used charcoal pencils instead of vine charcoal? I've noticed the pencils don't liek to brush away as easily, whereas the vine pretty much disappears. The other thing I'd question is how many layers you've used to try and cover? If, after three, an area doesn't cover as I wish, I figure it's had enough chances, and I brush it right off.

Neat idea- look forward to seeing this when finished.

Masque
11-15-2004, 11:29 AM
Yep- that's what I would do, too. I have a "foot brush"- like a miniature scrubbing brush- from a bath collection given to me years ago that I use for large areas-it's soft but stiff The old colours will meld and blend, and the paper will have a nice dark tone in various grayed hues all over it- making it perfect for another try.

Thank you everyone.

No, I actually did use soft vine charcoal for this transfer. "Foot brush" huh? Really interesting idea. I can picture the results. Definitely a way to go before water bath. I'll keep trying.

Unfortunately I lost count of number of times I tried to cover, but too many I'm sure. Do you use a smaller version of foot brush for small areas on KW? Would a child's toothbrush be soft enough to work? Or, do those foam brushes Dee mentions come small, say, 1" size? On Canson I've always used kneaded eraser to lift and then erase, but that doesn't work well on KW. I must say though that no matter what I'm up against, I sure do love the paper. Amazing stuff.

SweetBabyJ
11-15-2004, 11:48 AM
An old toothbrush will work. Hell, I've gone so far as to use an old broom WHILE hosing it off- but I must add the third time I did that I managed to take some of the coating off in spots. But I look at it this way: That paper stood up to me through THAT MUCH aggressive effort- I was really ticked off that what I was doing wasn't working out- which is why I call it a victim paper.

Just scrub or hose it off, or both- but maybe without the kill-Kill-KILL factor I applied- and start again.

Masque
11-15-2004, 01:59 PM
[QUOTE= Hell, I've gone so far as to use an old broom WHILE hosing it off- but I must add the third time I did that I managed to take some of the coating off in spots. But I look at it this way: That paper stood up to me through THAT MUCH aggressive effort- I was really ticked off that what I was doing wasn't working out- which is why I call it a victim paper.

Just scrub or hose it off, or both- but maybe without the kill-Kill-KILL factor I applied- and start again.[/QUOTE]



LOL, and thanks SB, you've given me a good laugh and a real lift. I'll try to keep the KKK factor in check. All in all it has been a good experience, I've learned a lot, and your right--it's time to start again. :D