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MsLilypond
10-25-2004, 05:05 PM
Hi all,

I've decided for Christmas that I'm going to get my 12 year old cousin, Shaun,started in acrylic painting (that's the age I started). He is a very good artist for his age and art is about the only thing that's a confidence builder for him. He has pretty low self esteem . Now his parents are going to be getting a divorce and since he's a pretty sensitive kid I thought painting would be a good outlet for him and his emotions.

But I need some opinions, should I start him out on student grade paints such as liquitex basics or just craft acrylics (Keeping in mind that because of the divorce there is not going to be a lot of income for his mom to spend on paints when he runs out and I'm not sure how supportive his dad's going to be with Shaun's painting)

Secondly, should I get start him with a split primary palette (with a few extras like burnt sienna, raw sienna, and a huge tube of white) and get a book that teaches him how to mix his own colors (which might keep the costs down as well)? Or do you think that might be too overwhelming?


Brushes I have figured out.
Thanks for any help!

Mybubblewall
10-25-2004, 05:43 PM
But I need some opinions, should I start him out on student grade paints such as liquitex basics or just craft acrylics (Keeping in mind that because of the divorce there is not going to be a lot of income for his mom to spend on paints when he runs out and I'm not sure how supportive his dad's going to be with Shaun's painting)

Secondly, should I get start him with a split primary palette (with a few extras like burnt sienna, raw sienna, and a huge tube of white) and get a book that teaches him how to mix his own colors (which might keep the costs down as well)? Or do you think that might be too overwhelming?
My personal opinion is to start him with craft acrylics, something inexpensive. Also, I would use a basic palette with him, one yellow, one red, one blue, one white, one black (or a dark of choice). Keep it basic starting out then if he begins to feel comfortable with the mixing techniques, you can start going more indepth about warm and cool tones of any one color. That would be a good time to introduce a warm yellow and cool yellow, warm red, cool red, etc. Maybe as a treat you can bring in some artist quality paints (or student) to try out. Really depends on the budget, but I would start simple and basic and move up step by step to more complex.

Right on for doing this with him by the way! Will prove to be a good emotional outlet for him.

Tridun
10-25-2004, 05:55 PM
I think this is a great idea!! Last year I got my own daughter (who is now 12) started in acryllics.
The one thing I found is that she really likes to have a wide variety of colours, even though she can mix her own colours as well. Having a wider variety actually reduces the amount of paint that she uses, although she's getting better.
The thing she likes best is working along side of me, so that she can ask questions, etc. Books don't always work with this age group.
What a good cousin you are!!! Every child needs to be good at something, and no matter what it is, it should always be encouraged.

Patricia

talkingbanana
10-25-2004, 05:58 PM
That's about how old I was when I started. I had played around with craft acrylics, but they never felt like "real" paint. It wasn't until I got my Liquitex Basics that I actually felt like I was painting for real. The craft acrylics are . . . well, gross. Heh . . ..

Might want to check out System 3 or Galleria - they tend to run even a bit cheaper than Liquitex Basics, at least around here, and they would be a good start.

Gaka
10-25-2004, 06:07 PM
Hi there MsLilypond

It is a wonderfull thing to get anyone started in art/painting especially young people. I agree with Mybubblewall, just budget the primary colors.....I dont know just how close you are distance wise to him, but it would be invaluable if you could have some input into his art by asking him to make specific colors with the three primary colors etc, blending, light/shade etc etc...

The majority of my art materials are students paints and I have been useing them since I started painting, Oils, watercolors and acrylics, I could never afford artist quality and now that I can afford some artist quality paints I dont want to be wastefull and throw out the students colors now.

But do you know the thing that I regret the most about my art and its beginning is?.....I realy regret very much the fact that I did not learn to draw or get any confidence in drawing when I was young. So if I could go back to my childhood again I would learn to draw until I became proficient at it as this would have given me sooooo much confidence in everything that I attempted after that! I can draw now, But not as good as I would like to or with the confidence that I would like.

Gaka

Artguy29
10-25-2004, 06:45 PM
I think the best way to go is to get him started with some Liquitex Basics. Craft acrylics are formulated in a far different manner than student grade paints, giving him the wrong idea of how to use acrylics. I think you should get a 6 color set of the Liquitex Basics, a very popular set for first time painters. You can get the set for about $17. It is well worth the money because they come in 4 oz. tubes; I still use the set today, after getting them a year ago. An extra tube of white is also included. The colors included are Ultramarine Blue, Pthalo Green, Cadmium Yellow Hue, Cadmium Red Hue, Titanium White, and Mars Black. All colors are AP Non-Toxic, but the hues undergo advanced formulation to replicate the pure color. These paints are sure to give him an excellent feel for acrylics; I know they did for me :) .
Hope this helps.

Dave

Enchanted
10-25-2004, 08:27 PM
I think the best way to go is to get him started with some Liquitex Basics. Dave
A wholehearted "second that" from me. Add a few 16 X 20 canvas boards to the "present" and a package of synthetic brushes, and let that budding artist loose to roam!

MsLilypond
10-26-2004, 09:40 AM
I think I'm going to go with student grade, right now Michaels has the Liquitex basics on sale for $2.79 a tube. If he goes through them too quickly I'm am thinking about getting him Blickrylics (from dick blick) for his birthday in April. They are described as student grade, and a mixing set with magenta, ultramarine, pthalo blue, chrome yellow, white, black is about $17.00 all are in pint size bottles, so he'd have them awhile. I'd also buy a bottle of burnt sienna, since I adore that color, and it's a great base for so many skin tones. I remember using them in high school and they seemed okay.

MsLilypond
10-26-2004, 09:42 AM
A wholehearted "second that" from me. Add a few 16 X 20 canvas boards to the "present" and a package of synthetic brushes, and let that budding artist loose to roam!


I just bought off ebay a table easel, with a canvas, and brush set for $15.00
and a package of 15 brushes for $9.00.

Johnnie
10-26-2004, 10:33 AM
Hi

You might want to consider getting some Masonite boards. Get a sheet or half sheet at Home Depot. Then get them to cut them them to what ever size you think she will like. I would not go too large.

Get your self a jar of Acrylic Gesso then coat the Masonite 2 or 3 times to give it some tooth.

Whats nice about the masonite is that is CHEAP and if she messes up on her paintings you can scrap it off with a putty knife or razor blade or even recoat it with Acyrlic Gesso for that matter..

Its a very thrifty way to acquire support panels for paintings. I use them with oil and would never go back to canvas. I use 1/4 masonite boards. Little heavy but they dont warp.

Johnnie

MsLilypond
10-26-2004, 11:29 AM
Hi

You might want to consider getting some Masonite boards. Get a sheet or half sheet at Home Depot. Then get them to cut them them to what ever size you think she will like. I would not go too large.

Get your self a jar of Acrylic Gesso then coat the Masonite 2 or 3 times to give it some tooth.

Whats nice about the masonite is that is CHEAP and if she messes up on her paintings you can scrap it off with a putty knife or razor blade or even recoat it with Acyrlic Gesso for that matter..

Its a very thrifty way to acquire support panels for paintings. I use them with oil and would never go back to canvas. I use 1/4 masonite boards. Little heavy but they dont warp.

Johnnie


I use masonite boards myself, I was thinking about that, I'd have to get Shaun his own jar of gesso and putty knife,though. He lives about 2 1/2 hours away from me, so if he messes up a painting it's a bit far for me to drive to help him fix it, but I can talk him through it on the phone.

Enchanted
10-26-2004, 08:23 PM
I use masonite boards myself.
I think that people need to quit using that reference for hardboards, since Masonite has not made hardboards for some time now. How to get people to change is the question - perhaps an insurmountable one! :rolleyes:

Johnnie
10-26-2004, 11:49 PM
I think that people need to quit using that reference for hardboards, since Masonite has not made hardboards for some time now. How to get people to change is the question - perhaps an insurmountable one! :rolleyes:

Well we all [pretty much all] know the name has changed we just cant seem to remember the new one..
How about the brown stuff that smooth on the front and rough on the back, or is it the other way around is that better.

Thanks for partially enlightening us about hardboard.. Now how about finishing it and telling us the new name, Again.

But you know if you go into Home Depot and ask for Masonite they know what one is asking for. So we cant all be wrong now can we.

Johnnie

Enchanted
10-27-2004, 10:45 AM
Thanks for partially enlightening us about hardboard.. Now how about finishing it and telling us the new name, Again.

But you know if you go into Home Depot and ask for Masonite they know what one is asking for. So we cant all be wrong now can we.

Johnnie

I'm posting this to the "masonite questions" thread too, so here is what I wrote in reply to another's comments along the same lines:

I think it's a case of the word "masonite" having become the popular designation instead of the word "hardboard." Masonite Corp. developed their particular proprietary process for manufacturing the hardboards once made by them. Hardboards available today may or may not be made using the same process that Masonite originally developed. But I hasten to add, I'm certainly no authority on this subject. And if people wish to refer to hardboards from other companies as "masonite" there is little chance of changing that popular usage at this late date (especially since the clerks in Home Depot know the difference between "masonite" and MDF, particle board, chip board, etc.) :rolleyes:

MsLilypond
10-27-2004, 10:45 AM
I think that people need to quit using that reference for hardboards, since Masonite has not made hardboards for some time now. How to get people to change is the question - perhaps an insurmountable one! :rolleyes:


Oh get over it, hardboard is probably always going to be called masonite,
just like most cotton swabs are referred to as q-tips and most facial tissues are called kleenex.

Now do you have any advice for me about my cousin? which is what this thread is about, not about masonite/hardboard.

Einion
10-28-2004, 01:44 AM
Hi Michelle, I think a split-primary palette is probably the easiest base to work from as a beginner so I would second that choice myself. A few earths are certainly useful too, especially when starting out; a large tube of white is a great idea, we all tend to use that more than everything else! Basics aren't the greatest paint from what I've heard but if that's what he'll likely be able to afford in future I don't see any reason not to start him out with them. Galeria and Daler-Rowney's System 3 are other options if they'd be available locally and they're a little better I believe.

If you're thinking of getting him a book about colour mixing I think Blue And Yellow Don't Make Green is a good start and there's a hardback copy available on Abebooks.com for $16.50 at the moment. A split-primary palette will tie into this book most effectively as well. If you'd prefer a book that covers more general painting advice I'm not sure what to recommend, hopefully some other people will chime in with suggestions.

Einion