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deLYNNEation
10-24-2004, 05:19 PM
Robert Genn hosts a website, "The Painter's Keys" with thoughtful and informative posts - you can subscribe & receive a bi-weekly letter which is posted later on the website with responses from readers along with some excellent work. His website is for all artists, tho he paints in acrylic.

His bi-weekly letter received on Friday is about Golden mediums, with some techniques I haven't considered (or even heard of!).

You can view the letter & the rest here:

http://www.painterskeys.com/letters.asp?let=041021 [url]

Thought it would be of interest to the acrylic painters if you haven't seen his website before.

Enchanted
10-24-2004, 07:34 PM
You can view the letter & the rest here:

http://www.painterskeys.com/letters.asp?let=041021 [url]

Thought it would be of interest to the acrylic painters if you haven't seen his website before.
Thank You!!! I'd not seen this informative site before and the article "Golden Girl" only reinforced what I had long been telling my acrylic students about the use of acrylic mediums vs "thinning with water." I've bookmarked this site for future exploration. Thanks again for bringing it to attention.

deLYNNEation
10-24-2004, 08:37 PM
You're welcome, Jaxas. Somewhere on the Wetcanvas website is an archive of his posts (I think!) but the same archive can be found on the Painter's Keys. This artist writes so well it's like having an instructor that writes you an inspirational letter each week, to keep you plugging away and striving for better work. (note to self: time to buy his book).

I know it's been posted a few times here on Wetcanvas but since it's so worthy I thought it a good idea to bring it up again.

timelady
10-25-2004, 05:27 AM
I thought it was interesting too and scoured the Golden website for info about the 'Golden University'. I'm guessing it's the artist programme where they all have Masters in fine art? *sigh* shame really. I'd LOVE to attend this sort of thing. Alas I don't have any Masters in fine art. Maybe after the new year I'll write to them and enquire a bit further. (if a US science degree, two humanities masters, 3 years private art study, and a physics degree in progress aren't enough... *sigh*) And there's no UK artist on the list! :)

Tina.

deLYNNEation
10-25-2004, 01:29 PM
Tina -
You sound like you want to be a part of the 'working artist' program - is that it? I don't believe there actually IS a Golden Univ., it's just a corporate label I assume. Did you confirm they all have MFA's? I also have MFA envy but I'm not about to pursue that one at this point in my life. Worked too hard to get other initials after my name, I know what it takes.

Now I don't want anything after my name except 'represented by xxx galleries' !!

Holbein paints has some wonderful perks for working artists. What about W&N? There's a solid UK brand.

Here's link for Golden's working artist program:
working artist program (http://www.goldenpaints.com/artist/workart.php)

MDurante
10-26-2004, 01:32 AM
This article has good advice, and helps to confirm what I've found by experimentation. I avoid mediums with matting agents like the plague, and stick to the gloss. I've also been spraying isolation coats between layers of paint; an HVLP sprayer works well for this (as suggested by Golden's tech. support).

- Matthew Durante

MDurante
10-26-2004, 01:40 AM
Actually this struck me:

> Is it okay to force-dry acrylics? “Not a good idea.”--(force-drying interferes with the formation of the hexagonal shape of the binder molecule)

Is this true? Anyone care to comment?

(I'm something of a hairdryer junkie :D )

- Matthew Durante

timelady
10-26-2004, 06:32 AM
Yup, working artists programme. That's it. :) It does say they all have MFAs. I don't have MFA envy thankfully.

Hmm... I could look into the other brands. But I only use Golden paints anyway, with the occassional Liquitex tube. I think the main idea behind the working artist programmes are teaching, which I'm not interested in very much (though that could change). It's the chemistry and technical info I'd love to learn properly. I've not even found a good book on that topic, just bits and pieces that I pick up randomly (and Einion's posts! :D).

Tina.

Einion
10-28-2004, 03:55 AM
Jack, thinning with water alone is not the problem a lot of people continue to insist it is. Whether thinning with water alone is an issue depends on context, support and the type of paint you're using (remembering that acrylics are very well supplied in the binder department).

If you're painting on unprimed paper for example you certainly aren't going to have problems with the paint lifting at any dilution; if you're painting on primed canvas with a stiff brush then you could quite easily have problems. Blanket advice is best left to issues with no grey areas and we all know there aren't many of those.

Einion

deLYNNEation
10-28-2004, 01:27 PM
In the readers' responses to the column I mentioned above, there are plenty of answers given by a 'technical advisor' , a graduate of Golden University.

Questions like 'what's an isolation coat' is answered here:

golden acrylics Q&A (http://www.painterskeys.com/clickbacks/golden.asp)

Andrew
10-28-2004, 05:46 PM
Jack, thinning with water alone is not the problem a lot of people continue to insist it is. Whether thinning with water alone is an issue depends on context, support and the type of paint you're using (remembering that acrylics are very well supplied in the binder department).

If you're painting on unprimed paper for example you certainly aren't going to have problems with the paint lifting at any dilution; if you're painting on primed canvas with a stiff brush then you could quite easily have problems. Blanket advice is best left to issues with no grey areas and we all know there aren't many of those.

Einion

Exactly! The very nature of the process in making the polymer, makes a high percentage of the total solids, binder. And no amount of additional binder is going to make the paint adhere well to an improperly prepared support, or one that isn't porous enough for acrylic.

When water soluable acrylics first came out, the only medium was water. And there is a lot of the professional work from that era still survives to this day. You have to look a bit sideways at this advice. The person giving it works for a paint manufacturer. So while there is certain truths contained therein, it is still bent to sell more product.

Any additive added, for the most part, has to be to the choice of the artist. Chemically, the only truth is the thinner the binder, the more porous and absorbant the support needs to be. So if you need very thin and transparent color, and you are painting on a well primed canvas or board, then water alone is probably not the best choice. But thinning to a consitency similar to heavy ink, ,tempera, or gouache, then water is perfectly acceptable. The paint is still well within the percent solids ratio for good stable polymerization.

As to speed drying. On a polymer level, it isn't the greatest idea. It can result in weak spots in the film and incomplete polymerization.

Andrew

MDurante
10-28-2004, 07:46 PM
As to speed drying. On a polymer level, it isn't the greatest idea. It can result in weak spots in the film and incomplete polymerization.


Thanks Andrew, I'll need to learn more about this. As I find Golden's glazing liquid (retarder+medium) essential for large glazes, giving me almost enough time to work out brushstrokes, I tend to use the hairdryer to increase productivity. I haven't noticed a problem but it probably would be something I can't see.

Anyway, not trying to hijack the thread,

- Matthew Durante

John H
10-28-2004, 09:29 PM
I try not to use a hair dryer but when I do, afterwards I pick up the panel or canvas and fan it back & forth to cool it back down before I continue painting. I don't know if that accomplishes anything but I have a bad feeling about applying wet room-temperature paint to a hot surface; seems it would be hard on the brush and probably not good for the paint layering.

Andrew
10-29-2004, 12:23 PM
Thanks Andrew, I'll need to learn more about this. As I find Golden's glazing liquid (retarder+medium) essential for large glazes, giving me almost enough time to work out brushstrokes, I tend to use the hairdryer to increase productivity. I haven't noticed a problem but it probably would be something I can't see.

Anyway, not trying to hijack the thread,

- Matthew Durante

There are a lot of other factors that will affect the outcome. If you are painting with heavy paint, then a hair dryer won't make a difference. But you may see some weakening in the film or in the adhesion with thin glazes, unless you are working on a very porous surface. Then there is the pigment effect. Some pigments (like Raw Umber I believe) act as a sort of catalyst, and already speed the "drying". Then take in account relative humidity, temperature, and surface area covered, etc, etc, etc. To be honest you may not ever notice a problem.

I have used a hair dryer, a few time, and I only noticed a problem once, but it was only a study, and the piece held together long enough for me to get what I needed out of it.

Andrew

Einion
10-29-2004, 08:53 PM
If you use a hairdryer on thicker applications of paint it does tend to dry the paint on the surface while leaving it unset below, so you have to watch out for this. FWIW I've used one to speed drying a lot (on thin layers) and I've never noticed a problem when applying subsequent paint that I would attribute to the use of the hairdryer.

Einion

Enchanted
10-30-2004, 11:07 AM
Dare I suggest a heat lamp as an alternative to using a hair dryer? Look ma, NO HANDS! You can set the work under the heat lamp and go on about other things while it does it's drying or heating.

I often find myself using two-part epoxies and polyesters for one thing or another and I have found the heat lamp does a great job of speeding the setting time. I also use a heat lamp for those times when I'm working with Prismacolors. It softens the wax of the pencils and sticks and makes blending so much easier. And for watercolors, it's a given that it helps speed the drying time and gives other controlling alternatives. In fact, I'm going to copy this to the Studio Forum since it's probably of more specific interest in that forum.