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View Full Version : OT- Deramaxx in Dogs-- WARNING!!!


mobility
10-22-2004, 11:44 PM
If your veterinarian has prescribed Deramaxx (produced by Novartis) for your dog(s), please go to the following links immediately! This drug almost killed my dog (I still may have to euthanize her if she does not improve) and everyone needs to be diligent that this does not happen to their dog.

http://home.insightbb.com/~e.murray/Overview/Overview.htm

http://home.insightbb.com/~e.murray/Crisis/crisis.html

and the FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine website:

http://www.fda.gov/cvm/default.html

to report drug problems directly to the FDA.

Product website:

http://www.deramaxx.com/home/default.asp?page=0_0

This info is pertinent to anyone taking COX-2 inhibitors, also, such as Celebrex (and Vioxx and Bextra), since Deramaxx is essentially the same drug. These drugs have only been approved for the market for a short time (2 years) and are showing increasing problems post-approval. Please tell your friends-- THIS IS NOT AN URBAN LEGEND!!!!!!!

If anyone has any questions or would like further information, please PM or email me.

These drugs can kill with one dose and if this saves even one dog (or person!), it will be worth it to raise the alarm. COX-2 inhibitors only affect a small number of individuals negatively but those that are intolerant are VERY intolerant.

Thanks

Robin

Red*Dog*Designs
10-22-2004, 11:57 PM
Thanks for the warning, I hope your pup will be ok !

lauren1024kb
10-23-2004, 12:03 AM
I think Vioxx has been taken off of the market for such problems. Sadly the FDA is much more slack about meds for animals. I also know a woman who had a rottie that was killed by Rimadyl (young healthy female taking it post-spay), and I have heard too many bad things about Proheart6 to even count.

I hope that things get better for you and your girl. Sometimes the right decision isn't the one you want to make (just had to go through this 4 weeks ago). I will be praying for you.

BettyfromRI
10-23-2004, 12:05 AM
How sad, I hope your pup is okay.
Betty

!Karen
10-23-2004, 12:17 AM
Thanks for the alert! I sure hope your dog is OK! Hugs for you both!!!!

Proheart6 was recalled in September, thankfully, I never got that for my dog.

mobility
10-23-2004, 04:04 AM
Thanks, everyone... I hope she gets better, too! Just don't give Deramaxx to your pets, whatever you do!

Hi, Lauren! I've been working on your beads but I've been a bit overwhelmed lately!

I assumed she had a brain tumor because she had a malignant melanoma a couple years ago (that was removed successfully) and when she started having seizures, balance problems, etc. etc.-- all signs of brain cancer-- I just immediately thought, "oh, man. It's back." Then I started looking at what else it could be and she has nearly every severe side effect symptom on the Deramaxx list! She had none of the symptoms before taking the drug for arthritis.

Her other favorite person is out of town until Monday and he begged and pleaded with me to wait until he got home to put her to sleep and I'm so glad he did! She's doing okay this evening-- WAY better than she was all this week-- so there's a glimmer of hope that once all the drug is out of her system she'll go back to somewhere near normal. I'm still prepared to put her out of her misery if there is no hope for her but now I need to find a new vet! How can a responsible professional not tell someone that one of the side effects of a particular drug is DEATH?!?!

We even went on a walk tonite! YAY! :clap:

I'll let you guys know when I hear more from the drug company.

Tink
10-23-2004, 04:07 AM
I'm sending the best vibes I can muster to your sweet pup... I hope all goes well. :(

jbriz
10-23-2004, 06:43 AM
OH MY GOSH! They just put my dog on Deramaxx a couple of weeks ago for arthritis!!!! I will stop it immediately! I'm so glad you posted this thread. I might have lost my little Honey if you hadn't! How could a vet give that medication to a pet owner without thoroughly telling them about the risks??? Mine casually mentioned that they would monitor her to make sure she did alright with it, but no big deal! And they sold me a year's worth of meds, too! (not cheap either....but cheaper than three months at a time) AND, they said it would be a maintenance type drug for her that she would probably take the rest of her life to cope with her problems.

Thank you so much for this thread. And I sincerely hope yours continues to improve.

NLC
10-23-2004, 01:05 PM
Thank you so much for the warning, and since our folks with dogs will read this, I'd like to add in one of my own? (And yes, I can't stand Rimadyl as I think it killed my golden... :crying: )

My puppy Oliver has had seizures since 1999. He was put on phenobarbitol and potassium bromide to control them, with doses increasing as time went on to make sure he was relatively seizure-free. This spring he started having serious trouble with his hindquarters - getting up, walking, moving at all, etc. At the recommend of my main vet, I took him to a specialist who actually cut the dosages IN HALF because both of these drugs can cause problems mimicking brain tumors (the ataxia - hindlimb weakness, and drunken gait). Within 2 days I saw an extreme difference, and he's still been relatively seizure free. He's like my puppy again, and the way he was I thought he wouldn't make it 'til Christmas this year. I never went and looked up the drugs until he was having problems, but I will in advance now!

Take care, all, and I'll be praying for your pup to be doing better also. Thanks for the information.
Nikki

mobility
10-23-2004, 01:30 PM
Deramaxx does not affect all dogs negatively-- your dog could have no problems whatsoever and could have a significant rise in its quality of life. However, regular blood, fecal and urine tests should be performed to make sure that no problems arise. If you notice any of the following, stop giving your dog the medication and call your vet:

*Vomiting
*Change in bowel movements such as change in stool color or diarrhea
*Change in drinking habits or urination
*Decrease in appetite
*Lethargy or aggressiveness

All of the above signs could be related to other problems, but they are the first clues of a problem with Deramaxx. At the FIRST sign of any of these problems, stop administering the drug and contact your veterinarian.

Also, make sure you take a stool sample and a urine sample to the vet for testing. If blood is found in either sample there is a problem. If the tests are all normal, however, your dog is probably not sensitive to the drug and will be all the more comfortable for taking it.

Novartis should put giant warning labels all over this medication and vets need to be made more aware of its potential problems. Your vet should have told you about the possible side effects before prescribing the drug but many of them know nothing about them. The original inserts included with the medication only have a tiny warning at the very top of the second column that is very easy to miss. There are new inserts included with the drug now that carry more warnings but it is still not enough.

Dover is doing much much better today, thankfully. The vet with the website link above, Dr. Ed Murray, emailed me this morning with encouraging news that she should be able to make a very good recovery and I have an appointment with my vet at noon. Although I am still very upset that he did not tell me of the potential hazards of this medication, I do not think that he is to blame as I really don't think Novartis has alerted vets to the many problems associated with the drug.

Please let me know what you find out about your dog after her tests and if there are any abnormalities, alert the FDA and Novartis immediately.

Thank you all for sending your positive vibes, prayers, etc. They're definitely working! YAY!!!!!!

Robin

OH MY GOSH! They just put my dog on Deramaxx a couple of weeks ago for arthritis!!!! I will stop it immediately! I'm so glad you posted this thread. I might have lost my little Honey if you hadn't! How could a vet give that medication to a pet owner without thoroughly telling them about the risks??? Mine casually mentioned that they would monitor her to make sure she did alright with it, but no big deal! And they sold me a year's worth of meds, too! (not cheap either....but cheaper than three months at a time) AND, they said it would be a maintenance type drug for her that she would probably take the rest of her life to cope with her problems.

Thank you so much for this thread. And I sincerely hope yours continues to improve.

mobility
10-23-2004, 01:53 PM
Nikki--

We must have been posting at the same time...

I'm so sorry to hear about your poor Golden! Rimadyl is another problem child in the NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) family-- it is not as powerful as Deramaxx but causes the same reactions in animals that are intolerant to it.

Aspirin is the best-known NSAID. Giving your dog buffered or children's aspirin is an alternative to the heavier drugs but also must be monitored since it can cause stomach ulcers and other problems as well. Ascriptin (sp?) is Maalox-coated aspirin that is supposedly well-tolerated by dogs. It's best to talk to your vet about any of the information I have provided in this thread as I am NOT a veterinarian so I am NOT qualified to give anything but my non-professional opinion.

My vet put my dog on phenobarbitol after she had the three seizures on Monday. The first dose made her rather woozy but the second dose was way too much for her. I have not given her any more of it and she has not had another seizure. Hopefully, as the Deramaxx leaves her system entirely, the seizures will stop as well. I can hope so, anyway! Seizures are not the only problem she has had since starting on Deramaxx, BTW, but she had never had one in her 13 years prior to taking the drug, so I'm pretty sure it goes along with all the other problems she's been having.

I'm SO glad that your puppy Oliver is doing well. Watching your dog have a seizure is a really unpleasant experience but apparently, just like humans, they have no memory of the event and it is much more traumatic to watch than to be the victim. That's what I keep telling myself, anyway!

Thank you so much for the warning, and since our folks with dogs will read this, I'd like to add in one of my own? (And yes, I can't stand Rimadyl as I think it killed my golden... :crying: )

My puppy Oliver has had seizures since 1999. He was put on phenobarbitol and potassium bromide to control them, with doses increasing as time went on to make sure he was relatively seizure-free. This spring he started having serious trouble with his hindquarters - getting up, walking, moving at all, etc. At the recommend of my main vet, I took him to a specialist who actually cut the dosages IN HALF because both of these drugs can cause problems mimicking brain tumors (the ataxia - hindlimb weakness, and drunken gait). Within 2 days I saw an extreme difference, and he's still been relatively seizure free. He's like my puppy again, and the way he was I thought he wouldn't make it 'til Christmas this year. I never went and looked up the drugs until he was having problems, but I will in advance now!

Take care, all, and I'll be praying for your pup to be doing better also. Thanks for the information.
Nikki

lauren1024kb
10-23-2004, 02:33 PM
There are many effective alternatives for arthritis. Glucosamine and chondroitin is the most common, but Glycoflex is another effective option (have seen NSAID doses cut in half with Glycoflex use). There are also herbal preparations that I have heard good things about.

There are also alternative therapies that might help Dover. Milk thistle can help the liver, but I have no idea about the dose or specifics so you would have to find those. The funny thing is that working for a vet and seeing what it did to my dog is the main reason that I have become interested in alternative therapies.

If Dover were my dog I would ditch the pheno too. It is a road you don't want to go down unless you have to because of the increasing doses needed.

KariFL
10-23-2004, 02:48 PM
If you have a dog with seizures that you are having to give ever increasing doses of pheno to control. Have your vet check his thyroid levels (not all vets do, mine just happened to have come back from a conference where it was discussed.) My dog is now on Levothrhyroxine Sodium and I have cut the pheno down to less than a third of what he was taking. He now only has breakthrough seizures about every 8 months, much better than every three weeks.

Kari

Robin Poff
10-23-2004, 03:02 PM
I am so sorry about your dog! I hope she recovers!
Guys don't be too hard on Vets, they like human Doctors only have the paper work and what a "salesman" tells them!
They can not posibly read up and know everything about every new and old drug on the market, and they honestly are trying to help.
Hugs to everyone and their pups!
Robin

jbriz
10-23-2004, 05:11 PM
I will have to say that I was totally frightened upon reading this thread earlier today and frustrated with my vet for not warning me about the risks of Deramaxx. However, I have calmed down since then and don't really blame my vet. I shouldn't have reacted so quickly against her. (shame on me!) Like you said, vets may not have that information when they prescribe the meds. I truly believe my vet does care for the animals she treats. Plus, there simply isn't the control for animal care that there is for humans. Fortunately, there are ways to obtain valuable information for our "furry family members"....even in such places as glass forums! I'll be checking with my vet to see what to do for my dog. In the meantime, I am grateful to have stumbled across the information here on WC.

mobility
10-23-2004, 05:59 PM
I am so sorry about your dog! I hope she recovers!
Guys don't be too hard on Vets, they like human Doctors only have the paper work and what a "salesman" tells them!
They can not posibly read up and know everything about every new and old drug on the market, and they honestly are trying to help.
Hugs to everyone and their pups!
Robin

I totally agree-- vets do the best they can with the information provided to them by drug companies. It is easy to get angry and frustrated and lash out and after taking my dog to see her vet today I feel much better about all he has done to try and help her. He's going to stop prescribing Deramaxx until he researches it further and is also going to help me get all her records together to send to the FDA on Monday, along with writing them a letter and calling Novartis for me, since I didn't get very far trying to talk to them myself.

I found out about this new drug today, too, so add this to the list:

FDA approved a new veterinary NSAID called Previcox in August. It is a
derivative of Vioxx chemically. It was developed by Merck, the developer of
Vioxx, although it is being marketed by Merial. Just in the past week, the
FDA asked Novartis for more information on their new human NSAID, Prexige,
delaying approval of it.

JoyceMI
10-23-2004, 06:34 PM
Wow! I hope your pup keeps improving and getting better. Too Scary!

My dog was on deramaxx for about a week only at the beginnig of October. He was taking this as an anti-inflamatory for inflamed skin on his elbow. .... Glad to report he did not have any problems at all with it. If he ever has to take it again I will be leary though and will definately watch and moniter him.

I am just curious though what was the dose that your dog was given. Mine was given 50mg a day and his weight is like 175lbs. So that may have been a small dose in comparison to size. .... Just curious if dosage has anything to do here.

mobility
10-23-2004, 07:08 PM
My dog was given the same dose (50 mg/day) and she weighs 60lbs. The product insert states 1.4- 1.8 mg/lb/day for post-operative pain and about half of that for daily arthritis therapy. My younger dog had no problem when taking it, either. She also took it for a short amount of time, but for inflammation from an injury. It worked very well for that.

Most dogs don't have a problem with these drugs when taking them for short time periods. The real problem is that nobody knows what the cumulative effects of these drugs are. Since COX-2 enzymes are necessary for the kidneys to function, using it as daily therapy in dogs and humans is really not a good idea until it is determined that it does not destroy the functionality of the kidneys and liver over significant time periods.

I'm sorry if I scared anybody with this thread. That was not my intention. I just wanted everyone to know what this drug has the POTENTIAL to do so that they could be informed when speaking to their vets. Anti-Inflammatories help lots of animals but there are some rare instances where the animal has a negative reaction. Ask your vet (and doctor) about ANY medications they prescribe so that you can make an informed decision about whether to administer any drug. This particular drug seems to have more negative reactions than most, though, so I wanted to give everyone the heads-up and tell you my story so that it didn't happen to anyone else.

Wow! I hope your pup keeps improving and getting better. Too Scary!

My dog was on deramaxx for about a week only at the beginnig of October. He was taking this as an anti-inflamatory for inflamed skin on his elbow. .... Glad to report he did not have any problems at all with it. If he ever has to take it again I will be leary though and will definately watch and moniter him.

I am just curious though what was the dose that your dog was given. Mine was given 50mg a day and his weight is like 175lbs. So that may have been a small dose in comparison to size. .... Just curious if dosage has anything to do here.

JoyceMI
10-23-2004, 07:54 PM
Nothing wronge with enlightening others for the potential problems that could occur with long term use. I think I didn't realize you were refferring to that at first.

I do have to say that I made a mistake in how much I posted that Max was taking, he took 150mg a day not 50mg. Dont know what I was thinking in my first post, cuz he took one and a half tablets a day and the tablets were 100mg. Some mathemetician I am. :rolleyes:

Let us know how your pups improving over the next days.




My dog was given the same dose (50 mg/day) and she weighs 60lbs. The product insert states 1.4- 1.8 mg/lb/day for post-operative pain and about half of that for daily arthritis therapy. My younger dog had no problem when taking it, either. She also took it for a short amount of time, but for inflammation from an injury. It worked very well for that.

Most dogs don't have a problem with these drugs when taking them for short time periods. The real problem is that nobody knows what the cumulative effects of these drugs are. Since COX-2 enzymes are necessary for the kidneys to function, using it as daily therapy in dogs and humans is really not a good idea until it is determined that it does not destroy the functionality of the kidneys and liver over significant time periods.

I'm sorry if I scared anybody with this thread. That was not my intention. I just wanted everyone to know what this drug has the POTENTIAL to do so that they could be informed when speaking to their vets. Anti-Inflammatories help lots of animals but there are some rare instances where the animal has a negative reaction. Ask your vet (and doctor) about ANY medications they prescribe so that you can make an informed decision about whether to administer any drug. This particular drug seems to have more negative reactions than most, though, so I wanted to give everyone the heads-up and tell you my story so that it didn't happen to anyone else.

NLC
10-24-2004, 12:11 AM
Nikki--

We must have been posting at the same time...

I'm so sorry to hear about your poor Golden! Rimadyl is another problem child in the NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) family-- it is not as powerful as Deramaxx but causes the same reactions in animals that are intolerant to it.
...
My vet put my dog on phenobarbitol after she had the three seizures on Monday. The first dose made her rather woozy but the second dose was way too much for her. I have not given her any more of it and she has not had another seizure. Hopefully, as the Deramaxx leaves her system entirely, the seizures will stop as well. I can hope so, anyway! Seizures are not the only problem she has had since starting on Deramaxx, BTW, but she had never had one in her 13 years prior to taking the drug, so I'm pretty sure it goes along with all the other problems she's been having.

I'm SO glad that your puppy Oliver is doing well. Watching your dog have a seizure is a really unpleasant experience but apparently, just like humans, they have no memory of the event and it is much more traumatic to watch than to be the victim. That's what I keep telling myself, anyway!

Re: Star, my golden. He had to be put down due to "bleeding out" from unexplainable stomach problems... The only drug he was on was Rimadyl for hip pain, as we had already tried the glocosamine and it hadn't really helped. However, he had what the Penn hip test said was in the worst 10% of all goldens tested for hips, so with that on his breeding record I don't honestly know if it was the Rimadyl or a genetic problem. I don't blame the vet for trying to help him, as the Rimadyl does not affect all dogs badly. I just hate that I lost my first puppy when he was only 4 & 1/2 years old. :crying:

As for Oliver and the seizures... Unfortunately, they freak him out badly. He follows me around closely for the rest of the day, and if they happen at night, he refuses to go back to sleep. (Normally they happen while he's asleep.) The vet was worried about stasis since he had 3 seizures within 12 hours- stasis is non-stop seizures and can cause brain damage. It is one of the most frightening things I've experienced to wake up with my 122# "baby" laying half on top of me having a seizure, and I can't imagine how it feels on his end.

I hope your pup is done with the seizures. Oliver was woozy at first from the phenobarb also, but I'm guessing your furbaby was given a higher dose at first to try to curb any future ones. I forget the term, but it's loading up since it normally takes a while to build up in the system.

Kari - Thanks so much for the thyroid info. I'll call and check with my vet Monday to see if we're doing that. I know he checks levels twice a year and does a vet screen at the same time, so I'll see if thyroid is included. The increasing levels were over years due to (in theory) tolerance level increasing, and he was still within tolerance for drug amounts in his system. He's currently on 6 grains phenobarb a day, and 1500mg Pot. Bromide as a "helper" to make the phenobarb work better.

FYI - info from my specialist vet - if a drug is likely to cause ulcers and it's in a capsule form, open it up, dissolve it in a small amount of water and pour it on food to greatly reduce likelihood of ulcers.

Wow, this is turning into an essay, but one last thing... I was never against the vet I take Oliver to, I like him and feel he is doing the best he knows how to do with any animals that come to him. He was crying along with me when we had to put Star down, and he was doing anything he could to save him. I like that he will recommend a specialist if he thinks it will help, and that he works with her also to do what's best. As with anyone, they can only work with what they know, and nobody can know anything.

Very informative thread, thanks all!!
Nikki (& Oliver, snoozing next to me)

mobility
10-25-2004, 05:48 AM
Hello all--

My dog continues to improve, but will never be the same wonderful, life-loving, independent, happy creature that she was before taking Deramaxx. She still has tremors and falls over (collapses) with little or no warning. She is cranky and depressed. She fell off the porch yesterday and it's a miracle she didn't break a hip or worse. Her other person will be home tomorrow and since he loves her as much as I do, we'll decide together whether we can spend 24 hours a day watching her or not. If working for a living and money were no object, I'd have no problem caring for her... sadly, life gets in the way. Since he lives across town, logistics dictate that it is probably not in the cards. We'll see.

After scouring the net over the past 48 hours and talking to my vet, I have found out a lot. First and foremost is that no matter what tests your vet may do on your dog prior to prescribing COX-2 inhibitor drugs, there is NO WAY to know how your pet will react to these types of drugs (even more importantly, if you are considering taking COX-2 inhibiting drugs, there is no way for you to know how you will react!!!). My vet did two full-panel blood screenings prior to prescribing Deramaxx to my dog. Since there is no litmus test prior to the ingestion of these drugs, they are highly dangerous in my opinion.

Rimadyl has far more documented cases of adverse reactions than Deramaxx, but it has been prescribed to over 10 million dogs (with nearly 10,000 deaths related to it)! Since Deramaxx has only been on the market for two years (verses 7 years for Rimadyl), it has far fewer documented cases, but the adverse reactions are far more severe.

If your dog vomits or acts strangely in any way after taking any anti-inflammatory of any kind, take it to your vet or to an emergency clinic immediately. Tell them that it is having an auto-immune system reaction to a drug. Do not back down. It may be the only way to save your dog's life. Most vets do not know of the severe side effects that are possible with these drugs, and if they do, they will deny it. Liability is just as much of an issue with veterinarians as it is with medical doctors. COX-2 inhibiting drugs are marketed as a "safe" alternative to other NSAID drugs but they are NOT SAFE!!!!

My dog is relatively lucky, as far as reactions go, since she did not die a horrible death within 24-48 hours of initially ingesting Deramaxx. Reading some of the other case studies has been some of the most heartbreaking research I have ever done. Very few dogs that have negative reactions to Cox-2 inhibiting drugs survive. Less than 10%, in fact. The number of humans that die from these drugs is much smaller, probably due to the fact that as soon as they feel strange after taking the drugs, they say so. Dogs have no such voice to express their discomfort.

Please remember that you know your pets better than anybody, no matter what the tests may show. If you feel, in your gut, that there is a problem, there is one. Follow your instincts. DO NOT BACK DOWN TO CLEVER MARKETING SCHEMES!!!!!!!! Drug companies employ many skilled marketers that are astute at convincing people that what they know to be true isn't. No matter what they say to convince you that there is no problem with their drug, that it's all in your head, that there must be some underlying problem unrelated to their miracle drug, DO NOT BELIEVE IT!!!! These drugs can kill in a single dose to an intolerant patient. They are NOT SAFE, even according to the FDA guidelines that they were approved under.

I love my animals as part of my family. I know many of you do, too. Please spread the word that COX-2 inhibitors are unsafe for any species. Stick to buffered aspirin or naproxen sodium (alleve) for arthritis pain. Ascriptin (maalox-coated aspirin) is relatively safe for most dogs, as well as humans. Lauren added a bunch of other alternatives. I will keep updating all of you on what I find out from all sources.

Go safely and happily,
love all as if it were yourself,
and laugh as much as possible! :D

JoyceMI
10-25-2004, 09:17 AM
Hi Robin-

Glad to hear you are seeing some gradual improvement. Sory to hear she is still having some side effects. It has only been a couple days, so hopefully she will keep improving. It may take some time.

Can she be confined to an area when you are not home to watch her, to make sure she doesn't fall or something. Chances are she will sleep mostly while you are gone.

Did your vet not give you the paper insert that goes with the Deramaxx when he gave you the meds. My vet included it with mine, it was still attatched to the bottle just as it comes from the maker......... I have to admit I did not read it before giving it to Max, I trusted in my vet, but also knew that the info was there, incase I started seeing any strange side effects, I would have gotten it out and read it..... Your vet should have included that with it, or at least told you some stuff up front!

You've given lots of good info here and have enlightened lots of us, I'm sure.

Will keep your doggy in my thoughts and hope for more improvement!

.

bolimasa
10-25-2004, 11:29 AM
this may be purely anecdotal, but if your dog is having seizures don't rule out something as simple as diet. When I was in high school we had a dog who had seizures. The first was while making a pit stop at a a gas station in rural GA while traveling home from FL. Scared the bejesus out of us, we thought he was going to die on the spot. Fortunately, he was OK, but continued to have siezures every once in a while. It turned out that too much protein (or so we thought), set them off. He could not eat meaty table scraps or he would seize. With a diet of dry food and veggies he'd do fine. The funny thing about this dog is that he absolutely loved veggies, especially iceberg lettuce. I guess he new what was good for him. You'd open the crisper drawer and he'd come a running, ready to do all his tricks (he was a teri-poo mutt who could walk on his hind legs and dance and do quite an assortment of tricks)

mobility
10-25-2004, 02:50 PM
Hi Robin-

Glad to hear you are seeing some gradual improvement. Sory to hear she is still having some side effects. It has only been a couple days, so hopefully she will keep improving. It may take some time.

Can she be confined to an area when you are not home to watch her, to make sure she doesn't fall or something. Chances are she will sleep mostly while you are gone.

Did your vet not give you the paper insert that goes with the Deramaxx when he gave you the meds. My vet included it with mine, it was still attatched to the bottle just as it comes from the maker......... I have to admit I did not read it before giving it to Max, I trusted in my vet, but also knew that the info was there, incase I started seeing any strange side effects, I would have gotten it out and read it..... Your vet should have included that with it, or at least told you some stuff up front!

You've given lots of good info here and have enlightened lots of us, I'm sure.

Will keep your doggy in my thoughts and hope for more improvement!

.

Hi, Joyce-

Thanks for thinking of my girl. I could confine her to one part of the house but I have hard wood floors everywhere and I'm concerned that she might fall over, injure herself, not be able to get up, and lay there in agony until I get home. :crying: So for now, I watch her and wait for Stuart to get home. Later today! Yay!

The vet did not include the insert with the Deramaxx when he gave it to me. Actually, he did not give it to me. The other vet at his office did. I do not like her-- she is not very good with animals in general and I don't trust her judgement. She has said some things to me that don't make any sense in the past so it is not a new issue. My pets don't seem to like her very much, either, but I don't know if it's because they feel that I don't like her or what. I try to go to the office on days she's not there but it's not always possible.

Anyway, as soon as I know more I will let you guys know.

Bolimasa-- my dog's diet hasn't changed in years so I know that isn't it. Dogs do not usually start having seizures at 13. The only thing that has changed is the medication. I wish I had read the insert, or at least been aware of how dangerous these drugs can be. Please don't give them to your pets or take them yourself.

NLC
10-26-2004, 12:51 AM
this may be purely anecdotal, but if your dog is having seizures don't rule out something as simple as diet. When I was in high school we had a dog who had seizures. The first was while making a pit stop at a a gas station in rural GA while traveling home from FL. Scared the bejesus out of us, we thought he was going to die on the spot. Fortunately, he was OK, but continued to have siezures every once in a while. It turned out that too much protein (or so we thought), set them off. He could not eat meaty table scraps or he would seize. With a diet of dry food and veggies he'd do fine. The funny thing about this dog is that he absolutely loved veggies, especially iceberg lettuce. I guess he new what was good for him. You'd open the crisper drawer and he'd come a running, ready to do all his tricks (he was a teri-poo mutt who could walk on his hind legs and dance and do quite an assortment of tricks)

*jaw drops* Did I mention my Oliver begs for apples and potatoes?!?!? We've had ribs and he's begging for the pineapple I served along with them?
Too weird... Thanks for the info. I know weight is an issue since he is fed drugs based on that, but I never thought about the food.

pamelac
07-12-2012, 11:52 PM
Our 15 year old chocolate lab had some arthritist in his hind quarters, so we thought we were doing him a favor by taking him into the vet & having the vet assess him & put him on 1/2 tab of 75mg DERAMAXX.
Our lab went into a seizure on the 6th day of dosage on this medication. He has never had a seizure before.
He is still in bad shape & is not eating after nearly 2 days.
I wished the vet would have informed us that he may not be a good candiate for DERAMAXX because he has a heart arrythmia already, and to look for any signs.
:( WARNING: DO NOT GIVE THIS MED TO YOUR PET-without asking your vet several questions before administering this to your pet. Always ask for a DRUG INFORMATION SHEET(which he did not provide)....This nearly killed our dog & we are still hoping he pulls out of it. Thank you..