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CarlyHardy
10-22-2004, 12:52 AM
I'm sure all of you will be delighted with this new article on how to design your own Christmas Cards. An excellent demonstration with tips on sizing and printing! :clap:

A big thank you to Marilyn Speck Ballard, our contributing editor, for an excellent article!

Check it out at Design Your Own Christmas Cards (http://www.wetcanvas.com/Articles2/35425/528/)

and then share your own designs with the group!
carly
Article Publisher

Leslie_Ann
10-22-2004, 10:21 AM
Marilyn, I hope you get to read my compliments! I loved your tutorial and your example. So pretty!! I even got into the spirit a little from reading it. :)
Thanks for taking the time and making the effort to share that and I've put it on my Wish List of things to do over the holidays. :)

marilyn h
10-22-2004, 01:14 PM
From one Marilyn to another Marilyn. I really like your Christmas card article. Very interesting. I appreciate your sharing these ideas with me. I am slow at everything, so I best try this out soon. Or it will be next Christmas 2005 before I get them done. Thank you.

Marilyn Speck Ballard
10-22-2004, 06:29 PM
I'm sure all of you will be delighted with this new article on how to design your own Christmas Cards. An excellent demonstration with tips on sizing and printing! :clap:

A big thank you to Marilyn Speck Ballard, our contributing editor, for an excellent article!

Check it out at Design Your Own Christmas Cards (http://www.wetcanvas.com/Articles2/35425/528/)

and then share your own designs with the group!
carly
Article Publisher

Thank you, Carly, for your kind words.

A big portion of credit and thanks goes to Rose Queen for guiding me through the steps of instruction and things totally foreign to me, to ready this article for publication.

Sincerely,

Marilyn

Marilyn Speck Ballard
10-22-2004, 06:50 PM
Marilyn, I hope you get to read my compliments! I loved your tutorial and your example. So pretty!! I even got into the spirit a little from reading it. :)
Thanks for taking the time and making the effort to share that and I've put it on my Wish List of things to do over the holidays. :)

Leslie, thank you for your lovely compliments.

I really do enjoy making the cards, or at least designing them now. It extends the beautiful season so much more. I do have to start early, however. I didn't used to, and then I would really be humping to meet the deadline.

Check out the Art Project list. I think I listed it as Christmas Card Design 2004, a week ago. It shows a lot of different media, and early Ballard,too.

Marilyn :)

Marilyn Speck Ballard
10-22-2004, 06:59 PM
From one Marilyn to another Marilyn. I really like your Christmas card article. Very interesting. I appreciate your sharing these ideas with me. I am slow at everything, so I best try this out soon. Or it will be next Christmas 2005 before I get them done. Thank you.

Thank you, too, Marilyn

Yes, do get started as soon as you can, even if it's only a few. If not, one bright note, at least you'll have a jump on next year. :wink2:

Happy painting!

Marilyn B. :)

Marya
10-25-2004, 03:23 PM
Dear Marilyn,

Thank you so much for your wonderful article. The card you used for an example is so beautiful, too!

Coincidentally, I am due to start teaching an adult watercolor class next week. Do you mind if I show the students your article?

Also, I have a couple of questions:
How do you print up your cards, and how do you market them?
Do you invent the compositions, or do you work from photographs?

Thanks again, Marilyn. This is my first post on wetcanvas, I was really inspired to write my appreciation!

Best Wishes,
Marya

Marilyn Speck Ballard
10-25-2004, 06:39 PM
Dear Marilyn,

Thank you so much for your wonderful article. The card you used for an example is so beautiful, too!

Coincidentally, I am due to start teaching an adult watercolor class next week. Do you mind if I show the students your article?

Also, I have a couple of questions:
How do you print up your cards, and how do you market them?
Do you invent the compositions, or do you work from photographs?

Thanks again, Marilyn. This is my first post on wetcanvas, I was really inspired to write my appreciation!

Best Wishes,
Marya

Marya,

Thank you for taking the time to write. I'm pleased and flattered that you'd use it as a lesson to teach from. Yes, You may.

Unfortunately, I don't have sales enough to warrent having large volumes printed at any one time, therefore passing the savings on to the customer. If One can afford to have the "print set-up" put on a disc,(around $40-$50) that would avoid the set-up (color adjusting) charge each time and then just call the order in. Saves time, as well.

I've always been a teacher and not a marketing expert. I have lots to learn, too. You'll get a break in price around the 50's and 100's usually. Envelopes are extra, and office supply stores most likely have a better price.

Find a good lazer printer (check out his work) and tell him what size your want your finished cards , and be sure he knows exactly what you want (border, one or two images to a page, what kind of paper,etc,) and how many prints you need. Paper with much "tooth" (roughness) will not pick up the color as well.

If you have two images, 5x7 on an 8 1/2 x 11 page, be sure to leave enough room in the middle (gutter) for borders, if you wish to include your title and signature on each card. Don't forget your copywrite symbol and date.

Machine cutting or trimming, machine scoring for folding, and printed verses are all extra costs, as well. If you are doing only your personal cards, you probably can manage that much, and at considerable savings.

I collect all kinds of photos and printed material for my resource files for references. I make up some ideas, or take artist license and move a tree etc., here or there. Most of my Christmas card designs were inspired by the surroundings where I live. I have a collection in the "Artist Projects" archives, 2004 Christmas Card Design, and all of the more recent ones are on my website. Please visit.

If I can be of further help, please ask.

pampe
10-25-2004, 07:25 PM
I'm confused...is this a project too?

Marilyn Speck Ballard
10-25-2004, 07:54 PM
I'm confused...is this a project too?
Hi, Pampe,

Sure! Jump right in. The more the merrier!! We love to see what others are doing.

Marilyn

pampe
10-26-2004, 12:11 PM
Hi, Marilyn

I wondered if this was an ACTUAL PROJECT since it is in the WATERCOLOR PROJECTS FORUM???

I don't see it listed. :confused:

FriendCarol
10-28-2004, 06:54 AM
... If One can afford to have the "print set-up" put on a disc,(around $40-$50) that would avoid the set-up (color adjusting) charge each time and then just call the order in. Saves time, as well.
...
Find a good lazer [sic] printer (check out his work) and tell him what size your want your finished cards , and be sure he knows exactly what you want (border, one or two images to a page, what kind of paper,etc,) and how many prints you need.

If you have PageMaker, you can do your own 'print setup' and save the money. You only need two things (aside from PageMaker or similar software itself, of course): a "driver" for the printer (machine) that you want your printer (person or company :rolleyes: ) to use; and a properly calibrated monitor, so you can see exactly what colors you'll be asking the printer to produce. (PageMaker offers you the option to set itself up to work with various monitor calibration systems as you install it.)

Then just (1) print your cards by choosing the printer for which you've acquired (downloaded, usually) the driver, (2) "print" your file to disk (there should be a checkbox for this), and (3) take disk to printer. When you print, tell PageMaker you are printing color separations (usually CMYK, or 4-color) if that's what it is -- unless your printer is using one of the newer inkjet-type printers that print all the colors at once. Even the 4-color printers (which pass the paper through the printer 4 times to mix the separate colors) will produce good results -- that's how "full-color" magazines were printed, at least until about a decade ago!

P.S. If I get my scanner re-installed before Christmas (i.e., if I get the CD-ROM's bad connector replaced), I'll try to post a leftover card I did in gouache for 2002... Don't think I did anything last year.

Katybrowneyes
11-01-2004, 06:51 PM
I love this method. I take several painting classes. In one of them, we were just taught this method. It is super. I also use that form of masking, and it is superior. You must be very careful with the salt and make sure your paint is neither too thin or thick or it won't work. Have fun.

Marilyn Speck Ballard
11-01-2004, 10:34 PM
If you have PageMaker, you can do your own 'print setup' and save the money. You only need two things (aside from PageMaker or similar software itself, of course): a "driver" for the printer (machine) that you want your printer (person or company :rolleyes: ) to use; and a properly calibrated monitor, so you can see exactly what colors you'll be asking the printer to produce. (PageMaker offers you the option to set itself up to work with various monitor calibration systems as you install it.)

Then just (1) print your cards by choosing the printer for which you've acquired (downloaded, usually) the driver, (2) "print" your file to disk (there should be a checkbox for this), and (3) take disk to printer. When you print, tell PageMaker you are printing color separations (usually CMYK, or 4-color) if that's what it is -- unless your printer is using one of the newer inkjet-type printers that print all the colors at once. Even the 4-color printers (which pass the paper through the printer 4 times to mix the separate colors) will produce good results -- that's how "full-color" magazines were printed, at least until about a decade ago!

P.S. If I get my scanner re-installed before Christmas (i.e., if I get the CD-ROM's bad connector replaced), I'll try to post a leftover card I did in gouache for 2002... Don't think I did anything last year.

Carol,

I appreciate your note, but I'm not sure I can accomplish it. I looked up Pagemaker software and have no idea which version I would need for Windows XP, or if I already have something comparable. Does the Adobe 6.0 have what you are talking about? ( I do have that.) I may have the equivalent of Pagemaker, and not know it, I'm such a whiz.

If you are talking about the actual printing of the cards, that's not economical for me. The ink is too costly, doesn't go very far, and the results aren't consistant with my printer.

I just want to make the CD, but I think the problem is my lack of knowledge of the scanner and printer settings. I set the resolution to 600 pixels to be able to get a truer true color and a smooth scan. Sometimes patches of color are missing, even when I insert a piece of black paper beneath the lid light and on top of the painting. I can adjust the color and resize it to send.

Unless it's not as hard as I think, probably the best bet is to just "pay the piper", and then I'll be sure of a good product.

Come on now, If I can get this whipped, you can make a new card for 2004. OK?? :clap:

Thank you much. :)

Marilyn

Malvasia
11-04-2004, 09:27 AM
Thank you Marilyn for great tutorial, I loved it and just had to try it myself:

http://www.side7.com/cgi-bin/S7SDB/Display.pl?act=image&iid=309702

Had some problems with masking fluid though.
I used it before but always on dry paper.
This time instead, to achieve the result, the paper was very wet (after masking fluid was dry ofc). Also the use of salt is something i never did before. Now, i wonder it it may be the cause. Although i waited for paper to be absolutely dry after removing the masking, it came away with large chunks of paper with it. Sooooo frustrating :(
It was good aquarel paper 200gr/m2, not cheap stuff. So where did i make a mistake?

Oh, and about the transforming it into cards, i guess i'll just do it with scanner, some image editing program and home printer ;) It's not professional, but i dont need scores of Christmas cards anyway ;)

Thanks again, also for giving me occasion to post here (my first post on wetcanvas, wheee)

Marilyn Speck Ballard
11-05-2004, 04:22 PM
Thank you Marilyn for great tutorial, I loved it and just had to try it myself:

http://www.side7.com/cgi-bin/S7SDB/Display.pl?act=image&iid=309702

Had some problems with masking fluid though.
I used it before but always on dry paper.
This time instead, to achieve the result, the paper was very wet (after masking fluid was dry ofc). Also the use of salt is something i never did before. Now, i wonder it it may be the cause. Although i waited for paper to be absolutely dry after removing the masking, it came away with large chunks of paper with it. Sooooo frustrating :(
It was good aquarel paper 200gr/m2, not cheap stuff. So where did i make a mistake?

Oh, and about the transforming it into cards, i guess i'll just do it with scanner, some image editing program and home printer ;) It's not professional, but i dont need scores of Christmas cards anyway ;)

Thanks again, also for giving me occasion to post here (my first post on wetcanvas, wheee)


Christina,

I'll repeat this note on WC incase someone else had the same problem:
"Hi, Christina,

Glad you enjoyed the tutorial. I'm puzzled as to why you lost large patches of paper, though. I've never, ever had that happen! And I've done lots of them, believe me! What weight paper did you use? (I see your answer now,) I've even used plain ol' rubber cement. ( The paper must be dry) Age of the application will sometimes cause a problem, but that couldn't have been a factor in this case. I just wonder, if heat would matter. When I use a hair dryer, I've never held it close enough to become hot. Let me know if you can figure it out. A masking removal eraser does work better than an art gum eraser. Directions on some of the masking liquids instruct to rub or peel to remove. Whatever works. Maybe try a less expensive paper???

You did a fine job, by the way. I like your composition. Thanks for the note.
You'll also find out just how much or how little salt to use, as well as how much paint, not too much or too little. Trial and error.

Nice web site, too, and thanks also for the credit and link.

Happy Painting

Marilyn

Marilyn Speck Ballard
11-07-2004, 10:11 PM
Thank you Marilyn for great tutorial, I loved it and just had to try it myself:

http://www.side7.com/cgi-bin/S7SDB/Display.pl?act=image&iid=309702

Had some problems with masking fluid though.
I used it before but always on dry paper.
This time instead, to achieve the result, the paper was very wet (after masking fluid was dry ofc). Also the use of salt is something i never did before. Now, i wonder it it may be the cause. Although i waited for paper to be absolutely dry after removing the masking, it came away with large chunks of paper with it. Sooooo frustrating :(
It was good aquarel paper 200gr/m2, not cheap stuff. So where did i make a mistake?

Oh, and about the transforming it into cards, i guess i'll just do it with scanner, some image editing program and home printer ;) It's not professional, but i dont need scores of Christmas cards anyway ;)

Thanks again, also for giving me occasion to post here (my first post on wetcanvas, wheee)

Malvasia,

Hmmm, I DID answer you, but I don't see it here. Let me know if you didn't receive it.
Marilyn

Malvasia
11-08-2004, 01:27 PM
Yes, I got answer both here and per email, thanks :)

egoodwin
12-27-2004, 01:52 PM
I really like your Christmas card article. Very interesting. I appreciate your sharing these ideas with me. I am new at everything, so I tryed this out and it was a good idia. I made two kinds and sent them out. Thank you.

Marilyn Speck Ballard
12-27-2004, 05:07 PM
I really like your Christmas card article. Very interesting. I appreciate your sharing these ideas with me. I am new at everything, so I tryed this out and it was a good idia. I made two kinds and sent them out. Thank you.

Thank you for your comments, and I'm really glad to hear from you and of your success with the project.
Happy painting,

Marilyn

Radiantruth
01-23-2005, 09:34 AM
Hi Marilyn: re Christmas cards: :clap:
your info is excellent as I teach art at a nusing home and I am searching for things we can do. I will use this info to prepare well in advance for Christmas 2005. On Dec 19, 2004 I put an art display/gallery up so the relatives could view that excellent production of art along with photo's of their production! This brought in over $500.00 as family & friends gave offerings for the art and they also rec a tax deductable reciept. Everyone was happy and now I plan on making cards not only for Christmas but for every occassion. Thanks so much for the idea. :wink2: Radiant Ruth.

Marilyn Speck Ballard
01-23-2005, 05:09 PM
Hi Marilyn: re Christmas cards: :clap:
your info is excellent as I teach art at a nusing home and I am searching for things we can do. I will use this info to prepare well in advance for Christmas 2005. On Dec 19, 2004 I put an art display/gallery up so the relatives could view that excellent production of art along with photo's of their production! This brought in over $500.00 as family & friends gave offerings for the art and they also rec a tax deductable reciept. Everyone was happy and now I plan on making cards not only for Christmas but for every occassion. Thanks so much for the idea. :wink2: Radiant Ruth.

Dear Ruth,

Your note was like a belated Christmas present! I am so pleased you were able to make such good use of the lesson, and that it was a huge success! :clap:

It's almost a no-fail project, because trees can take on so many different forms, one can hardly draw a bad tree, and by drawing and masking what is to be saved, it's pretty easy to be successful with it. Another thing, if you don't want to use the masking solution, you can use white crayons, or parafin, to block out the paint, and that part will resist most of the paint. You can't paint many details later, though.

Just remember not to overwork watercolor, (that's a toughie,) and the rule of light against dark, or dark against light. In the archives of published articles, you will also find an excellant project about design and composition, (Probably too advanced for the nursing home crowd, but gives you good insight for your own examples.) Excuse me, if I'm telling you things you already know.

I gave this same demonstration in the late fall for my art guild assoc. and they had a lot of fun with it. Some told me they sent the cards to friends and received responses that they were going to frame the cards.

Welcome to Wet Canvas! Be sure to fill out the information about yourself. Where are you from? It's fun to receive answers from all over the world.

My mother was in a nursing home for a time and my husband's mother is at the present time, in another state. They like to do more than string Cheerios, if they still have their mental capabilities. (That does make a pretty attractive necklace, however, if they can resist eating it.) :D You are doing a marvelous and very much appreciated work.

Take care, and keep in touch, in case I find something else you could use. :)

Marilyn