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View Full Version : fluid acrylic and gouache - advice


lene
10-19-2004, 06:11 PM
Hi

I wonder if anybody can explain the difference in using FLUID acrylics and gouache ? (not a question of how they are produced) - I mean when using them ?

I ask because:
I have tried gouache in "pans" and liked them.
I have tried gouache from tube, body acrylic and I've just found out, that I cannot paint with anything that can make a lump. So they are out of the question for me.

Are Fluid acrylics what they "say" - fluid as watercolor/gouache in pans? (Otherwise I will not spend the money, they seem a bit expensive, at least in DK).

I've seen lots of art-books with lessons in acrylics, can these be "translated" to using gouache (my question on top: if not: why?) - as I very rarely see art-books (wildlife/domestic animals is my interest of subject) that instructs in gouache.
But if gouache is usable I could buy the books anyway and learn from them :)

Einion
10-20-2004, 12:35 PM
Are Fluid acrylics what they "say" - fluid as watercolor/gouache in pans? (Otherwise I will not spend the money, they seem a bit expensive, at least in DK).
Fluid acrylics vary a little but they are generally about the consistency of cream. They will tend to apply smoothly and dry flat and you're unlikely to experience lumps or brush texture unless you work the paint for too long as it dries.

I've seen lots of art-books with lessons in acrylics, can these be "translated" to using gouache (my question on top: if not: why?) - as I very rarely see art-books (wildlife/domestic animals is my interest of subject) that instructs in gouache.
But if gouache is usable I could buy the books anyway and learn from them :)
Sort of. Hopefully Richard will see this as he's done more gouache than I have but the basic colour-mixing advice holds true from one medium to another up to a point. The application procedure for gouache tends to be very different - you're usually advised to apply the colour and just leave it there, with minimal blending or overlaying with the next colour because they remain very soluble and lifting the colour underneath is very easy. With acrylics there is no worry about this at all, they should be completely insoluble when dry so you can add layer upon layer.

You see less books about gouache as it is considered an illustration medium more than a paint for fine-art work. It is brittle when dry and can be damaged easily so more care has to be taken with the finished pieces than with many other types of paint.

If you like the look of gouache but would like the ease of not having to worry about lifting previous layers you might like to give Jo Sonja acrylic gouache a try. These are not gouache, just matt-finish acrylics, and they are not expensive. From using them I can say the quality is very good. You can get them from Dick Blick and other online suppliers, I don't know if they're available from any European sources I'm afraid.

Einion

Richard Saylor
10-20-2004, 09:33 PM
Just a couple of things in addition to what Einion said.

The best quality gouache I can obtain comes in tubes, not pans. It's no problem. I just squeeze the paint onto a flat palette, add a few drops of water, and mix with a small, flexible palette knife until the mixture is smooth. This works for acrylics too.

If you can't find Jo Sonja acrylic gouache, Holbein makes a similar product called Acryla Designer's Gouache. Either of these can be used in a manner similar to acrylics.

lene
10-21-2004, 05:26 PM
Hi

thank you very much for the information.
I see the important difference you mention on gouache being soluble, and acrylics insoluble :)

MsLilypond
10-21-2004, 05:41 PM
the fluid acrylics are quite soluble, well at least the Golden line is, I use them like a watercolor, the only difference once they are dry there is no lifting the color up like you can with watercolor or gouache. Have you ever used the decorative acrylic paints that come in bottles? the are sort of the consistency of those just more liquid and more pigment.