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dd50
10-15-2004, 08:50 AM
Morning Folks!

I need to paint some black frizzy (African American) hair ... and I'm not sure how to do this. I'm sure it will help to use the proper brushes, paints and strokes ... but just not sure where to start. Any suggestions?

By the way, this will actually be 'wool', since I'm painting a doll. Wool hair, if you know what I mean?

Any help you can give will be appreciated. :)

Dee

Bertoni
10-15-2004, 09:49 AM
I wonder if experimenting first on a small piece of paper or board would help.
...using stiff bristle brushes, giving them a twirl etc. What about using india ink as well in the process with a fine line penpoint...of course that might make it a mixed media painting!! Good luck with it. I'm sure other folks here would have good suggestions!! :)

mrsarthritis
10-15-2004, 12:50 PM
(This comes from an inexperienced painter) You might try using a scruffy brush with black and a little brown (not too wet, on the dry side), and "pouncing" after which you would "pounce" with perhaps a lighter color to create depth. untill you get the look you want. Hope that helps, and please post the final painting.

Liz

dd50
10-16-2004, 12:41 AM
Thank you BOTH!!!

I'll try those suggestions. :)

Hugs,
Dee

tammy
10-16-2004, 02:16 AM
I may be getting the type wrong but I think there some brushes called Hake brushes that can help with this type of thing. The have short and long hairs in the same brush and are sometimes used to paint all types of hair with.
Someone may be able to help me out with the correct name for the brush. It may help with this type of hair but I'm not quite sure.

You might even try a fan brush too.

HRH Goldie
10-16-2004, 07:02 AM
Hi - personally I would try using natural sponge and pounce the paint on in different thickness, varying shade slightly and letting dry in between. This should give you the texture and appearance you're after without any headache lol. Choose your sponge carefully though. You get different quality of results with the different textures. Natural ones are far superior and work much better than synthetic, also the holeiness (if there is a word) is key to this too. Hope this cuts down the work. :wave:

Christine

Bioartist
10-16-2004, 10:11 AM
Hi - personally I would try using natural sponge and pounce the paint on in different thickness, varying shade slightly and letting dry in between. This should give you the texture and appearance you're after without any headache lol. Choose your sponge carefully though. You get different quality of results with the different textures. Natural ones are far superior and work much better than synthetic, also the holeiness (if there is a word) is key to this too. Hope this cuts down the work. :wave:

Christine
Exactly what I was going to suggest, but I will add you could also try bath/body scrubbers, as these have an irregular pattern and thickness, it will (and does) simulate the variation in a persons hair a lot easier. Just remember to wet the sponges first, then wring out before dabbing into the paint, otherwise the sponge will draw out the water from the paint - making the paint hard to work with and the sponge impossible to clean.
Hope this helps,
Stacey