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camedeiros
10-05-2004, 10:20 PM
How can I make a "foggy" effect with acrylics. i am trying to paint a landscape (semi-abstract) and wanted to simulate a foggy morning.

chandlerjr
10-06-2004, 01:16 AM
camedeiros,
Funny, I just answered a similar question by StrawberryFields regarding mist. Basicly, you do it the same way, so I will give you the same answer. But notice my warning in bold and underlined.

It kind of depends on the type of mist/fog you want to create. If you want a more smoky mist/fog, I would mix a little prussian blue and Burnt Sienna together to produce a blackish hue. Then add a very small about of zinc white to lighten. Then mix a small amount of the resulting gray with a large amount of glazing medium--you want a grayish milky looking consistency and real transparent. Use a hog hair brush, and brush small amounts over the area, you want to be misty/foggy until you get the desired effect.

The under lying color of the painting will show through once the cloudiness of the mixture clears when dry. You may need to make several passes to get the level of mist/fog effect you want. Build it slowly or you will regret it--you could take it too far. I would definitely experiment first--this can be a costly mistake on a painting you spent a lot of time on--better safe than sorry--try it out first.
Hope this helps!
Larry C.

How can I make a "foggy" effect with acrylics. i am trying to paint a landscape (semi-abstract) and wanted to simulate a foggy morning.

Charlie's Mum
10-06-2004, 03:45 PM
Try this thread also -

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=220813.

:D

Quiet
10-06-2004, 08:29 PM
If you want a more smoky mist/fog, I would mix a little prussian blue and Burnt Sienna together to produce a blackish hue.

Good heavens, youíre offering advice on color without having seen the picture that this technique is going to be applied to?

*giggle* Okay, it is a valid way to go. Iím just not a fan of transparent layers. Bleah!

One other method is this. First, pick the color of your mist. Any color can work, it just depends on what color you want. If, for instance, you want to do a painting of a forest with a green haze, then paint the closest trees in their full range of tones, from black to white, fully saturated. Then, as the trees get farther away, add a little of the mist-color, then a little more, until the trees have vanished into it.

It takes a lot longer to do it this way, and requires more planning, but it also gives you more control.

Hereís an example: