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platapie1
09-28-2004, 07:57 PM
Hi everyone-

Any ideas on how to display a piece of canvas without stretcher bars? The painting is 4 x 5 feet, approximately, and is actually painted on both sides.

I was thinking of grommets... any ideas? I want it to be flat against the wall and I don't want to put a piece of wood at the top, behind the canvas like I just macromayed (sp?) and owl.

Also, the painting leaves about an inch and a half of raw canvas all the way around. I actually cut this canvas off the stretcher bars (that previously held it) with scissors in a...uh.. wonderfully freeing artist moment (frustration). It has a rough, uneven kind of edge which seems to work with the painting so I want to keep it.

By the way, this painting started with flipping a hopeless painting over to use the back of the canvas to play with some ideas. Nothing "serious." It ended up being my best personal work in two years, was finished in less than 4 hours and is now the start of a brand new series for me.

They say an artist's work begins in play. I now have the proof!

All I need is a way to hang it...

Thanks!

Aimee :rolleyes:

Mike Finn
09-28-2004, 08:24 PM
Aimee..

I have played around with ideas to do the same thing...never actually done it :) but one idea I had was to tack some scrim (hessian) to the wall stretched tightly and then use something like wallpaper paste to paste the painting to the scrim. When it comes time to take it down just remove the whole thing and wash off the scrim from the back of the painting.... sounds good anyway :)

Mike Finn

platapie1
09-29-2004, 11:49 AM
Hmmm. I am not totally familiar with that material - is it a light weight, transparent fabric? The idea sounds intereresting.

mame
09-29-2004, 12:03 PM
galleries/museums often use Museum Putty (don't know brand names).

It's the same stuff they use to keep ceramic works on pedestals from getting knocked over by passing elbows.

another, "artsy" way is to attach small dowels or thin bamboo horizontally all the way down with a short wire on the back so it sits very slightly off the wall. The dowels end at the ends of the sides (do not extend beyond the canvas)

One artist's work I saw - the dowels had been delicately sewn at each horizontal end.
The installation was part and parcel to the work itself.

Another option is Gater Board - thin, light weight, very firm foam core(?) used by architects and 3-d model makers

SummerSun
09-29-2004, 01:10 PM
For some reason, when I read your post, I started thinking about how animal skins used to be stretched in the primitive times... I tried to search for some photos with google to show you what I mean, but I only found this one: http://www.skillsalive.com/classes/images_classes/macconclave.jpg

Mike Finn
09-29-2004, 07:09 PM
Hmmm. I am not totally familiar with that material - is it a light weight, transparent fabric? The idea sounds intereresting.

Aimee..

It's a bit like sack material, I am showing my age but it was used in old homes to stretch over the wooden frames of the walls, then wallpaper was pasted onto that. You want something that is coarsely woven, (Maybe a fishing net might do) so that it's easy to get off later and wallpaper paste is water soluble. The advantage that I see by using that is the painting would sit flat against the wall, no ripples, almost look like it was painted on the wall. One would use a dozen or so small tacks to attach the material to the wall, stretched tightly, then use any water soluble paste to stick the painting to the material. The coarse weave would give good grip but allow for easy removal and the more I think about it a fishing net would work well. Of course the back of the painting is sealed already so washing the paste off later is no problem.

Mike Finn

platapie1
09-29-2004, 08:37 PM
The advantage that I see by using that is the painting would sit flat against the wall, no ripples, almost look like it was painted on the wall.

Interesting. Okay, something might work like that for displaying it in my home or someone else's (crossing fingers). What I am also tring to figure out is something a bit less permanent/messy for a display in a gallery. I am going to be showing this work and a few more to a gallery and want to have a clue as to how to help them hang it. (Notice my "acting as if", as in, "They will obviously want to display this masterpiece immediately!)