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kybeadmaker
09-27-2004, 10:32 AM
While in Atlanta this weekend my son took me to see a Chihuly exhiit that was in the botanical gardens there. Here are a couple of pictures. It was beautiful !!!!! Anyone else got any Chihuly pictures????
Harriet

kybeadmaker
09-27-2004, 10:38 AM
Okay..one didn't show up so I am trying it again.

Peg
09-27-2004, 10:53 AM
Believe it or not I am not a Chihuly fan, but a fan of his workmen who make all his pieces. Have you ever seen the picture of him holding a bottle of liquid color and standing and just swirling it around on paper below with lines. Not my bag as it looks like kingergarten play. His men make and put his pieces together and each time after un-packing they are randomly placed and never in the same place. The men who do his work are tremendous artists and should get more credit. Peg M

Beth Myers
09-27-2004, 11:03 AM
Harriet,
Thank you so much for the photos.
His work always leaves me breathless. I love it!
I always think it looks like the glass fairey came and sprinkled goodies all around.
Beautiful!
Beth

!ngridh
09-27-2004, 11:08 AM
I feel it is a shame when people discredit chihuly and his contribution as well as his art. He apprentices many who want to learn the art. They get paid while they learn and he wishes them well and supports them as they leave.
He had a horrible accident when quite young but didn't let that get him down.
He is an inspiration.

It is quite common for people who do not know the whole story to make comments like.......he doesn't make his pieces...

It is true that he doesn't phyically make his pieces...he can't! yet he continues to create and teach others...He is one of my all time favorite people. But it is true he doesn't actually create his pieces due to his handicap. But glass has been his life. He knows glass and shares his knowledge with others...

It is kind of like being president...you don't actually rule the country...you memorize speeches and do what your advisors tell you to do...and then sweat like Heck over debates ...it is hard to memorize all your answers and what if they ask you something you can't remember the canned answer to...yikes! you might put your foot in your mouth!

I guess that is what makes the world go round...differences of opinions! I have a lot of pictures...but I think i just backed them up onto CD's so will have to find them!

Sarica
09-27-2004, 11:12 AM
I have a whole bunch of pictures from his Las Vegas exibit. Let me find them and post them.

bolimasa
09-27-2004, 11:23 AM
What is the story on his handicap? Does he do any of the glass work? I guess I thought that he did some of it. While I agree that I'd love to see his apprentices get more credit, he is the one with the vision. Isn't it true that Chihuly and other glass workers acknowledge the fact that glass blowing really is a team endevour? But the one who "orchestrates" the team is credited with being the artist? I think his installations are marvellous. I think his groupings and displays and lighting are really what makes his work!

I feel it is a shame when people discredit chihuly and his contribution as well as his art. He apprentices many who want to learn the art. They get paid while they learn and he wishes them well and supports them as they leave.
He had a horrible accident when quite young but didn't let that get him down.
He is an inspiration.

It is quite common for people who do not know the whole story to make comments like.......he doesn't make his pieces...

It is true that he doesn't phyically make his pieces...he can't! yet he continues to create and teach others...He is one of my all time favorite people. But it is true he doesn't actually create his pieces due to his handicap. But glass has been his life. He knows glass and shares his knowledge with others...

It is kind of like being president...you don't actually rule the country...you memorize speeches and do what your advisors tell you to do...and then sweat like Heck over debates ...it is hard to memorize all your answers and what if they ask you something you can't remember the canned answer to...yikes! you might put your foot in your mouth!

I guess that is what makes the world go round...differences of opinions! I have a lot of pictures...but I think i just backed them up onto CD's so will have to find them!

Peg
09-27-2004, 11:24 AM
I am sorry Ingridth I totaly disagree with you and I know he is favorite of yours (I have been to Tacoma to the museum and seen his work, etc.). The skill of the glassblowers who do his work should get more credit. They are tremendously gifted. We all learn from others, but it takes skill to apply what we have learned. Frank Loyd Wright was the beginning of a change in artchitecture, but does that mean that all those who followed using or improving on his ideas should not get credit, also? PS, Did you see the whole film shown on TV showing all including his trip to Italy etc.? I think it is an eye opener. Peg M

Nonie
09-27-2004, 11:24 AM
Oooh it's just too amazing for words! I have a photo of his work as my background on my computer screen. I suppose the closest I'll ever get to a real piece ..LOL
You must of had a total blast looking at all that wonder! Thanks for sharing it with us.

encantado
09-27-2004, 11:41 AM
Wow Harriet, thanks for sharing your pictures. Some of those pieces are so huge! I bet it was an awesome experience, all that glass in one place! I loved the globes in the pond!

nicker
09-27-2004, 12:05 PM
I love his work and would give my eye teeth for a piece. Someday maybe? :confused: I know he doesn't do his own glasswork but to teach is an amazing talent not everyone can or will.

Beth Myers
09-27-2004, 12:42 PM
Knowledge is power!
Expand your mind and be open to new things. :D

Dale Chihuly's site:
http://www.chihuly.com/

And a short bio:

"Dale Chihuly is most frequently lauded for revolutionizing the Studio Glass movement, by expanding its original premise of the solitary artist working in a studio environment to encompass the notion of collaborative teams and a division of labor within the creative process. However, Chihuly's contribution extends well beyond the boundaries of both this movement and even the field of glass: his achievements have influenced contemporary art in general. Chihuly's practice of using teams has led to the development of complex, multipart sculptures of dramatic beauty that place him in the leadership role of moving blown glass out of the confines of the small, precious object and into the realm of large-scale contemporary sculpture. In fact, Chihuly deserves credit for establishing the blown-glass form as an accepted vehicle for installation and environmental art, beginning in the late twentieth century and continuing today.
A prodigiously prolific artist whose work balances content with an investigation of the material's properties of translucency and transparency, Chihuly began working with glass at a time when reverence for the medium and for technique was paramount. A student of interior design and architecture in the early 1960s, by 1965 he had become captivated by the process of glassblowing. He enrolled in the University of Wisconsin's hot glass program, the first of its kind in the United States, established by Studio Glass movement founder Harvey K. Littleton. After receiving a degree in sculpture, Chihuly was admitted to the ceramics program at the Rhode Island School of Design, only to establish its renowned glass program, turning out a generation of recognized artists."

When you visit the site, please click on the "drawing" section, amazing process. If you've worked in a hot shop or any hot glass studio, you know the energy created by team work.

A big fan, ;)
Beth

boheme'
09-27-2004, 12:54 PM
Stunning - thanks for the pictures. And Beth thanks for the link. All I can say is WOW!!! What fabulous artistry and creativity not to mention the colors. Don't you just love glass. :D

Deb

Sarica
09-27-2004, 12:55 PM
Here are some pictures of the Las Vegas exhibit.

Sarica
09-27-2004, 12:56 PM

Sarica
09-27-2004, 12:58 PM
and some more.....

Sarica
09-27-2004, 01:00 PM
almost done...

BabsW
09-27-2004, 01:01 PM
Harriet,

Those sculptures (?) are just fantastic. It must have been really exciting to see.

Barbara

Sarica
09-27-2004, 01:01 PM
ok, this is the last of them....I promise!!

nicker
09-27-2004, 01:06 PM
WOW those pics are awsome. Is the Vegas exhibit a permanent one? We go there for NFR every year I'd love to see it in person.

Sarica
09-27-2004, 01:16 PM
I believe it is. The exhibit is located in the Bellagio, it is breathtaking to see it in person! The very first picture is of the ceiling as you walk into the hotel, they told us that each piece is $10,000 and there are something like 1500-2000 pieces up there. That's 1.5-2 million bucks worth.

Beth Myers
09-27-2004, 01:33 PM
Stunning - thanks for the pictures. And Beth thanks for the link. All I can say is WOW!!! What fabulous artistry and creativity not to mention the colors. Don't you just love glass. :D

Deb

Deb,
I do LOVE glass, makes me weak.
Sarah, THANK YOU for the porn, I'm in heaven...........too bad I have to take photos of MY work today.....lol...........BUT, it does give me hope and something great to keep working toward when I see this level of work.
Go make great stuff people!!!! :evil:
Beth

nicker
09-27-2004, 01:44 PM
OH BOY! We were going to skip the NFR this year but maybe we'll have to go. That is just gorgeous!

semiabstract
09-27-2004, 02:39 PM
I got to see an exhibit of his in 96 (or so, forgot the year) at the St. Louis Art Museum.
I think I spent 2 hours in there, possibly more I couldnt quit staring and absorbing all the movement and color, not quite grasping how it all could be captured in solid glass.

My sister came in to get me at about 1 hour after I went in, we were supposed to "get a move on", but an hour or so later we finally emerged. Her hubby taking care of 2 kiddo's in a museum where you couldnt touch anything....was not happy with us :mad: . LOL!!

He has since forgiven me. I keep his wife and their 4 teenage-grown daughters in affordable jewelry for bday, x mas, and "I was an oaf...sorry" (him, not me) presents. :angel:

I had pictures, but they all got destroyed in garage fire at my mom's house. :crying:

dogsrlove
09-27-2004, 02:45 PM
Just plain GORGEOUS! Thanks for all the pictures!

Chihuly trivia- if you are a fan of "Fraser", to the right of Frasers fireplace, on a sidetable, sits a Chihuly bowl. I keep hoping for a closeup. . .

Vanessa

Toni Lutman
09-27-2004, 03:29 PM
In March, I visited relatives in Maryland, and there was a Chihuly exhibit at the Reading Public Museum in Pennsylvania. Beautiful.

Here are a few pictures.

Toni

Toni Lutman
09-27-2004, 03:30 PM
Here are a few more.

Toni

Rose Leslie
09-27-2004, 04:14 PM
In the Beach Museum wehave one of his pieces. It is a hanging wheat piece that is over eight feet long. It is in sections and really amazing to see. It has to be lowered to clean. Also a small bowl that is next to the wheat that is there. Really that is in Manhattan Kansas. The Museum in on the Kansas State University grounds. There were some chemists that would blow glass. Not giving a class in it though. Just something he did to relax. The professor moved to another county to teach at a state institution of higher learning.
Wish they were still here. I would go and see them work. :clap: :clap:

blochow2001
09-27-2004, 04:56 PM
While in Atlanta this weekend my son took me to see a Chihuly exhiit that was in the botanical gardens there. Here are a couple of pictures. It was beautiful !!!!! Anyone else got any Chihuly pictures????
Harriet

I think the Muskegon Museum of Art (MI) has a few Chihuly peices in their permanant collection. The Museum has a glass exhibit every year, in the Spring I think but I'm ont too sure. An awesome artist and visionary, in my opinion.

Beth Myers
09-27-2004, 06:12 PM
An awesome artist and visionary, in my opinion.

Visionary is the word!
Thanks,
Beth

Vangie
09-27-2004, 07:28 PM
I am sitting here in awe because I was just reading through the WC threads, (like I do everyday), and cant believe you all are discussing Chihuly. I will be visting the Habatat Galleries in Chicago in a couple of weeks to see Chihuly's work. It is amazing how we are all on the same wave length!

Blessings,
Vangie
:clap:

!ngridh
09-27-2004, 08:26 PM
Chihuly's accident was in the 60's ...he was a young man and had gone to the UK on vacation...he was flying as a passenger in a small plane that crashed. He recouperated with his friend there for a long time. A LONG TIME!
He was critically injured. The loss of the eye meant no depth perception so He could not continue blowing himself.

He didn't give up...he came back to pilchuck (sp) I think that is right...and there he started forming teams...he is held in high esteem by his teams...he supports the young assistents who go out on their own to create what they have learned... Those assistants go on to become leaders of groups too...most glass blowers today...have a team and the leader is not the blower...

emmytr1
09-27-2004, 10:00 PM
Wow, I am so exceited, I'm going to Atlanta the last week in Oct and it's still going to be there. I have to see it. Is there any other glass things I should visit while I'm there?? I can't wait to go to the gardens there is nothing I like more than beautiful gardens and glass. Thanks for sharing.

Mary Lou

Galadriel
09-27-2004, 10:01 PM
Wow! What beautiful art work!! I was not familiar with Chihuly and am SO glad that you posted the links. I hope I get to go to Atlanta and see the exhibits before they leave.

Renee

Peg
09-27-2004, 10:22 PM
True not all leaders do the blowing, but the point has been missed. Tell me where in any of the posts there has been credit given to the others personally in the team. Do you ever see much about them or their names etc.and they make it possible for the great art. A good leader gives credit to their team not onlyto them in person but are usually mentioned in write-ups by name as well as the leader. That is why people think he has made (blown) the glass himself. Their skill to complete the pieces is to be admired. Too bad people have not seen the video I saw as it gives more understanding. Peg M

Moth
09-27-2004, 10:35 PM
I saw the video and I still love Chihuly.

I believe the people on his team are paying dues. That is what you do. Pay dues until you have your own name. They are not indentured servants. Could leave anytime they want. They choose to stay for a reason.

I think Chihuly is probably a jerk in person, but I only say that because most successful artists have a touch of arrogance that can come off that way. He probably works his team hard and is overly demanding. But they still stick. Why do they stay if working with Chihuly is so unrewarding??

I totally agree that there is some deep, profound talent in the people who work on these installations and it would be awesome to know who they all are and for them to get the kudos they deserve. But let's face it, they are carving their own niche, waiting for their break, whatever you want to call it.

George Lucas wrote and directed Star Wars...do you know the names of all the people on the crew? I really don't see the difference. George Lucas still gets all the credit, but you can bet that the people who put Star Wars on their resumes got further along than they could have without it. Harrison Ford was a carpenter before Star Wars!

OK, maybe that is a bad comparison, but hopefully I got my point across.

~~Mary

--who previously thought that Chihuly's accident was a car accident, not a plane crash. Does anybody really know??

Beth Myers
09-27-2004, 10:38 PM
True not all leaders do the blowing, but the point has been missed. Tell me where in any of the posts there has been credit given to the others personally in the team. Do you ever see much about them or their names etc.and they make it possible for the great art. A good leader gives credit to their team not onlyto them in person but are usually mentioned in write-ups by name as well as the leader. That is why people think he has made (blown) the glass himself. Their skill to complete the pieces is to be admired. Too bad people have not seen the video I saw as it gives more understanding. Peg M


Peg,
I have seen the documentary you are talking about several times over the summer. I found Chihuly to be very generous with praise and acknowledgment of his team. The film's commentary also made a point of talking about the team efforts and spent a great deal of time showing the collabortation of all involved. Let me refer you back to my post from Dale's site.
"Dale Chihuly is most frequently lauded for revolutionizing the Studio Glass movement, by expanding its original premise of the solitary artist working in a studio environment to encompass the notion of collaborative teams and a division of labor within the creative process."
I have a very clear understanding of this Artist and his process, and I have to disagree with you.
Beth

Beth Myers
09-27-2004, 10:45 PM
I think Chihuly is probably a jerk in person, but I only say that because most successful artists have a touch of arrogance that can come off that way.
~~Mary



What?
Tell me you are kidding! :confused:
Beth

Moth
09-27-2004, 11:10 PM
What?
Tell me you are kidding! :confused:
Beth


No, I'm not kidding. But it isn't as bad as it sounds. And probably I should have said 'commercially successful' instead of just successful. I didn't mean it in a bad way, I totally respect the guy! I just think that the confidence someone can get from being successful can come off poorly to people who don't see the whole picture. Sometimes it can appear that (even in the video) that Chihuly can be short with people. He wants things 'his way'. There is nothing wrong with that, after all, it is HIS vision.

One example that sticks in my mind, is someone attempting to talk him out of floating all the glass down the river and taking it by boat instead and placing it where it was to be. He didn't want that...and he says exactly why. But for just a split second, there is a glimmer of a look on that person's face that they totally disagreed, but knew better than to press it. THAT is the sentiment I am trying to express. Confidence mixed with a dash of arrogance and unbending loyalty to the project. This can be hard to work under I would imagine.

I also remember a touch of friction between Chihuly and someone on the team, but I don't recall the specifics enough to delve into that one. This happens any time you get a bunch of people together that all have a passion that wants to take them in a certain direction, if the path they are taking isn't the one they want to take. Even after this bit of friction, I remember Chihuly praising the team member to the camera.

I don't think it is fair to think we know who someone is, or what they are about based on our limited scope. All I have to go on is the one video that I saw, posts from people here on this site, and my own meanderings through the internet and library.

I happen to disagree with Peg, but I don't claim to be an insider either. I just made a call with the information I had and I haven't heard anything yet to change my opinion.

~~Mary

Moth
09-27-2004, 11:17 PM
I forgot to mention before that Jeremy Bizzano has some really awesome pictures of a Chihuly exhibit in his GlassArtists.org gallery. He has a real talent with a camera! :wave: Hi Jeremy...how are you healing??



Also, my favorite part of the video is when they are in the glass-cutting part of the factory and the man who had been working there his whole life had gotten to make something creative and unique instead of making the same cuts over and over again. He had to break out of his own mold to do it and he just looked so happy!! :clap:

~~Mary

Beth Myers
09-27-2004, 11:23 PM
Moth,
Of course, neither you nor Peg need me to say you have a right to any opinion you choose.
I was amazed by your sweeping and detrimental character judgement about someone you don't know, and based on such limited knowledge.
And in your ideas of "successful artists".
Now I know,
Beth

nicker
09-27-2004, 11:32 PM
I think it's important to remeber someone has to teach. Without them none of use would be making anything. Regardless of his personality, he passes his gidt onto others, something I commend anyone for. :clap:

!ngridh
09-28-2004, 12:18 AM
You know...to learn from a master and get paid for it!!!!! is fantastic...I would jump at the chance...well if I were younger...and in better shape and....and...
etc...did I mention younger...?

Moth
09-28-2004, 12:21 AM
Moth,
Of course, neither you nor Peg need me to say you have a right to any opinion you choose.
I was amazed by your sweeping and detrimental character judgement about someone you don't know, and based on such limited knowledge.
And in your ideas of "successful artists".
Now I know,
Beth

It was sweeping, and I apologize for that. I was wrong to say it. I was making a comment on one person and made it sound like it was about every artist that ever walked the face of the earth, which of course is cowpie.

I was just trying to say that I understand how people can come to the conclusions that Peg has pointed out. We only have small windows into who people are and depending on how you interpret those glimpses...it can color your opinion of anyone. That is why I was so up front about where my opinions came from. I DON'T know him, but I know of him, and I really do like him. I don't know as much about him as you do, but I read and watched everything I could find.

My last post was meant to explain that I don't think Chihuly IS a jerk...just that he can come off that way sometimes...but I think I failed miserably. I don't think that what I described is a character flaw. I don't see anything wrong with him having a vision and wanting to stick to it. I also think that anyone with his responsibilities and deadlines and everything being on such a grand scale has to be under a tremendous amount of pressure. I can't say that I wouldn't get short with people sometimes. Hence, "commercially successful" (ie. lots of people depend on what he does) as opposed to "successful". Hell, if anyone were to ask me (but they haven't), I would say that I am a 'successful' artist, and I don't think I am usually a jerk. :(

Am I wrong about people like Madonna (an artist I think of as commercially successful) running a tight ship, my way or the highway kind of operation? How 'bout Marth Stewart (kind of an artist, right? :rolleyes: ).

As I am writing this, for every person like those two that I think of, I think of more that aren't (or weren't) like that at all. Celine Dion instantly came to mind first (for some reason I am in a music artist track).

So I do give a huge apology for making that statement that I said in my first post. I was just lumping Chihuly in with stereotypes of Madonna et al. and that was inappropriate and inaccurate.

I will say though, that even if Chihuly IS like that, it doesn't make him any less of a genius, teacher or visionary, whatever whoever wants to call him.

~~Mary

Peg
09-28-2004, 09:33 AM
No excuse for bad manners. Thank heavins the instructors in our field are generous with praise for their students and proud of them. I do not see them taking all the credit for themselves. Sorry people, fame or talent is not an excuse. Think some of you need to meet him and see a little more what he is like. Again tell me why when you see write-ups all you usually see is his name. How many posts even here mention a name of a person in his crew? I don't care if you think it is their dues to not be more appreciated and recognized even while in training. The master could not make it if it weren't for his team doing the actual work. Peg M

Beth Myers
09-28-2004, 10:23 AM
No excuse for bad manners. Thank heavins the instructors in our field are generous with praise for their students and proud of them. I do not see them taking all the credit for themselves. Sorry people, fame or talent is not an excuse. Think some of you need to meet him and see a little more what he is like. Again tell me why when you see write-ups all you usually see is his name. How many posts even here mention a name of a person in his crew? I don't care if you think it is their dues to not be more appreciated and recognized even while in training. The master could not make it if it weren't for his team doing the actual work. Peg M

Peg,
Do you know Dale Chihuly personally?
I'm curious about whether your opinions come from personal interaction with Dale or from just your impressions of the television program and print media.
Thanks,
Beth

kybeadmaker
09-28-2004, 11:10 AM
I am curious why Peg is so angry that Chihuly's team members do not get name recognition? If it weren't for Chihuly there would be no team. Members of this team were not hog tied and made to work. They chose to be a part of it for their own reasons, which I am sure are varied. I have never read anything about any of his team members complaining, yet we have a person right here on WC complaining for them. Strange.

Peg
09-28-2004, 12:00 PM
I am not angry, you are mistaken. When I first posted it was that I felt his team should get some credit and then everyone missed the point. A master is only as good as his team is able to produce. I gave an honest opinion. You can take it where you want, and it is just how I feel and would like them to get some credit, also. I feel I do not have to keep defending this anymore and will bow out. (PS. In for our women's yearly check-up yesterday and was talking to my diagnose physician a highly intelligent woman, as she is into art and she feels the same way as I do so I am not alone in wishing the some credit could also be given to his team in doing their wonderful part). Peg M

Beth Myers
09-28-2004, 12:23 PM
Peg,
No one missed the point.
Beth

collectiblesbyrose
09-28-2004, 10:32 PM
Don't let this discussion get ugly! :(

http://www.selfadvocatenet.com/faq/im_ok.asp
He is listed near the bottom. Don't know how reliable the site is though.