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Kimberly Affleck
09-26-2004, 01:50 PM
Here are a couple inspired by Kate Fowle. Take yer class if you ever have the opportunity! Please ignore that cat hair. I have furry helpers! :cat:

koregon
09-26-2004, 01:54 PM
wow Kimberly, those are awesome!!!

MistyCherie
09-26-2004, 02:02 PM
Kaye stole the words right out of my mouth!

Kimberly, those are stunning! I especially love the long thin one. I don't know why--but that one just speaks to me. Yum Yum, keep it up!

:clap: :D :clap:

-M

Kimberly Affleck
09-26-2004, 02:02 PM
Thank you Kaye and Misty!!! :wave: :wave: :wave: I wish I could take credit for the technique, but it is all Kate Fowle's. She is really a great teacher. Basically, I took a couple of marginal beads and made them a little more special! Lots of fun, but labor intensive!

aimee
09-26-2004, 02:50 PM
Drool!!! Drool!!! Drool!!!

boheme'
09-26-2004, 02:53 PM
THUD -- those are gorgeous!

Deb Cline

Alan Cross
09-26-2004, 03:07 PM
Great workshop Kim looks like you did really good.
Alan :)

jessicah
09-26-2004, 03:10 PM
Gorgeous beads, Kimberly!! I wish my experiments turned out that good :D

Orca
09-26-2004, 03:25 PM
Very, very cool, Kimberly! Did you make your own electroforming set up? I've been toying with the idea of playing with this, but I'm a bit intimidated....I'd love to see this done in person.

AMR GlassWorks
09-26-2004, 03:31 PM
THUD!!!!! back atcha Kimberly!!!! Those are incredible!!! :clap:

Lesleyjoy
09-26-2004, 03:36 PM
Wow! Those really are amazing, Gorgeous!!!!

JoyceMI
09-26-2004, 03:44 PM
Oh! Those are awsome Kimberley! Stunning!. I like them both but the second one grabs me more. I like 'ornate' looking stuff. That is how that looks to me. I LOVE it! ..... Is that copper on there?

Kimberly Affleck
09-26-2004, 03:55 PM
Thank you all for the compliments!!! I'll try to answer the questions. Yes, I bought my own set up. Kate pretty much gives you all of the information you need in her class. I addition, the info is on her website and in Jim Kervin's book on Kate and her techniques. She is incredibly sharing with her knowledge. It is intimidating at first, but once you see it done, it is really pretty simple, but very time consuming. The copper colored metal and the dark metal on the beads is copper.
I almost forgot. The really ornate one has a piece of Cedar branch and cones glued on, the copper formed over it. So the branches and cones on the bead are real, just covered in copper. I am NOT a sculptor. Mother Nature did the sculpture, I just messed with it.

JoyceMI
09-26-2004, 04:07 PM
I almost forgot. The really ornate one has a piece of Cedar branch and cones glued on, the copper formed over it. So the branches and cones on the bead are real, just covered in copper. I am NOT a sculptor. Mother Nature did the sculpture, I just messed with it.

Thanks Kimberly. Wow that is amazing being able to work in the natural cones and branches with the metal.

So many things in this craft I would love to learn. Wish I had more time and $$$.

justdeb
09-26-2004, 04:34 PM
Those are totally awesome Kimberly. I love the texture of the cedar. Wondering if I could do something similar with PMC?

nicker
09-26-2004, 04:48 PM
WOW

Kim those are absolutely lovely. I like the second best!

toozygoot
09-26-2004, 04:58 PM
Kimberly! I'm speechless! :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

pat

jbriz
09-26-2004, 06:40 PM
Incredible work! You should be VERY proud!!! The bead itself is gorgeous and then what you did to it....stunning!

Trishki
09-26-2004, 07:39 PM
Wow, those are awsome! I really like them both, but the long one speaks to me just a bit extra. :clap: :clap:
When you say time consuming/labor intensive - what is a timeframe from start to finish (after the actual glass bead is made)?

Lara
09-26-2004, 08:04 PM
I've seen both of these in person and they are just wonderful. Glad to see you sharing them here Kim.

Lara

:wave:

Sassyglassgal
09-26-2004, 09:19 PM
Well I will gladly jump on the "THUD" wagon on these two beads. They are amazing and nothing less than I expect from you girl. Keep stepping outside your box and as you see...you are soaring. :wink2:

dread
09-26-2004, 10:34 PM
O wowzers - I love them - been dieing to learn that Kate Fowle technique! Where can you buy the equipment and the electroforming paint?

Kimberly Affleck
09-27-2004, 03:05 AM
Wow, those are awsome! I really like them both, but the long one speaks to me just a bit extra. :clap: :clap:
When you say time consuming/labor intensive - what is a timeframe from start to finish (after the actual glass bead is made)?

They varied, anywhere from 4 to 10 hours. The bigger one took longer. Also, that doesn't include the time it took to paint them and clean them up, so add another couple of hours each.

Kimberly Affleck
09-27-2004, 03:06 AM
O wowzers - I love them - been dieing to learn that Kate Fowle technique! Where can you buy the equipment and the electroforming paint?

You can get all of the equipment from Rio Grande. But, the best thing to do is to take her class and see it done. Makes it MUCH simpler than trying to wade through the technical stuff. PLUS, you get to see so many more techniques! Kate Rocks!!!

isle-of-cats
09-27-2004, 03:17 AM
ooooOOOOOooooooOOOOOO Kimberly!!
I would love to see those in person sometime...
and maybe in my pocket! :p ;) :D
They are Beautiful!

nursekatie
09-27-2004, 05:34 AM
Oh wow Lady.................you are incredible..........those beads are incredible!!! 3 Cheers to Kate also for being so good at teaching!!! :clap:

tulips
09-27-2004, 10:13 AM
Marginal beads, huh? LOL.....Those are fantastic, even before all the copper! After the copper is pretty cool too! I really like the second one! Someday I hope to take Kate's class!

sadiesjewels
09-27-2004, 12:15 PM
After seeing those amazing beads, and having a long term yearning for electroforming ... I just have to take her class!!!

must sell more .... must sell more ... must sell more ...

smile

sadie

You did a really great job on those Kimberly - I am in awe!

Virginia L.
09-27-2004, 12:24 PM
Thud, WOW, incredible, etc., etc., etc., there are not enough exclaimation points for those!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! - Really wonderful technique - I am so glad Kate is so generouse - they fit your beads so well. I too am kinda yerning for that top one!!! - God Bless - Virginia

Laura Brito
09-27-2004, 12:55 PM
Wow Kimberly! I find those beads especially SPECIAL! hehe, they are just too lovely. No words can give them the praise or you the praise you deserve.

Just Gorgeous!

!ngridh
09-27-2004, 08:31 PM
OH my god!!! those are just gorgeous...and I know how much work they are...really lovely Kimberly!

AlaskaBarb
09-28-2004, 05:18 AM
Love them, especially the juniper texture! Great job! Did you have to move it around a lot while electroforming? I think I read that Kate rinses the bead off, repaints it, dries it and then puts it back in the bath, to make sure it coats evenly. Did you?

-----

There's just so many things to be explored with those, if you get the right rectifier. I wanted the one that can do really thick pieces, but it was about 1500.00. Those you can actually make a wax positive, electroform them, then melt the wax out and have a piece of jewelry. The less expensive ones will do thin stuff well, but the coating is brittle and crumbly or something if it gets too thick.


I keep looking, longingly, at the digital electroformer, but the instructions were written by somebody with a pocket protector and an electrical engineering degree -- I'm afraid I'll fry the darned thing when I turn it on.
To me, they all seem like glorified battery chargers, but I guess the volt/amp/filtration is the key.

Your beads are going to make me get up off my rump and try it out. Thanks!

B

Kimberly Affleck
09-28-2004, 11:09 AM
Love them, especially the juniper texture! Great job! Did you have to move it around a lot while electroforming? I think I read that Kate rinses the bead off, repaints it, dries it and then puts it back in the bath, to make sure it coats evenly. Did you?

-----

There's just so many things to be explored with those, if you get the right rectifier. I wanted the one that can do really thick pieces, but it was about 1500.00. Those you can actually make a wax positive, electroform them, then melt the wax out and have a piece of jewelry. The less expensive ones will do thin stuff well, but the coating is brittle and crumbly or something if it gets too thick.


I keep looking, longingly, at the digital electroformer, but the instructions were written by somebody with a pocket protector and an electrical engineering degree -- I'm afraid I'll fry the darned thing when I turn it on.
To me, they all seem like glorified battery chargers, but I guess the volt/amp/filtration is the key.

Your beads are going to make me get up off my rump and try it out. Thanks!

B

I did a lot of turning and rinsing, but didn't need to repaint, fortunately. These were sort of experiments to see if I could actually do this, so I wans't too concerned with the thickness. They seemed to have a fairly even deposition of copper.

I purchased a digital rectifier from Rio Grande. Seems to work pretty well for this particular application. :D

AlaskaBarb
09-28-2004, 01:48 PM
Thanks, Kim. Your results were excellent.

I re-read my post and sounded like I said Kate's type of rectifier would end up with crumbly results -- LOL. Of course, that's not what I meant. The thinner coating works perfectly. What the guy at Shor International was telling me was that when jewelers do thick electroforming, they need a special rectifier that has extremely low voltage and fine filtration, for a stronger deposition, since there's nothing underneath, like a bead, to enhance the strength, just a wax model that is burned out. The coating stays even, for replicating the wax piece, rather than getting that interesting organic, bubbly effect on the ridges.


I don't know if you'd be interested, but it seems like electroforming also opens the door for making custom end caps, clasps and other things which might be useful to us.

For instance -- even if you're not that interested in making finished jewelery, I could see you making some spacers just using the juniper texture, to sell as a set -- that is, glueing the juniper scales onto a plastic bead and then electroforming the whole deal, for a durable, but lightweight set of spacers that match your focal.

Just an idea. Thanks for showing your new work!

Barb Caraway

Kimberly Affleck
09-28-2004, 02:06 PM
I don't know if you'd be interested, but it seems like electroforming also opens the door for making custom end caps, clasps and other things which might be useful to us.

For instance -- even if you're not that interested in making finished jewelery, I could see you making some spacers just using the juniper texture, to sell as a set -- that is, glueing the juniper scales onto a plastic bead and then electroforming the whole deal, for a durable, but lightweight set of spacers that match your focal.

Barb Caraway

LOL!! Great Minds.......I have been thinking exactly the same thing and have some other ideas rolling around (lots of room to roll in this empty old head). I just wish there were about 10 more hours in each day so I could get everthing done that I envision! Never seems to work!!
Kimberly

AlaskaBarb
09-28-2004, 04:35 PM
LOL!! Great Minds.......I have been thinking exactly the same thing and have some other ideas rolling around (lots of room to roll in this empty old head). I just wish there were about 10 more hours in each day so I could get everthing done that I envision! Never seems to work!!
Kimberly

Ha! Tell me about it. I'm doing some necklaces for a show, and -- well, let's just say I'm finding it difficult to drag myself away from the torch to string these things up. Not my forte, for sure. I'd rather be melting!

But I definitely see the need for customizing the whole piece (if one is making finished jewelry) instead of buying ready-made spacers and claps. Just think of it as the next step in your creative advancement -- it's probably important to be literate with the medium, even if you don't avail yourself of the opportunity. Just gives one more flexibility and choices.

But the time thing, that's rough. I envision being able to electroform while I'm torching and annealing, checking it every now and then, during breaks. Don't know if it would actually work like that. :p Might take more babysitting, but it would seem there's some efficient way to manage both.

Post pics of your spacers when you get 'em done. They'll be fab!

B