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meowmeow
09-23-2004, 07:32 PM
Did this yesterday morning...then ended up sitting in the ER for 2 hours to get some meds for another UTI. Blech...getting old sucks!
Anyhow, this is light blue art spectrum, 1/4 sheet. It is the view I have been looking at down the street and finally had the light right at the right time and set up and worked for an hour or so...then a bit more at home to finish it off.
Lousy photo, but I can't seem to get a better one of this.
C&C welcome, although I probably wont' do more.
Thanks!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/23-Sep-2004/15050-P1010001.JPG

Sandy

edited because I put the wrong picture in. doh!
And now that I can see it up here...the background behind the trees is forest...and is much darker in the painting...for some reason a lot of light is showing up here and really makes the whole thing look wrong.

khourianya
09-23-2004, 08:16 PM
I think it looks lovely. Thank you for sharing...and I hope you're feeling better.

prestonsega
09-24-2004, 03:40 AM
I was thinking today the same thing about getting old,,,,the bones don't move as good as they used to.

"C&C welcome, although I probably wont' do more."

I am that way too...I like the feedback and use it for future works....the problem now is I can only say how much I like it and wouldn't know how to improve it. ;)

E-J
09-24-2004, 08:30 AM
Sandy, this is really nice and the touches of red add zing.

As for growing old, I guess the older we get, the more we also continue to evolve and develop as artists ... a small consolation, perhaps :)

meowmeow
09-24-2004, 08:38 AM
Thanks everyone!

As to growing old, if nothing else, it sure beats the alternative! :D

Khadres
09-24-2004, 12:50 PM
Really like this one, too! You've really advanced in your plein air work! I'm envious!

meowmeow
09-24-2004, 01:25 PM
Thanks Sooz! I have to say that although they are not always successful, on the whole I am pretty pleased with my progress too. They say you need to do at least 100 and although I have not counted I would not be surprised if I am around there. Those first few were so hard and so bad...well, not a bad experience but definitely not anything I would ocnsider framing.
I know a year or so ago I would never have been able to look at this scene and come up with this painting. It makes me feel pretty good.
Oh...oh...I think I am headed for a disaster! :D Now, why am I afraid to say I am doing alright! :rolleyes:
Thanks...don't be envious...get out there and do it. Besides, there are plenty I don't bother posting because they were good experiences but lousy paintings. :D

Sandy

Khadres
09-24-2004, 01:31 PM
That's something I can't seem to get a handle on...the way you pick a scene and LIMIT it to painting size! I'm always overwhelmed by the vastness of the vista...guess I need a viewfinder, eh?

meowmeow
09-24-2004, 02:00 PM
A viewfinder is really helpful...even if it is just a piece of paper with a rectangle cut out of it. YOu can even hold your hands up and look through your fingers.
And then doing a little thumbnail. The thumbnail is crucial for me. I just do a real rough thing with charcoal pencil but I get some of the values and the main composition. I can see if there are serious issues, like a tree right in the middle. Then I use that to sketch quickly onto my paper before I start to paint.
All stuff I learned here! :D I mean I knew about those things but did not understand the importance. They really work.

s.

DominicM
09-24-2004, 06:03 PM
Sandy, this is a nice plein aire - sorry to hear of tripo to ER, hope you are feeing better now

Khadres
09-24-2004, 06:26 PM
I agree about the thumbnails! They definitely pay off for the little bit of time spent! They're also a real treasure if, for some reason, you don't get to do the whole painting right away...combine 'em with digipics of the area and you've got a GREAT way of bringing the scene back to life in your studio later! Actually, I think that's the first thing I'm going to do with my new mat cutter...cut myself an expandable viewfinder to take along wherever I go. I also read a thing somewhere about a guy that actually uses his camera as a viewfinder, snapping a pic when he finds just what he wants compositionally...seems to me both together would be the best of both worlds!

Mikki Petersen
09-24-2004, 08:50 PM
Wow, Sandy! This is a great painting as posted and probably a knock out IRL. I defintely see a lot of growth in your work from a year ago. A good message to the timid to just jump in and DO IT. The more we work the stronger our work becomes. Good for you!

sundiver
09-26-2004, 09:54 AM
Thanks Sooz! I have to say that although they are not always successful, on the whole I am pretty pleased with my progress too. They say you need to do at least 100 and although I have not counted I would not be surprised if I am around there. Those first few were so hard and so bad...well, not a bad experience but definitely not anything I would ocnsider framing.
I know a year or so ago I would never have been able to look at this scene and come up with this painting. It makes me feel pretty good.
Oh...oh...I think I am headed for a disaster! :D Now, why am I afraid to say I am doing alright! :rolleyes:
Thanks...don't be envious...get out there and do it. Besides, there are plenty I don't bother posting because they were good experiences but lousy paintings. :D

Sandy

Nice one, Sandy! It has that fresh right-there look .
I'm at around the 100-mark with plein airs, too, and still turn out my share of stinkers, but they are well worth the effort, aren't they?

ExpressiveAngie
09-26-2004, 12:02 PM
I love the way you did the dense background but still managed to keep it pushed back.

meowmeow
09-26-2004, 01:01 PM
THanks Mikki, Wendy and Angie.

Yes, they are all worth it...although I have to say that sometimes when I am in the throes of a particular mess I don't feel that way! :D But you always learn something.
I didn't ever actually count how many I have done but I know it is a few. ANd it realy did take a while till I produced anything I didn't want to immediately hide. And yep...some I still do hide! :D

Thanks Angie...you really can't even see the background that well in this photo. It was the depth and the "layers" that intruiged me. I hoped I was able to show that so your comment made me feel good.

prestonsega
09-26-2004, 01:10 PM
whew!! Wendy and Sandy ...I can't fathom painting 100 plein airs.....Seems that to be successful at doing that, one would need to be predisposed to the out of doors. Do ya'll find that to be true in your cases?

meowmeow
09-26-2004, 01:59 PM
I think it is definitely harder in the north to do a lot of these but there doesn't have to be a time limit. And I don't think it has to be exactly 100...just that doing a "few" isn't necessarily going to make you a lot more adept at it.
I was out with a friend the other day and she was complaining that she keeps doing them and they are still hard...she said she had already done a lot and I asked how many and she said about 20....well obviously that isn't enough, at least for her.
It has taken me about 2 years and I do them mostly in the summer....I have done a few little ones from the window in the winter. And some a real simple...I don't spend hours outside. I am not an outdoorsy person at all. In fact it is probably one reason it took me so long to get "set up"...in terms of realizing I Really do need suntan lotion, bug spray, a hat, a sweatband, etc. ANd I need to be very flexible in terms of how I set up when I paint. SOmetimes I use the easel...sometimes I just sit on a rock with a board on my lap. SOmetimes I am out for 3 or 4 hours but usually an hour or so, maybe 2 hours tops.
And...maybe I haven't done 100 yet. But I know I've done more than 20! And some are still lousy!
And although I recommend doing it, I also would say that if you really don't enjoy doing it, then you shouldn't. If you are not enjoying it, no matter how hard you work at it you probably won't succeed and even if you do, so what...you should be having fun. Everyone is different.