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jbitzel
09-21-2004, 02:10 PM
I wanted to know if anybody knows where I can get a diagram of a color wheel. I don't need a physical tool, just a chart or a graph so I get an idea how to make colors like brown and rust. Not these in particular but I would like to be able to look up a clor and see how to mix it.

Einion
09-21-2004, 02:59 PM
This is actually more difficult than you'd expect from thinking about the general idea. Most colour wheels for the artist are basic tools for placing colours in approximations of their positions relative to each other and are not ideally suited to predicting colour mixes unfortunately.

Browns are basically dark-valued yellows (Raw Umber and Raw Sienna for example), oranges (Burnt Sienna for example) and orange-reds (Burnt Umber for example) so adding a close complements to orange-yellows, oranges and orange-red paints can give you these sorts of colours as a simple guide. If you're using Windows, Paint has a custom colour picker that you can use to explore basic colour ideas like this although it's a lot easier in PSP or Photoshop.

Einion

SummerSun
09-21-2004, 03:12 PM
I'm not sure if this is at all helpful, but I googled with the word "color wheel" and this was the first link on the list: http://www.color-wheel-pro.com/ . There seems to be a free trial version - maybe it helps? :)

Lady Carol
09-21-2004, 03:13 PM
There is the virtual palette in the Tools bar. That with a bit of experimenting will help you determine what to mix to get a colour

rickymanchester
09-21-2004, 04:35 PM
There is the virtual palette in the Tools bar. That with a bit of experimenting will help you determine what to mix to get a colour

I'd never even noticed the Wetcanvas! virtual palette but what a great tool! Now I can sit and mix until my heart is content all without wasting any of my paint at all. :clap:

Cheers

CazM
09-21-2004, 04:43 PM
Just done a bit of searching and found this site. Looks rather complicated but very interesting! Gonna have to read up and figure it out. I love finding things like this! :clap:

http://www.mauigateway.com/~donjusko/tubecolors.htm

Richard Saylor
09-21-2004, 05:36 PM
James, I've had the most luck with Bruce MacEvoy's color wheel (http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/wheel.html). However, like all color wheels, it is inexact for mixing, in the sense that mixtures of two colors do not necessarily lie on the straight line segment joining the colors. It is, however, an excellent guide when used intelligently. You really should read his discussion of color wheel mixing (http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/color5.html) before trying to use it. A nice feature of his wheel is that it uses the CI pigment names.

Richard

Richard Saylor
09-21-2004, 06:04 PM
Just done a bit of searching and found this site. Looks rather complicated but very interesting! Gonna have to read up and figure it out. I love finding things like this! :clap:

http://www.mauigateway.com/~donjusko/tubecolors.htm
Don seems to have put an enormous amount of work into the development of his color wheel, but you should keep in mind that the Don Jusko version of color theory is not exactly mainstream. :rolleyes: In fact, it is highly idiosyncratic and controversial.

CazM
09-21-2004, 07:01 PM
Don seems to have put an enormous amount of work into the development of his color wheel, but you should keep in mind that the Don Jusko version of color theory is not exactly mainstream. :rolleyes: In fact, it is highly idiosyncratic and controversial.

Thanks for the warning! To be honest im not sure i really understand it! Oh well still quite interesting though.

The other links are interesting too, a great forum topic i think. :)

Lady Carol
09-21-2004, 10:53 PM
I'd never even noticed the Wetcanvas! virtual palette but what a great tool! Now I can sit and mix until my heart is content all without wasting any of my paint at all. :clap:

Cheers

Wetcanvas has a wealth of information and resources. It is just a matter of playing with the site and seeing what is available. I think you will be surprised.

Einion
09-22-2004, 07:29 AM
James, I've had the most luck with Bruce MacEvoy's color wheel (http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/wheel.html). However, like all color wheels, it is inexact for mixing, in the sense that mixtures of two colors do not necessarily lie on the straight line segment joining the colors.
Excellent point Richard, something everyone needs to know.

Mixing lines are often curved, startlingly so in some cases, so 'colour-mixing geometry' is very much not as rigid, predictable and linear as <cough> some people would have us believe :D

Don seems to have put an enormous amount of work into the development of his color wheel, but you should keep in mind that the Don Jusko version of color theory is not exactly mainstream. :rolleyes: In fact, it is highly idiosyncratic and controversial.
Well said http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Aug-2003/3842-thumbsup.gif

Don also over-emphasises the importance of transparent colours, which is fine if you want to paint transparently but most painters working in acrylics and oils prefer to use opaque colour mostly or exclusively.

Einion

jbitzel
09-22-2004, 07:56 AM
Don also over-emphasises the importance of transparent colours, which is fine if you want to paint transparently but most painters working in acrylics and oils prefer to use opaque colour mostly or exclusively.

Einion


Define opaque, I understand that most acrylists use water or medium a fair amount, making them transparent. Not to mention all the colors that are naturally not 100% opaque, like Napthol and phthalo pigments.

Einion
09-24-2004, 08:13 AM
Acrylics are relatively transparent compared to some other mediums because they can't have as high a pigment percentage and be stable. That doesn't mean they're actually transparent as some sources put it.

Colours that are naturally opaque include Titanium White, Mars Black, Red Oxide, Cadmium Red and Chromium Oxide Green. If you compare good examples of these with phthalocyanine blues and greens, transparent iron oxides and quinacridone colours for example, you'll see that acrylics can be quite reasonably opaque :)

Einion