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A Few Pigments
09-15-2004, 03:35 PM
My goal is to paint something that looks like a Bouguereau without using his methods, ie glazing, scumbling and mudding. So this will be painted in the direct method. The ARC site does not state the size of the original painting. so, I had to scale up from the digital image. It scaled up to 14Ĺ x 26ĺ inches.

Oil Palette: (subject to change if needed.)
Cad red light
Alizarin crimson
Naples yellow
Burnt umber
Prussian blue
Terre verte
Flake white

Other Materials:
Number 1, 2 and 4 round white nylon brushes.
Number 4, 6 and 8 filbert white nylon brushes.
Liquin Original.
Blood, sweat and tears.
The luck of the Irish.

The Storm by William Bouguereau, 1874.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Sep-2004/42249-1874_Bouguereau_The_Storm_500.jpg
My first go 14Ĺ x 26ĺ inches.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Sep-2004/42249-The_Storm_B_500_1.jpg
Second go
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Sep-2004/42249-The_Storm_B_500_2.jpg

Carey Griffel
09-15-2004, 05:07 PM
Great to see this in its own thread! I will be following your progress with great interest.

~!Carey

A Few Pigments
09-15-2004, 06:28 PM
Thanks Carey. I started this in August and itís taken me this long to work up the guts to post it as a WIP. I can only hope Bouguereau wonít be rolling over in his grave. :eek: :)

A Few Pigments
09-15-2004, 06:41 PM
Before I go any further with the painting Iím going to do this canvas to work out the flesh colors, vaules, tints, cloud colors and anything else I need to refine, correct or sort out. I feel if I donít get the faces absolutely right nothing else will matter.

I printed out just the two models faces, traced the lines around the value changes on tracing paper and copied it onto a canvas with graphite paper.

9 x 12 inches, graphite on canvas.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Sep-2004/42249-The_Storm_B_TEST_500_1.jpg

Mikey
09-18-2004, 04:18 PM
Hi Bruce,

I follow you on this one. I was looking at site th other day where they mentioned how much work Bourguerau put in doing preliminary sketches of faces before starting work on the canvas. I'm far too impatient.

Mikey

A Few Pigments
09-18-2004, 06:12 PM
Hi Mikey,

Iím glad youíre watching this thread, itís nice to have friends. You can tell me what Iím doing wrong. I spent 4 hours last night painting a still life with a knife and Iím not finished with it yet. I transferred the tracing to a mat board panel last night and painted for 1 hour. I decided to not use the small canvas I posted here so I can work on the same surface Iím using for the full painting. I need to work on it again tonight and then Iíll post it tomorrow. And I need to work on that landscape too. And the Yorkshire painting too. And that watercolor by Zorn, I havenít even started that yetÖI need 48 hours in a day...or 96 :)

dollardays
09-18-2004, 06:30 PM
Hi Bruce,
Just stopped in to see if you've made any progress on this. I started another Bougereau yesterday. I'm doing something similar to you, trying to get the drawing -especially the faces and their values- correct so hopefully I can concentrate on color when I lay it in.

Nora

Here's the one I am doing- but I am cropping it at the bootom of her hands:

Mikey
09-18-2004, 06:38 PM
I think it's a very good thing to copy these old masters, because we have so much to learn from them. I've never studied a painting so closely before.

Was it you who introduced me to Ron Sanders' web site, or did I just come across it through google. He gives a Bourguerau demo, although from a present day couple of subjects. It'll be interesting when you get to those flesh tones.

This is kind of opposite to his painting of the nude lounging on a rock where an obviously noisy wave is about to come crashing down on her and she doesn't care less.

Mikey

dcorc
09-18-2004, 07:22 PM
Hi Bruce - also watching with great interest - tried to find out the size of the original, without any success, alas (though I'd guess it's big).

I know the feeling of wanting more hours in the day :)

Dave

Jaysen
09-19-2004, 11:58 AM
I like the fact that your taking the time and patience to do a color study. Most artists are too impatient to stop the painting and spend a few days studying what they should do.

I know your not using the original's techniques, but do you have a link or any insight into how he painted? What was his technique?

Nevermind, just found the links Dcorc put in the oil painting forum... cheers, and good luck on this extrordinary work.

A Few Pigments
09-19-2004, 03:35 PM
Hi Jaysen,
The only link Iíve looked at so far is the one at ARC http://www.artrenewal.org/museum/b/Bouguereau_William/bio1.asp I saw the links Dave posted but I guess Iím to independent to read it all. Itís the look and feeling of this painting I want to recreate, not so much the way it was originally painted.


Hi Dave,
Jolly good to see you here old boy. Yes, there are too many paintings to do and never enough time.


Hi Mikey,
I too think itís a good idea to copy the paintings of the old masters, but really for what one can learn about composition and color harmony than anything else. I couldnít have told you about Rons site because I didnít know about it. Could you please post a link for it?


Hi Nora,
Itís good to see you here. The Bougereau you chose has much more warmth and tenderness then the one Iím doing. I guess I relate better to the coldness and turbulence in life. Good luck with your copy, Iím sure it will be excellent.

A Few Pigments
09-19-2004, 03:45 PM
I transferred the tracing to a gessoed mat board panel, so I will use the canvas I transferred the tracing to for a different painting. This will allow me to paint this test on the same surface as the surface for the finial painting.

The sky is finished in a direct method in just 2 hours. This was achieved by painting on a thin layer of the lightest value in the sky and then adding the darker values. An up and down motion of the brush allowed me to pick up and blend the darker values with the light value layer.

I used Liquin in all the layers. The finial painting is much larger so Iíll need to work without the Liquin so Iíll have enough working time to do the entire sky in one go. Iíve found this way of painting much faster than glazing but it has itís own unique demands. Glazing can be done from day to day. The direct method, the way Iím doing it, demands one finish once started. Not a good thing if you have demands that will take you away from completing the area youíve started in one go.

I mixed burnt sienna into the purssian blue to gray the clouds a bit. It looks like Iíll have to gray them more in the final painting. Iíll have to spend more time on the finial painting to make sure I get these clouds right. I had to hurry through this and thatís never a good idea.

Oil on mat board, 15x10 inches.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Sep-2004/42249-The_Storm_B_N_TEST_500_2.jpg

Yokovich
09-20-2004, 08:07 PM
to think I found this thread
through a link
from a thread
about
bob ross.

lol
will be following. It is looking damn good and I will learn about glazing :)

A Few Pigments
09-21-2004, 01:15 AM
Originally posted by celestia
will be following. It is looking damn good and I will learn about glazing
Thank you celestia, butÖ :confused: errÖumÖwhat I said about glazing I said tongue in cheek. :wink2: Actually Iím not doing any glazing on this painting. Tomorrow though Iím starting a new wip thread of a painting by Anders Zorn and that one Iíll do entirely in glazes. Youíre more than welcome to follow both threads if you want to. :)

A Few Pigments
09-25-2004, 05:12 PM
Nora had a good idea in doing just part of a painting and doing it much larger then the size i'm working on. I'm using a size 0 and a size 00 brushes. There's another hurricane heading to my town, so I'll just have to see how much more painting I can get done before it gets here.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/25-Sep-2004/42249-The_Storm_B_N_TEST_500_3.jpg

Florian
09-27-2004, 07:00 AM
Hi Bruce, Iíll follow this thread with interest. Bouguereau is one of my favourite artist and Iím going to try the next Master of the Month ďLíAmour et Psyche enfantsĒ, Iím sure we meet us there. Iím looking forward to your updates. :)

Florian

Mikey
10-01-2004, 08:07 AM
Bruce,

Is the this the right place to post Gabrielle?

Some projects are doomed to failure from the word go and this could be one of them. The artists board doesn't seem to be primed at all and my primer has dried up. My printer isn't working until I buy another cartidge and so on. I have to take this from the screen. So wwhat I'll just have fun.

I've used Terre Verte for the monochrome as a try out, rather than because it was an old master technique. I'm not going to manage Bourguerau's method yet. I haven't used a drawing, just paint straight down as usual. This means I'll correct the eyes and mouth etc, hopefully before I get to painting in the colour. Whatever, let's hope the man has something to teach me about portrait painting.

Size 14 x 18 inches board, medium oils.

Mikey

A Few Pigments
10-01-2004, 10:22 AM
Mikey you're welcome to post here but Iím worried people wonít know your painting is here...theyíll only see The Storm in the title of the thread. If you want to post here youíre more than welcome to do so. :) If you decide to start your own thread remember it needs to be in the ďPainting from the Masters forumĒ. It's up to you mate.

I donít think youíre painting is doomed to failure in fact I donít think youíll have any problems with this painting. You might want to have a butchers at this thread about Bouguereau http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=219187

guillot
10-01-2004, 10:40 AM
Hi Bruce (I hope you don't mind me calling you Bruce),
How is this painting coming along?? I'm interested in the process you are using on this piece.

Tina

A Few Pigments
10-01-2004, 12:00 PM
Hi Tina,

Not only do I not mind if you call me Bruce, I prefer it. Itís coming along slowly because my allergies are slowing everything down. Iíd rather have been born without allergies than good looking, and itís heck when I didnít get eitherÖha ha! :)

The process Iím using is painting in opaque layers and blending with nylon brushes. I use a little Liquin sometimes but only if I have to. I was trying to do the Anders Zorn, Impressions de Londres, WIP http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=218076 entirely in glazes with Liquin but my pokey little scanner couldnít see half the glazing so I gave up and Iíll finish it in opaque layers.

Mikey
10-01-2004, 12:17 PM
Bruce,

I'll put it on my own thread. Thanks.

Mikey

A Few Pigments
10-08-2004, 08:17 PM
Most of the work I just did on the face of the tall figure and the hand on the right doesnít show up in this scan. I made this digital image darker to make the face show up betterÖit still looks naff. Iím using terre verte + burnt umber for the sort of olive drab of the dress of the short figure. The hair of the tall figure is terre verte + naples yellow. Iíve found I can do the face of the tall figure with just flake white, vermilion and a very small amount of ivory black the dark, grayed values.

I havenít been painting much lately because last Saturday, Sunday and most of Monday my AC was out. It was 90 in my house during the day and 83 at night. Now my fall allergies are acting up and Iím spending 12 to 14 hours a night sleeping because of them. Oh, how rich and wonderful life really isÖand so it goesÖ

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Oct-2004/42249-The_Storm_B_N_TEST_500_4.jpg

If you want to see Mikeyís threads in the Painting from the Masters forum follow these links.

Bourguereau Gabrielle - WIP http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=219872

Bourguereau, Une Vocation - WIP http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=221232

Heís a much better artist than I am with a lot more experience.

Mikey
10-09-2004, 04:36 PM
It coming good Bruce, with nice contrast from the start. Interesting to see the palette, is this actually Bourguereau's.

The East US seems to have had a really bad year for hurricanes.

Thanks for the links.

Mikey

A Few Pigments
10-09-2004, 04:53 PM
Hi Mikey,

I really donít have any idea what pigments/colors Bourguereau used. I just guess, try mixing the pigments I have to see what works and then have a go. I could just ask one of the better-informed members here but that would take a lot of the fun out of it for me.

Mikey
10-09-2004, 04:59 PM
Bruce, A R C do have a suggested Bourguereau palette on the site. They also have a list of colours he suggests himself, although they say it's unlikely he used them all. I could find the link if you need it.

Mikey

A Few Pigments
10-09-2004, 05:16 PM
Thank you Mikey thatís very kind of you. If you have the time to find the link it would be interesting to see what he used in comparison to what Iím using. I suppose itís better if I donít always do things the hard way. :)

dcorc
10-09-2004, 05:37 PM
Bruce - the palette that ARC lists is:

Naples Yellow (lead antimoniate)
Yellow-Ochre
Chrome Yellow, dark
Viridian
Cobalt Blue
White Lead
Light Vermilion
Chinese Vermilion
Mars Brown (iron oxide);
Van Dyck Brown
Burnt Sienna
Ivory Black
Bitumen
Genuine Rose Madder, dark

There's also a much more extensive listing of WB's paint collection on the same page at

http://www.artrenewal.com/museum/b/Bouguereau_William/mark_walker4.asp

:)

Dave

Mikey
10-09-2004, 05:50 PM
Thanks for the link Dave. I'm still looking to know how he used Naples Yellow. My idea of Chrome Yellow is Cad Yellow Deep mixed with Cad Lemon.

Mikey

Carey Griffel
10-09-2004, 09:58 PM
Just wanted to pop in and add my encouragement! I think you're doing beautifully!!

~!Carey

A Few Pigments
10-10-2004, 01:21 PM
Hi Carey,

Thank you.

With advice from Dave and Arlene I tried a new way of scanningÖbut it didnít work. I discovered I have to use a sheet of clear acetate (as Dave suggested) and I have to use descreen at the same time. That solves the problem Iíve been having with the lighter areas being washed out. Now youíll see everything just as I painted it. Iíll have to try to do a better job from now on.


Dave ta for the link. It looks like I got pretty darn close to the colors Bouguereau would have used. Would you credit it. Or put another way, golly gee wiz!

Bouguereauís Palette

Light Vermilion
Genuine Rose Madder, dark
Naples Yellow (lead antimoniate)
Mars Brown (iron oxide);
Van Dyck Brown
Viridian
White Lead
Ivory Black

My Palette

Cad red light
Alizarin crimson
Naples yellow
Burnt umber
Prussian blue
Terre verte
Flake white
Ivory Black (I forgot to put this in when I posted my palette).

A Few Pigments
10-17-2004, 04:29 PM
Iím about ready to chuck this one in the dustbin, but I wonít. Iím trying to keep all parts of the painting going at the same time instead of working on one thing at a time. The face on the tall figure is only three and three eightís inches high so not a very big space to work in. Iím using a size 0 brush on it. Iím determined to finish this even it takes the rest of my life. I feel Iíve learned everything I need to from this small painting though so Iíll be working on the large version as I finish this small painting.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Oct-2004/42249-The_Storm_B_N_TEST_500_5.jpg

I have to say at this point Iím proud of myself for taking this painting on and no matter how it turns out Iíll feel Iíve accomplished something worthwhile.

A Few Pigments
11-03-2004, 11:36 PM
My reasons for doing this small painting were as follows:
1. To better understand the values in the clouds.
2. To better understand the value relationships between the blue clouds and the blue cloak.
3. To discover if the colors I chose for the palette would really work.

I feel at this point I have a sufficient understanding of the issues listed above to proceed to the final painting. Iím over the moon. It will be nice to push mud around with a hairy stick again.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Nov-2004/42249-The_Storm_B_N_TEST_500_6.jpg

dcorc
11-04-2004, 06:16 AM
Go for it, Bruce!

Dave

A Few Pigments
11-04-2004, 06:20 AM
Thanks Dave. Youíre a sterling fellow, old chap. :)

Mikey
11-04-2004, 07:43 AM
Hi Bruce, glad to see you moving on with this.

Mikey

Nata
11-04-2004, 09:22 AM
Hi, Nora,
nice to find a familiar name:wave:
I am just snooping around the forums; very challenging projects! I may join in sometimes in the future but must find my feet here first. For now - all the best for your WIP. Sincerely, Angela

A Few Pigments
11-04-2004, 01:46 PM
Hi Mikey,
I'm glad i'm moving on with this too. It seems like this thread is older than I am sometimes. :)

A Few Pigments
11-08-2004, 12:09 PM
I had some time to work on this over the last few days. Iím blocking in all the colors before I go any further. This will be a lot different than Bouguereaus. If we all painted the same way it would be a very monotonous and uninteresting world.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Nov-2004/42249-The_Storm_B_500_3.jpg

Mikey
11-08-2004, 12:39 PM
Good to see you moving on with this Bruce. I wonder if there is anybody who could do a convincing Bouguereau sexton blake.

Mikey

A Few Pigments
11-08-2004, 01:25 PM
Hi Mikey, who is sexton blake?

Mikey
11-08-2004, 01:32 PM
Hi Bruce,

Sexton Blake was a famous detective of pulp fiction. But this use of his name is Cockney rhyming slang. Sexton Blake rhymes with fake.

Mikey

A Few Pigments
11-08-2004, 02:39 PM
Hi Mikey,

Blimey, thereís so much to learn. For some reason Iíve never learned Cockney rhyming slang. I donít know why I havenít, it just one of those things I guess. I had a quick butchers though and found these

Cockney Rhyming Slang http://www.cockneyrhymingslang.co.uk/

A Cockney Rhyming Slang Dictionary http://www.aldertons.com/

businessballs http://www.businessballs.com/cockney.htm

Wikipedia The Free Encylopedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cockney_rhyming_slang

phespirit.info http://www.phespirit.info/cockney/

http://www.londonslang.com/

A Dictionary of Slang http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/articles/cockney-rhyming-slang.htm

BBC Cockney Rhyming Slang http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/alabaster/A649

Amherst Lodge, Welcome to the Cockney Rhyming Slang Game http://www.amherstlodge.com/Games/Cockney/cockney_index.htm

Virtual London http://www.virtual-london.co.uk/information/default.asp?type=cockney+slang

Have a Butcher's at this lot http://www.travelbritain.com/trip/slang.html

Cockney Rhyming Slang Guide, with a downloadable 4 page doc http://www.chasndave.co.uk/cockney.html

Google has about 16,700 sites listed for Cockney rhyming slang, so I decided not to list all of them here. Thereís so much to the world besides painting.

Mikey
11-08-2004, 04:21 PM
Hey Bruce, so now you know scapa means split, clear off, or go. The Scapa Flow you may know was used by the Royal Navy in the war. Flow rhymes with go, but they drop that, as when people in Florida go to get shindler's.

A whole lot of sites, but couln't look through them all.

Mikey

Florian
11-09-2004, 06:09 AM
Hello Bruce, Iīm glad to see you moving on with this.

Florian :wave:

A Few Pigments
11-09-2004, 01:24 PM
Hi Florian, yes Iím trying to work on it but I have a lot on my plate now so the progress will be slow. I saw in other threads where you advised other people that you take your time with a painting and that itís a good idea to take oneís time with a Bouguereau. I agree completely, because every time I look at the photograph of The Storm I see more detail.

The more I study the work of the old masters the more I understand that painting is like all of life, itís just an illusion of what we think reality is supposed to be. And because reality is subjective one persons reality is another persons minced pie.


Hi Mikey, no I didnít know about the Royal Navyís use of Scapa Flow in the war. And I donít know about when people in Florida go to get shindler's. the only shindler's I know about is Shindler's list.

Mikey
11-09-2004, 01:32 PM
Hi Bruce,

What rhymes with list, or that just might be another bit of English slang in itself. Pi**ed. We also say ratted, or a few too many.

Mikey

A Few Pigments
11-09-2004, 07:09 PM
To quote Snug in A Midsummer Nightís Dream ďfor I am slow of studyĒ. Iíve heard those expressions used in TV shows from England. Including ďitís pi**ing down with rainĒ, but I guess being a Yank I think of something else when I hear that word. Here it usually just means a person is angry about something.

Iím still trying to get used to calling cookies, biscuits and I wonít even say what I called wellies the last time that subject came up. It was a typo though, it was nothing to do with me mate. Language can be a dangerous thing for one as young and innocent as I. :angel: :wink2:

Mikey
11-09-2004, 07:59 PM
Well me old china, pi**ed here can mean a lot of things as well as being well legless.

Mikey

A Few Pigments
11-09-2004, 08:09 PM
Right, whatís the difference between calling someone ďme old chinaĒ, and calling someone ďsunshineĒ?

Mikey
11-09-2004, 08:17 PM
Right, whatís the difference between calling someone ďme old chinaĒ, and calling someone ďsunshineĒ?

Sunshine I suppose implies someone who is cheerful or good to be with at least. China plate just means mate in the sense of being a friend. But the English being what they are often damm with faint praise, so sunshine is often used sarcastically and the term doesn't necessarily mean friend anyway.

Mikey

A Few Pigments
11-09-2004, 08:36 PM
Iíve often heard Charlie on Ground Force refer to some one as sunshine when sheís displeased with them. Aggro I believe itís called.

Discussing the Kings English is more fun than painting. But I should get back to painting something, I have so much on my plate right now. I have a lot on so I should get stuck in. Itís only a lot of graft that makes an artist good. There are so many ways to say things itís really fascinating.

Iíve always wondered why The Knights Who Say Knee say knee. Just a funny thing for a Knight to say I suppose. But I remember Peter Sellers in the Goon Show always talking about knees and he was always saying he hoped his knees didnít fall off. Iím glad BBC 7 still has The Goon Show on.

Thank you for the chin wag Mikey.

Mikey
11-09-2004, 08:39 PM
On with the motley

Mikey

A Few Pigments
11-09-2004, 11:42 PM
As You Like It, Act II, Scene VII, line 45
JAQUES. I am ambitious for a motley coat.

dcorc
11-10-2004, 05:11 AM
Motley - the multi-coloured coat worn by an entertainer/jester/storyteller :)

Dave

Mikey
11-10-2004, 05:12 AM
Hi Bruce, it's funny how these things get into the language and the origin get's lost somehow. I had a vague idea it was Shakespeare, but you beat me too it. "This is the winter of our discontent" became a favourite with UK journalists some years ago.

Mikey

Mikey
11-10-2004, 05:14 AM
Motley - the multi-coloured coat worn by an entertainer/jester/storyteller :)

Dave

Hi Dave, one of those might suit me as a clown. :wave:

Mikey

Mikey
11-10-2004, 07:53 AM
Now I remember "On with the motley" is from an opera, and I suppose not English. I used it in the sense of getting on with life. Sometimes things are just too awful to bear, or our creative depth my not be understood at which we can easily feel rejection. Our means of survival may be to become the motley fool. I can imagine the opera song being about a rejected suitor who decides that life continues so just let's get on with it with good humour.

Mikey

dcorc
11-10-2004, 09:25 AM
It's from Pagliacci - there's a very useful summary of the plot here:
http://www.operaworld.com/special/pag1.shtml - "On with the motley" is the famous aria from it.

Dave

Mikey
11-10-2004, 09:31 AM
It's from Pagliacci - there's a very useful summary of the plot here:
http://www.operaworld.com/special/pag1.shtml - "On with the motley" is the famous aria from it.

Dave

Thanks for the link Dave. Very interesting.

Mikey

A Few Pigments
11-10-2004, 11:13 AM
This is the ďmotleyĒ I was referring to.

motley
SYLLABICATION: mot∑ley
2. Having many colors; variegated; parti-colored: a motley tunic.
NOUN: Inflected forms: pl. mot∑leys
1. The parti-colored attire of a court jester.
ETYMOLOGY: Middle English motlei, variegated cloth, variegated, probably from Anglo-Norman, probably from Middle English mot, speck.

As You Like It, Act II, Scene VII

JAQUES. A fool, a fool! I met a fool ií the forest,
A motley fool; a miserable world!
As I do live by food, I met a fool;
Who laid him down and baskíd him in the sun,
And railíd on Lady Fortune in good terms,
In good set terms, and yet a motley fool.
ĎGood morrow, fool,í quoth I. ĎNo, sir,í quoth he,
ĎCall me not fool till heaven hath sent me fortune.í
And then he drew a dial from his poke,
And, looking on it with lack-lustre eye,
Says very wisely, ĎIt is ten oíclock;
Thus may we see,í quoth he, Ďhow the world wags:
íTis but an hour ago since it was nine,
And after one hour more ítwill be eleven;
And so, from hour to hour we ripe and ripe,
And then from hour to hour we rot and rot,
And thereby hangs a tale.í When I did hear
The motley fool thus moral on the time,
My lungs began to crow like chanticleer,
That fools should be so deep-contemplative,
And I did laugh sans intermission
An hour by his dial. O noble fool!
A worthy fool! Motleyís the only wear.

DUKE SENIOR. What fool is this?

JAQUES. O worthy fool! One that hath been a courtier,
And says, if ladies be but young and fair,
They have the gift to know it; and in his brain,ó
Which is as dry as the remainder biscuit
After a voyage,óhe hath strange places crammedíd
With observation, the which he vents
In mangled forms. O that I were a fool!
I am ambitious for a motley coat.

Mikey
11-10-2004, 01:29 PM
Yes, but see how the operetta lyrics writer changed it to a noun and so a language progresses, if progress is the right word. A lot of people think that English language had reached it's height in the early part of the Seventeeth Century.

Mikey

A Few Pigments
11-10-2004, 01:53 PM
The silly sods. Language is like art, itís always changing and all judgments are subjective so how could anyone know when itís reached itís heights. Silly sodsÖlol

I have to admit though that I do wish I had been born in Shakespeareís time. The said ďgood evenĒ instead of good evening. They said ďgod buy youĒ instead of good by. And they said ďfie to youĒ instead of all the epithets we use today. Language was much more imaginative and colorful then.

A Few Pigments
11-20-2004, 11:49 PM
A more or less fortnightly update. I have so much on my plate now Iíll just update this thread fortnightly. I wonder if this thread will last as long as The Archers.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Nov-2004/42249-The_Storm_B_500_4.jpg

Mikey
11-21-2004, 12:48 PM
Hey Bruce, I've been feeling the same way about my Bougie, but all good things come to an end at some point. :p You own colours and very nice too.

Hey Bruce, were you actually born before the Archers began.

Mikey

A Few Pigments
11-21-2004, 01:36 PM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/archers/info/

How did the programme start?
In Whit Week 1950, the BBCís Midlands Home Service broadcast five pilot episodes of a new, experimental drama series: The Archers. The producer Godfrey Baseley had previously worked mainly on agricultural programmes. He hoped that farmers would listen for the stories, but along the way pick up messages that would help them feed a Britain still subject to food rationing.

I was born in 1952 so The Archers is about two years older than what I is. However:

Why did the 50th anniversary fall on 1 January 2001?
The pilot week was only heard in the Midlands. The Archers was first broadcast to the whole of the UK on 1 January 1951, and thatís the date that has always been taken for anniversaries.

So that means the national show is one year three months older than me.

Mikey
11-21-2004, 01:55 PM
Hi Bruce,

It's just amazing how some of the most successful things were never really meant to be big time. When the Archers began it was fun, listening with a radio which had a 12 inch speaker in a massive french polished cabinet. The milkman still had a horse and the fabulous new Stork margarine which by all accounts given to us by the advertising tasted exactly the same as butter almost really did when it was compared to that coloured whale fat.

Heck, now I'm almost giving my age away, just don't tell anybody else about this post will you.

Mikey

A Few Pigments
11-21-2004, 05:35 PM
Originally posted by Mikey
just don't tell anybody else about this post will you.

A winkís as good as a nod me old china plate. Bobís your uncle.

A Few Pigments
12-15-2004, 11:42 PM
Iím not coming back to this thread, and Iím not asking for comments on WC again. Everytime I listen to other people I forget who I am and what Iím trying to do. I just have to follow my own voice even if people think Iím a rank amateur I donít care anymore.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep.
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.

A Few Pigments
03-27-2005, 07:12 PM
Six months on.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Mar-2005/42249-The_Storm_B_500_5.jpg

Mikey
03-28-2005, 06:18 AM
Hi Bruce, it's good to see you still working on this. My patience usually gets exhausted at the end of a long job, so I find the final finish difficult.

Mikey

A Few Pigments
03-28-2005, 09:37 PM
I Mikey, Iím determined to finish this even if I make it look good.