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MissMouse
06-06-2001, 11:35 AM
I have been using winsor and newton cake water colours (12 half cakes) and am thinking of getting some tubes. I was wondering what others use? What is the difference? Check out Cake vs Tube

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Life is too short to be stuck in a box! Open the top and hop out!

Ivyleaf
06-06-2001, 02:05 PM
Here's another thread you might find interesting regarding pan versus tubes: http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/Forum4/HTML/000380.html

As for myself, I use WN artist grade tubes.

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"Baby, keep smilin', you know the sun is shinin'" Lou Bega

Leaflin
06-06-2001, 02:35 PM
I use WN artist grade tubes in a John Pike palatte and just refresh when needed. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

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Leaflin

"Imagination makes you see all sorts of things." Georgia O'Keeffe

salmon
06-07-2001, 12:12 AM
I use both cake and tube. Cakes are convenient, but can cause premature wear on your brushes. I use the best quality I can afford because a little bit can go a long way. As they wear down I top up from the tube. I use tube for big juicey washes which would not be practical for cakes.

TMoore
06-07-2001, 12:21 AM
I use tube mysef. But I know of a watercolor portrait artist that uses drybrush techniques and he uses the cake. My guess is that this technique might need paints at a greater paint concentration than the tube allows.

Studio224
06-07-2001, 05:24 AM
Originally posted by Ivyleaf:
Here's another thread you might find interesting regarding pan versus tubes: http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/Forum4/HTML/000380.html

As for myself, I use WN artist grade tubes.




Hi,

I am the one that started this other thread. I can tell you that since then I have tried both... Pans are great to take along to paint on location and do sketches etc... Tubes are better for painting in studio and for big washes... Quality/colors of tubes/pans of the same label, are the same.

As of wearing brushes with pans, I usually use old brushes to prepare big washes...

Anne-Claire

MissMouse
06-08-2001, 03:31 PM
Thank you everyone - now if you could only aford a few of the best what colors would you get ?

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Life is too short to be stuck in a box! Open the top and hop out!

Rod
06-09-2001, 07:15 AM
I use tubes and a plastic palette. Before each painting I squeeze fresh paint into the wells onto of the existing remains. That way no paint is wasted and you always have fresh soft paint.
Colours would depend on your own subjects.
A good bsic list is,
Cobalt Blue
French ultramarine
Light red
raw sienna
Burnt umber
Alizarin crimson
Lemon yellow


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TMoore
06-09-2001, 10:31 AM
For portraits you only need WN Prermanent Alizarin Crimson, WN Winsor Blue, and WN Winsor Yellow. You can get all the other colors typical of portraiture by glazing them together or mixing on the palette. These are all high stain pigments - lots of clean color strength.

Now if you need the special effects in the background related to a 'grainy' look add umber. I know of many who also use this color in flesh tones - I used to as well but have sworn off letting it get in. I used to have so much trouble with portraits suddenly going to mud in the face area until I dropped it. So much peace ever since!