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khourianya
09-07-2004, 12:11 AM
Okay - I have abandoned my playing with landscapes. Attempting photo-realism has never been my style so i don't know why I was trying to force myself in that direction.

Anyway - this piece is already becoming what will be a very special piece for me. It is of Tai - the garden statue in the garden of some very special people to me in England. The statue has always captivated me and tonight I decided to try to bring it to life with my pastels.

Daler-Rowney Paper (choclatey-brown) with a mix of Winsor and Newton, Rembrandt, and Goldfaber pastels. It's nowhere near done, but I wanted to share it with you all. Let me know what you think...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Sep-2004/47843-cori_tai.jpg

emmachester
09-07-2004, 11:40 AM
Cori,

It looks like you have a good beginning here. I understand the desire to capture on paper something that is spiritually or personally significant. and I guess my only suggestion would be to not try to capture the photo-realism of the place, but lean towards the 'feel' of it.

Keep up the good work.

Sherry

khourianya
09-07-2004, 12:33 PM
Thanks, Sherry

my only suggestion would be to not try to capture the photo-realism of the place, but lean towards the 'feel' of it.


That is what I am going to do in my pieces from this point forward. I am enjoying soft pastels too much to not be true to my creative self...

Deborah Secor
09-07-2004, 03:34 PM
Cori, I think you've begun an interesting painting here. I'd like to make a couple of suggestions, both of which work no matter what style you head towards in the end.

First, the blue tape (if that's what it is) around the edge makes it difficult to analyze the colors of the painting. Basically you have a blue 'mat' around the piece from the start, which will have an effect on the overall color structure by influencing every color you put down. I cropped it out and it looks very different:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Sep-2004/23609-cori_tai.jpg

And second, if you roughly put down a layer of color all over the page before beginning the details it saves having to go back and do them again. You've already begun a little of the details that reside in front, such as the flowers, the tree, and the leaves. It's easier if you think of painting from the back to the front. I always tell my students to paint what's behind before they paint what's in front--not to wash the windows before they wash the car! (You just have to do it again.)

This painting has a focused feeling to it, which is enhanced by the central figure and the circle of the garden surrounding it. I hope what I've said helps, and I look forward to seeing what you decide to do next.

Deborah

khourianya
09-07-2004, 07:11 PM
And second, if you roughly put down a layer of color all over the page before beginning the details it saves having to go back and do them again. You've already begun a little of the details that reside in front, such as the flowers, the tree, and the leaves. It's easier if you think of painting from the back to the front. I always tell my students to paint what's behind before they paint what's in front--not to wash the windows before they wash the car! (You just have to do it again.)


Thanks Deborah. I am terrible for working front to back, although I did think it through exactly how I was going to incorporate the background before I even sketched in Tai. I love the analogy about washing the car, though. It's a good one to keep in mind for the future, thanks.

Here is an update of Tai. I still have a lot of work to do on the background...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Sep-2004/47843-revised_tai.jpg

khourianya
09-07-2004, 10:00 PM
and another update...I think I'm about done...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Sep-2004/47843-revised_tai2.jpg

Khadres
09-07-2004, 10:07 PM
Interesting piece! I like the abstractish layout to it and the colors are cool!

khourianya
09-07-2004, 10:37 PM
Thanks Sooz! this one was a lot of fun to do...