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Bam - Steve O Rama
09-05-2004, 07:33 PM
After I finish my canvas painting with acrylic paint,...what do I finish with? Should I spray a smooth even coat of rattle can clear or what?

Also,...I will be using Fredrik's canvas panels(16"x20") - I have some walnut and cherry wood stored in the garage. I enjoy working with wood and I thought I could build a frame for each piece I paint. Does anyone else build their owning frames for their work and do you have a good technique for attaching the panel to the wood?

Thanks,...Steven ;)

Artguy29
09-05-2004, 08:32 PM
You don't need to do anything when you've finished your painting, but some artists varnish their acrylic paintings. I'm not sure what you mean by "rattle can clear" but I assume you mean varnish. Since acrylics are self-sealing, there is no need to varnish, but some do because it tends to bring out the colors and provides further protection. The type of varnish you use is a presonal preference. I use a matte varnish as apposed to a gloss varnish, for example, because it won't leave any type of "finish". If you decide to varnish your paintings, I would suggest using a spray varnish rather then one you apply with a brush. I find them much easier to use. Be sure to check the labels of the varnishes as some are for different uses. Not sure about framing; haven't attempted framing canvas panels.

Dave

Bam - Steve O Rama
09-05-2004, 08:46 PM
Thanks Dave,... I saw some spray can varnish at Hobby Lobby store but never used it in the past. I was asking bout rattle can clear. After I paint softball helmets I clear them with spray can clear. I use the brand the dollar Store carries. Its like Wal-Mart brand in the spray paint section.

Thanks,...Steven :wave: ;) :D

coherent
09-05-2004, 08:57 PM
The best argument for clear coating is that some colors seem to look duller than others once dry. I'm sure others could elaborate more, but some acrylic pigment colors seem to dry with a little different sheen... also, the dry look seems to depend on how much it was thinned, with what (water or medium) and how thick. In my opinion a clear coat will even it out if that makes sense. Many folks use a clear satin or gloss after completing an acrylic painting. Both spray on or brushed is popular depending on your tastes. A search on clear coating acrylics should give you plenty of opinions and info.
-marc

Lady Carol
09-05-2004, 10:32 PM
Actually, for those who don't believe in varnishing their art once finished ultimately in the long run this will be detrimental. As per recent conversation with an art restorer, who stated that dust, grot and grime etc can damage the acrylic paint. Her suggestion was to varnish the art for longevity.

So my method for varnishing is to brush on a glazing medium to gloss up the colours. Once that is dry then brush on 2 thin coats of gloss varnish. This works better (for me anyway) than the spray as I tend to spray unevenly with a can.

Bam - Steve O Rama
09-05-2004, 11:07 PM
Thanks for the replys everyone,...

God Bless,...Steven :wave: :wave: ;)

Einion
09-06-2004, 02:14 PM
Hi Steven, varnishing is optional but if you want your work to endure in good condition it's a good idea, either that or frame the finished painting behind glass. Golden, Liquitex, W&N and other makers of artists' acrylics now make spirit-soluble varnishes that current thinking suggests is the best approach. Considering where you live you'll probably find Liqutex's Soluvar and Golden's MSA varnish the easiest to find.

There are quite a few past threads that cover varnishing if you want to search for them for more info and discussion. Golden and Liquitex both have information on their sites about varnishing if you're interested, Golden in particular have ongoing research programmes into the issue.


Since acrylics are self-sealing, there is no need to varnish...
This is a common misconception Dave but it's for precisely this reason that acrylic paintings should be protected in some way.

Einion

Bam - Steve O Rama
09-06-2004, 02:35 PM
Einion,... thanks for the info. I will check out the golden and see what I can come up with.

Thanks,...Steven ;) :wave:

champagneharley
09-06-2004, 03:28 PM
After I finish my canvas painting with acrylic paint,...what do I finish with? Should I spray a smooth even coat of rattle can clear or what?

Also,...I will be using Fredrik's canvas panels(16"x20") - I have some walnut and cherry wood stored in the garage. I enjoy working with wood and I thought I could build a frame for each piece I paint. Does anyone else build their owning frames for their work and do you have a good technique for attaching the panel to the wood?

Thanks,...Steven ;)

I'm a 'lazy' artist. I try to get away with doing as little as possible.
HOWEVER ...
Having been requested by a gallery to GLOSS varnish my artwork. I now ALWAYS will!
The difference is AMAZING.
I also recently attended a paint workshop (all about paints and mediums) - and the reason for varnishing .... to protect your artwork - same as the front of tv screen gets 'junk' on it, so do paintings!
Again, being lazy, the first 2 times I varnished, I used a rattle can.
I was pleased with the result, and thought I did well.
HOWEVER ...
After using a brush - first horizontally, then a 2nd coat vertically - that is the way I'll go in future - much better than holding my breath wondering if I am going to get 'runs' or drop the painting in the grass, or if it's going to rain, or wind is going to blow something onto the surface and STICK! - while I'm outdoors spraying.
I'm not an expert, I've done less than a dozen acrylic paintings, but that is how I feel about it at the moment.
Regards,
Jillian

sassybird
09-06-2004, 04:57 PM
I prefer a spray for some and paint on varnish for other mediums. Acrylics, for me, is better sprayed. I tend to get brush makes in the little dips and brush strokes from the acrylics. It drives me nuts, so the spray can comes out. I like a matte or a satin varnish. It brings out the colors without causing a glare when you view the piece from the side, or if the light is hitting it in a certain way.