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jyvonne
08-31-2004, 02:19 PM
Hello...

I haven't completed a painting for quite a while, but I finally think this one is just about done except for a few tiny adjustments. I got the image from the WC library originally, but somehow now I cannot find the original picture or photographer to thank them for posting the photo.

This is done in acrylic on 8X10 canvas.

Any comments or constructive critism is welcome.

Have a good day.
jyvonne

amaze_1101
08-31-2004, 02:28 PM
It's very clever. I can't see annnnnnnnnnyyyyyyyyy mistakes at all. In fact I can't see ANYTHING at all!
:D

You might need to upload the painting for us now. :wave:

jyvonne
08-31-2004, 02:34 PM
Don't know why my attachment didn't work, but we'll try again!
jyvonne

amaze_1101
08-31-2004, 02:48 PM
He's verrry cute. Love the expression in his eyes.

Only critique would be that I'd like to see more 'life' in his eyes as in reflected lights and maybe some whisker detail around the nose.

He's adorable! :)

Artguy29
08-31-2004, 02:57 PM
jyvonne,

This is outstanding :clap: !!! Your tones and colors are superb. Any tips on painting fur like that? Well done!!!

Dave

jyvonne
08-31-2004, 03:01 PM
Thanks for your comments, Elaine. I had also wondered about the whiskers... the photo didn't have any that I could see, but I had considered adding a few.

As for the eyes, I will have to study my own dog a bit for that one. The photo ref. pretty much looks like just black eyes with a glint of light. (The lack of color variation I could see may have been due to my computer) I did add some burnt sienna and just a tad of cobalt blue in the eyes to bring some color into them, but perhaps a few more reflections would help.

Thanks for your comments and suggestions.
jyvonne

jyvonne
08-31-2004, 03:27 PM
Thanks Dave!

What I do for the fur is mix some Golden satin glaze with my acrylics, and then block out the midtones for the different sections I will be working with in the subject. Next, I take just a tad of my paint/glaze and mix it with water until it is pretty dilute and put multiple layers of the colors on the animal. Sometimes I will throw in a layer or a few random strokes of very dilute red or blue (or yellow... whatever seems to accent in the animals' fur in the light) just to add depth and variation. As my layers increase in numbers, I also decrease the amount of water I dilute the paint/glaze with to make the fur a little more defined. I try to draw a few brush strokes into the next color so that it looks more natural and less patchy. Also, I often use a dry brush to soften the edges here and there to give it a little bit of a fluffier look, when needed. A lot of what I do with the layering, I learned from reading the article (on the Acrylic channel of this site) about painting "Kes" and also looking at some posts Larry Seiler has made about his wildlife painting before he started painting plein aire. And also just reading other posts and seeing the suggestions that far more experienced artists are sharing with others as they do some of the things I am trying to learn.

The other thing I do with the fur is take notice of the direction the fur is laying on the animal and try to follow those contours with my brush strokes. There is an article somewhere on this site about "drawing a fur map".

I'm pretty new of this and these articles and threads really made a difference in my approach to painting. I know I have a long way to go in learning, but those are the things that have helped me in the "fur department" so far.

Thank you for your encouraging words.
jyvonne

jyvonne
08-31-2004, 03:42 PM
Thanks Dave!

What I do for the fur is mix some Golden satin glaze with my acrylics, and then block out the midtones for the different sections I will be working with in the subject. Next, I take just a tad of my paint/glaze and mix it with water until it is pretty dilute and put multiple layers of the colors on the animal. Sometimes I will throw in a layer or a few random strokes of very dilute red or blue (or yellow... whatever seems to accent in the animals' fur in the light) just to add depth and variation. As my layers increase in numbers, I also decrease the amount of water I dilute the paint/glaze with to make the fur a little more defined. I try to draw a few brush strokes into the next color so that it looks more natural and less patchy. Also, I often use a dry brush to soften the edges here and there to give it a little bit of a fluffier look, when needed. A lot of what I do with the layering, I learned from reading the article (on the Acrylic channel of this site) about painting "Kes" and also looking at some posts Larry Seiler has made about his wildlife painting before he started painting plein aire. And also just reading other posts and seeing the suggestions that far more experienced artists are sharing with others as they do some of the things I am trying to learn.

The other thing I do with the fur is take notice of the direction the fur is laying on the animal and try to follow those contours with my brush strokes. There is an article somewhere on this site about "drawing a fur map".

I'm pretty new of this and these articles and threads really made a difference in my approach to painting. I know I have a long way to go in learning, but those are the things that have helped me in the "fur department" so far.

Thank you for your encouraging words.
jyvonne

sassybird
08-31-2004, 04:14 PM
He is adorable! The only things that I see needing some work has already been mentioned except for some highlights on the nose to make it look nice and wet. I think you did a wonderful job on him:)

Artguy29
08-31-2004, 04:42 PM
Jyvonne, I forgot to ask, how long did this take you?

Dave

coherent
08-31-2004, 06:03 PM
Cute puppy, very well done... lighting on the fur on the head is terrific.
-marc

jyvonne
08-31-2004, 06:52 PM
Thank you Marc and Charissa for your comments. As a new painter, it really encourages me to hear your responses and ideas.

Dave... actually, I lost track of hours. I had been doing several paintings at once and thought I would save time, but just ended up with a pile of unfinished works. That was just too discouraging. So, I decided to polish off this puppy... then I may or may not tackle the rest. I think from now on, I will do one work at a time... its more encouraging to turn out a new work every few days.

A rough estimate (very rough- based on how long it took me to do other animals) would be 10 to 15 hours. But I really don't know. Plus, I haven't painted for a couple of weeks because the school year started up and I had to invest my time teaching. I really can't remember how long I worked on this painting from start to finish. Sorry I can't give you a clearer answer.

jyvonne

Lady Carol
09-01-2004, 10:12 AM
jyvonne, how cute. You have really captured the essence of the puppy. Just a few finishing touches and you are done as per other comments.

This is one of the better puppy paintings I have seen in a long time.

:clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

jyvonne
09-01-2004, 12:02 PM
Thank you, Carol. Your encouragement is going a long way. I would like to start selling some of my paintings, but being so new, am a little insecure. Hearing that I did a good job gives me a boost in my confidence.

Thanks again.
jyvonne