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Dyin
08-30-2004, 06:49 PM
Oil Pastel Classroom August 2004
Tree basics

This month we’re exploring a subject that I myself have struggled with. It’s easy to hear the principles for creating landscape trees, but it has been a bit difficult to apply them with oil pastel. I have done countless practice pieces this last month trying to come up with a basic guideline to follow, which we then can take and expand on for different uses.

I’ve done two demos, the first I didn’t finish because I wanted to show the effect different approaches have. Our own guide Kyle graciously also did an example of this same one in her own unique style to show us a different approach. I also did a quick 10 minute piece to show the exact way I found to lay down colors for trees. It’s rough but it’s effective.

Here are some good links to give you an idea of basic tree anatomy and techniques.

http://www.currys.com/knowledge/anatomy.asp (link for tree anatomy helpfully provided by our own Stonewhiteclown...thanks Alex!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=133891 (how to make a path of light wc thread by Ruth)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=209022 (tchris52 technique for tree painting..soft pastel)

Some other things to remember when doing trees.

Don’t try to get all the details…as you can see from my demo it’s too easy to get lost in it all and the oil pastels start to blend too much.

Contrast is extremely important

Remember to leave sky holes

Remember that leaves grow from the ends of the branches and some fall forward and others behind.

Pay attention to the trunk…it narrows as it goes higher and light will hit one side of it

As an artist you have the artistic license to create a more pleasing shape

Blues, violet and blue greens are good for showing the under growth and for trees in the distance

Here’s demo #1, a willow, which is a bit advanced for learning tree basics, but taught me a whole lot. Since I didn’t feel it was a success I wasn’t going to use it, but I think it may help you to avoid some of the pitfalls I fell into.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Aug-2004/19147-Willow_step_one.jpg

I found using a dark paper was much easier than white. I first laid down the obvious shadow areas, but I was to later find out that I went a touch too light…the green was supposed to denote the darker areas. I should have laid a deeper blue

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Aug-2004/19147-Willow_step_two.jpg

I then laid in the basic shape of the trunk and the grass as a guideline

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Aug-2004/19147-Willow_step_three.jpg

then I started to lay in a background so I could judge the tones…I really went about this all backwards. But to be honest I didn’t know I was even going to do a background…remember, I’m not really a landscape artist…I should have done a quick study to figure out my composition and contrasts first.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Aug-2004/19147-Willow_Step_four.jpg

ok…here’s where I started to see what I’d done wrong. I hadn’t gone dark enough for the shadows. The oil pastels were slipping over each other and losing definition. I was getting what we call mud. I knew the tree should have various colors but I just couldn’t make the Ops do what I wanted. I almost stopped here.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Aug-2004/19147-Willow_Step_four.jpg

I was getting a little closer by this stage..you can see I went a lot darker but still was extremely unhappy with the undefined strokes in a lot of the areas. My trouble was that I was trying to use a soft pastel approach and it doesn’t work with the oilies.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Aug-2004/19147-willow_end_stage.jpg

I did stop here…you can see that I could have went several ways with this…but for the most part I was fighting my support. A good toothed paper would have allowed me more control on strokes. I had learned at this point that you need the darks to bring out the lights and that planning ahead would have made a lot of difference. I did scumble some light blue and greens over the dark area to the right and it was effective as a dark mass. I never did get to highlight the trunk.

Here is Kat’s version of this ref…when I tried this loose expressive approach all I got was a hairy ball that looked like a chia pet! Kat really caught the sunlit effects and wind movement characteristic of willow trees.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Aug-2004/19147-willow.JPG

Thanks Kat…great expression and light here!


I learned a lot with my willow study and what follows was a much more successful 10 minute study that I did standing at a window looking out (as it was too hot for a plein aire approach.)

This is the method I discovered for successfully using oil pastels for trees.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Aug-2004/19147-tree_demo_1.jpg

Find the darkest areas and block them in…you can scribble them or lay them in with the side of the pastel…use a cool dark color.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Aug-2004/19147-tree_demo_2.jpg

now lay in the brightest areas where the sun hits strongest.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Aug-2004/19147-tree_demo_3.jpg


I next laid a little orange just below the light areas. Then I took a bright green and went over the light area and some of the orange…allowing a couple really light spots to remain. I took a dark green and went over the blue, allowing some of the blue to show. It’s a very simplified tree, but it’s a base technique to work with. Different greens, lights and blues will give different colors.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Aug-2004/19147-tree_demo_4.jpg

Here you can see another way I could have done the willow or a big evergreen.
1. dark green in the general shape of the leafed branch
2. dark blue for the shaded area
3. orange overlapping the two
4. a very pale light green for base of sunlight area
5. bright green very lightly passed over the whole thing to tie it together…

Ok…now I am really hoping some of the more experienced landscapers will come in and show us even better and more effective ways of approaching this. But I would like to see us try this approach and then adapt it to your own style. You can use trees in nature or try using the image library references you can find here…

http://www.wetcanvas.com/RefLib/showgallery.php?si=tree&x=11&y=9

Please share your results on this thread telling us what you may have learned that will help us all to be more knowledgeable in our studies. Thanks very much for the wonderful participation in all the previous classes…I’m really looking forward to seeing your results!

Sue/Dyin

ColorMyWorld
08-30-2004, 06:59 PM
Thanks for the lesson Sue.

I would not have thought of putting down the darkest and lightest and working toward the middles. I usually work dark to light. I'll have to try this.

One point to add. If you have a lot of trees, work farthest away first. The idea of what is in front of what comes across better that way.

Dyin
08-30-2004, 07:17 PM
Thanks for the tip, Ann! I do know that further trees will have less details, but it makes sense to work your way forward. :)

Biggles7268
08-31-2004, 07:44 AM
Ooooooooooooh thank you for doing this one.

/me is excited

Pat Isaac
08-31-2004, 09:03 AM
:D This is going to be such fun. Thank you so much for doing this and a "willow tree??" Wow, great job. I'm not sure I would attempt this. It is so good to see how everyone approaches this subject. Kat, I like your wispiness. I have already picked out a few trees from the library. I also am posting the only tree I ever did in OPs and I did it the way you suggested dark masses and then light. I did put in most of the trunk first so I knew where to put the masses.lol

Pat

Dyin
08-31-2004, 10:04 AM
Geez, Pat...you could have done this class...that's a great tree!!! Rocks are good too :D How large is this and do you remember what support you used? I like that you allowed it to go out of the picture plane...i need to plan better, my willow was going to fit in nicely but it grew a little and ended up crowded looking. You have nice clean separation between all the tones and that's what had frustrated me so much, glad to know what I finally figured out is the way it's done by someone else :D Thanks so much for joining in!

Pat Isaac
08-31-2004, 10:25 AM
Thanks, Sue. I used Sennelier La Carte paper lt. blue and it is 22"x 28". The art center that I belong to had a paint in the garden event in conjunction with a garden tour of local estates. We were given the estate to paint on and, of course, I hate to paint outside and I don't do landscapes. I went to the house several days before the event to see what was there and I loved this tree. I took a ton of pictures and started it in my studio. Fortunately, the day dawned very drizzly and raw so I could stay in my studio.lol :D

Pat

Dyin
08-31-2004, 10:58 AM
lol....sounds like my kind of plein aire :p Yeah, think size makes things easier...what's your favorite surface to work on...do you have an underpainting with this one?

Pat Isaac
08-31-2004, 12:52 PM
My favorite surface is Wallis. I used it for the first time last year and I really like the way the pastel goes on the paper, plus Wallis takes a lot of abuse. I also like Colorfix and Sennelier La Carte. I just started trying colorfix ground (which comes in jars) on Sennelier #D360 paper. I don't use underpainting as I usually have toned paper. The only underpainting that I've done is to tone the paper. I really don't like to work against white. :)

Pat

greenpearl
08-31-2004, 02:04 PM
Thanks for the demo, Sue. Trees are (slightly) less scary now, and I might try one some day. A very simple one - not like Pat's, which is awesome. :clap:

Dyin
08-31-2004, 03:10 PM
Thanks for the demo, Sue. Trees are (slightly) less scary now, and I might try one some day. A very simple one - not like Pat's, which is awesome. :clap:

whaddayamean, someday??? That's what this study group is for! Just try the simple one...I did! It's just to get a feel for how to put the OPs on the paper and make a tree, not to create some great masterpiece. It's really great that we get excellent artists like Pat to join in, gives us something to attain to :D and we can see that it works with some practice. Can't learn unless we try and as I've learned myself, no success without failure to learn from. (Am I persuasive enough? :p )

Pat Isaac
08-31-2004, 04:24 PM
:o :o :o blush, blush. Thanks, but I'm here to echo Sue's admonition. whaddaya mean wait??? Do it now and very soon you'll be making great trees...This is a place to learn and practise. Maybe I'll even do more landscapes. :rolleyes: lol

Pat

Biggles7268
08-31-2004, 06:30 PM
Just got my new set of Senneliers today and am playing with them, I don't have a real camera to take any pics with but here is a low rez webcam snapshot lol.

still playing with it, trying to get a feel for these OP's which so far are MUCH better than the ones I've been using.

lol those came out blurrier than I had hoped.

Kathryn Wilson
08-31-2004, 07:14 PM
:D This is going to be such fun. Thank you so much for doing this and a "willow tree??" Wow, great job. I'm not sure I would attempt this. It is so good to see how everyone approaches this subject. Kat, I like your wispiness. I have already picked out a few trees from the library. I also am posting the only tree I ever did in OPs and I did it the way you suggested dark masses and then light. I did put in most of the trunk first so I knew where to put the masses.lol

Pat

Pat, this is just stunning - it looks so real and soooo well done. Bravo!

Dyin
08-31-2004, 07:16 PM
wooohooo Biggles!!! New toys AND a tree for us all in one day!!! I'm excited and didn't even get any :p And this is a pretty good tree too...especially like the lacy effect. A couple things to think about...think about where the trunk might show instead of sky holes in the center area of the branches, you can just dot the color you're using for the trunk wherever you think it might be. Another is to start thinking about sunlight hitting one side or another as contrast makes the best paintings. A little light would show on some of the trunk too. But I think you did a GREAT job on this little guy! I love the crookedness of the trunk too! :clap:

greenpearl
08-31-2004, 07:16 PM
All right, then - here's my tree. It has lots of little leaves and lots of airy spaces (at least in the photo), so I gave it a more luscious look. Well, I tried.

I don't think I've done a landscape since, what, high school? (let's not go there). Kind of different, drawing something that doesn't have eyes. :)

Biggles, nice tree! But I know what you mean with blurry. This is the clearest picture I was able to take with the digi cam. Strange things happen when you photograph OPs: they're blurry, the colours are different, and strange white specks show up that you don't see on the original. Oh well.

Dyin
08-31-2004, 07:34 PM
good for you! :clap: Know it's about trees but gotta say I love that adobe! Looks like you followed a lot of :D the rules...nice branching and sky holes. It has a cottonwood feel, which is the tree I'd expect to see in this scene. A hint...if you soften the background mountain behind the tree with a little pale blue you'll get more depth and keep the edge real unfocused too :)
Thanks for joining in...now don't stop here...think of all the trees there are to paint teehee!!! And...great job, I had a lot harder time with a lacy type tree. :D :clap:

Biggles7268
08-31-2004, 07:47 PM
wooohooo Biggles!!! New toys AND a tree for us all in one day!!! I'm excited and didn't even get any :p And this is a pretty good tree too...especially like the lacy effect. A couple things to think about...think about where the trunk might show instead of sky holes in the center area of the branches, you can just dot the color you're using for the trunk wherever you think it might be. Another is to start thinking about sunlight hitting one side or another as contrast makes the best paintings. A little light would show on some of the trunk too. But I think you did a GREAT job on this little guy! I love the crookedness of the trunk too! :clap:


one thing that was giving me trouble was the pic i chose was kind of foggy so the sunlight was not strong, also I attempted to make the branches in the front a lighter color and to seperate them from the darker ones in the back but it didn't work out very well. And there is bits of trunk showing through on there i'm not sure if they showed up in those pictures very well at all lol

greenpearl
08-31-2004, 07:50 PM
Thanks, Sue. What - one tree isn't good enough? You mean we have to do more? Sheesh! :rolleyes: :D

Biggles7268
08-31-2004, 07:58 PM
greenpearl, your piece if fantastic. I wish i could get that much detail in mine lol.

Dyin
08-31-2004, 08:39 PM
no, you don't HAVE to do more...but.......teehee! I think you did great Biggles, it's hard to get good pics and good on you for trying to get branches to come forward..remember to leave that area light, working dark around it, that might help next time.

Pat Isaac
09-01-2004, 08:19 AM
Biggles, I think you succeeded in getting a foggy feel to your little tree. Don't you just love those new Senneliers?
Greenpearl, Nice tree. You certainly have the feel of the branching and foliage. The little white spots may be due to the texture of the paper. What kind of paper did you use? :

:D :D :clap: :clap:

Pat

greenpearl
09-01-2004, 11:59 AM
Thanks Biggles, thanks Pat.

Pat, the paper is Strathmore Pastel paper. I find that you have to cover it so thickly that you can practically scate on it before the white dots disappear in the photo. In real life you don't see them as much - somehow taking photographs seems to highlight them.

Marge Cline
09-01-2004, 02:01 PM
Hi. Been anxiously waiting for this thread to start. Have put away the soft pastels and found a box of oil pastels to try out. Have never used them, so trees will be my first experitmenting. Went the WC library and found some really neat pictures of trees. So many, I don't know which to try first! Just going for the trees now, no backgrounds or skies. I hope one uses the same paper for oil pastels as for soft. Yes??? No??? Got about an hour to play with this before I have to leave.

Dyin
09-01-2004, 02:57 PM
Hi. Been anxiously waiting for this thread to start. Have put away the soft pastels and found a box of oil pastels to try out. Have never used them, so trees will be my first experitmenting. Went the WC library and found some really neat pictures of trees. So many, I don't know which to try first! Just going for the trees now, no backgrounds or skies. I hope one uses the same paper for oil pastels as for soft. Yes??? No??? Got about an hour to play with this before I have to leave.

Marge that's great!!! You can use a lot of the same papers, some work better than others. I'm pretty sure there's a thread on papers here...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=191193

just a tree is fine....can't wait to see!!! :clap:

Marge Cline
09-01-2004, 03:18 PM
IN my exhuberance, I think I may have the wrong medium here. Tell me are NuPastels oil or soft. The other box I found I had says Artista OIl Pastels, so I know those are oils. These are garage sale "treasures" that I forgot I had!
Anyway, did most of the pics with the Nupastels and tried to use a bit of the others, but they were very hard to work with. Took about an hour with three ot four interuptions...

Marge Cline
09-01-2004, 03:25 PM
Yippee! Love those garage sales. Just found two more boxes that are definitely oil pastels..one says Weber, the other Loew Cornell. Will try them on the next tree. Maybe a couple of days before I get to it though, have to deal with the reality of what else has to be done around here. :mad:

Dyin
09-01-2004, 03:39 PM
wow...that came out great Marge! Nupastels are soft pastels but NEOPASTELS are oil pastels. But now you have more oil pastels to try out. I think you did really well with this. Sorry that life is hard but admire you for taking some time for you and your art :clap:

Marge Cline
09-01-2004, 05:44 PM
OK, here it is with the oil pastels. They sure are different to work with than the soft ones. The Weber ones were too dry to work with; the Loew were OK and the artista really soft and smeary. Gotta get to a meeting now
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Sep-2004/48361-tree3.jpg

Dyin
09-01-2004, 05:56 PM
I started with the Loews. The professional grades are better but they all take some getting used to. I'd say you did fantastic with them though. It's a better looking tree than mine :p Hope you'll keep working with them...if you can do this well first try and cheap ones, then you're going to do some wonderful work with them. :clap:

Pat Isaac
09-01-2004, 06:40 PM
Wow!! Great tree. I can't wait to see more of your oilies and yes, they are very different from the softies. I think we all started with cheapies and moved on. This is a great start. :clap: :clap: :clap:

Pat

Biggles7268
09-01-2004, 07:12 PM
wow that was really excellent Marge :) :clap:

greenpearl
09-01-2004, 09:38 PM
Ooh, very nice! :clap: Amazing, the difference between OPs and the soft pastels.

cjkelly
09-02-2004, 12:00 AM
Great trees everyone, I've enjoyed watching everyone's progress. Thanks Sue for another wonderful demo.
I will try and have a go when my new op's turn up (soon hopefully), but this darn computer is popping up fatal exception errors and freezing with ominous regularity, so not sure how it will go.

cj

Dyin
09-02-2004, 12:10 AM
hope we don't lose you cj! look forward to seeing your tree!

anney
09-02-2004, 02:19 AM
OK, here it is with the oil pastels. They sure are different to work with than the soft ones. The Weber ones were too dry to work with; the Loew were OK and the artista really soft and smeary. Gotta get to a meeting now

That's a very nice tree. Never heard of "Artista", but some brands don't cross the ocean.

I look forward seing more of your work,

Anne

Biggles7268
09-03-2004, 08:45 AM
ARGH this is making me wish I had an actual camera LOL. This webcam seems to almost eliminate quite a few of the colors in here, not to mention the bad light not helping anything.

anyway I've been playing with the same tree a little bit not done, just playing around with different colors hehe :D

Hopefully it will stay sunny this weekend so I can walk down the valley I live in and sketch some of the trees in here.

BeckyMc
09-03-2004, 09:42 AM
I've been working on salvaging some files from my broken Gateway all week, so haven't been looking at WC. Glad to see you're finally able to post Biggles, hope you like your Sennelier's. I'll go back and look at everyone's work later; now I need to post this and get to work. Great job on the demo Sue and Kat.

This huge tree is from a photo that my daughter took while on a high school trip; I dug it out of some of her photos, while looking for a tree to paint. There's a tiny little person standing at the base, probably a friend of hers - I may put her friend in later. It's either a French, Irish or English tree, in some sort of tourist attraction, I'm sure. I'd like to surprise my daughter with this, so I plan to finish it soon. C&C welcome!

Photo is also crooked, as I'm in hurry and a lousy photographer!

Sennelier on 9 1/2 x 16 Oyster Canson

Dyin
09-03-2004, 10:05 AM
Biggles I love that your little tree is finding a home! I like how the front branches are starting to come forward and so glad you want to tackle more trees :clap:
Becky....what a grandfather tree! Your daughter will be pleased with this...all of you do great trees...are you finding it easy to lay down the OPs this way?

Biggles7268
09-03-2004, 03:42 PM
That's a gorgeous tree Becky :)

greenpearl
09-03-2004, 08:49 PM
Becky, that's a really lovely tree. :clap: I'm curious how big the tiny person is - I hope you'll include him / her.

Biggles, your tree is looking positively jaunty! :D

Didn't have any time for trees this week, or anything else. :(

ab39z
09-03-2004, 09:14 PM
I was asked to give the steps I used to create the trees in my most recent post, "Ocracoke Light." So, here goes. I've uploaded a "detail" crop from that piece so you can see some of what I'm talking about.


1) I always start with a pencil sketch of the exact or near-exact shape I want the tree to be. This sketch should include any spots where the trunk or branches show through the canopy and any "holes" through which the sky or other background shows.

2) I use a touch of black very lightly at the top of the visible trunk just under the canopy and on the shadow side of the trunk. I do this first so the other colors can tone down the black.

3) Next I use the darkest brown I have, which is nearly black, to expand the shadows. I go over all the black and enlarge the "colored" area slightly.

4) I use the lightest brown I have -- burnt sienna, I think -- to give a highlight to the side of the trunk opposite the shadow side I created with the black.

5) Now I use a middle brown to fill out the rest of the trunk. I also go over all the black and darkest brown very lightly and let the sticks blend themselves slightly.

6) I finish out the trunk with a touch of grey-green in the shadows.

7) Now it's time to work on the canopy (the leaves). I start by outlining the entire canopy area with a darkish medium green with a very heavy line. I also outline the "holes."

8) Now you can lightly cover the canopy with a medium green if you want to limit the amount of paper color that shows through. Be careful not to fill any areas where the trunk or branches or background will show through.

9) Next I begin filling in with each shade of green I have (except the lightest) with short, sharp strokes that are fairly heavy and a little "squiggly." I do this with each green until the entire canopy area is nearly completely covered. I use one shade at a time and I keep moving around the canopy, careful not to get too concentrated in any one area with a single shade. Again, be careful to leave the necessary holes.

10) Then I use a blue-green, black and either dark blue or dark purple to create a few shadow areas.

11) I use the lightest shade of green I have and maybe a little yellow to create even fewer highlight areas.

12) Then, I use the darkest brown and a little black to create a handful of small trunk and branch lines within the canopy. The one in the example didn't have any visible branches within the canopy.

13) Finally I use a dark grey or grey-green to defocus a few spots in the canopy.

And, there you go. A tree by me. Hope this helps somebody.

AB

ab39z
09-03-2004, 09:17 PM
Sorry about the double post. I tried to stop it, but it was too fast.

AB

Dyin
09-03-2004, 09:17 PM
Anthony...thank you very much...you give a great tutorial! I may just be hitting you up for a forum article :D , this will be a great help to people. I'm so glad you de-lurked, you're already becoming a real contributing member!
Greenpearl...maybe next week...this is open for the whole month. :D

Dyin
09-03-2004, 09:19 PM
no problem...I asked our moderator to delete the first post...happens to all of us!

ColorMyWorld
09-03-2004, 10:59 PM
ARGH this is making me wish I had an actual camera LOL. This webcam seems to almost eliminate quite a few of the colors in here, not to mention the bad light not helping anything.

anyway I've been playing with the same tree a little bit not done, just playing around with different colors hehe :D

Hopefully it will stay sunny this weekend so I can walk down the valley I live in and sketch some of the trees in here.

This is a GREAT tree! :clap:

It has so much character!

ColorMyWorld
09-03-2004, 11:03 PM
This huge tree is from a photo that my daughter took while on a high school trip; I dug it out of some of her photos, while looking for a tree to paint. There's a tiny little person standing at the base, probably a friend of hers - I may put her friend in later. It's either a French, Irish or English tree, in some sort of tourist attraction, I'm sure.

It has to be an English tree because it looks just like I imagine a tree would in Sherwood Forest. :p

naturegirl
09-04-2004, 12:46 PM
Becky -- That is a really beautiful painting! :clap: It reminds me of an 18th-century classical landscape. You captured a great sense of distance and atmosphere -- the lavender color makes the background seem about 30 miles away!

Jennifer

Marge Cline
09-04-2004, 06:38 PM
Well, I drove from Chicago to Cleveland and discovered I made the trip for nothing; the event is next weekend. However, all was not lost...while waiting to discover I was 7 days early, I got to paint a tree! Took a picture of it first then recorded what I did, as I did it. Great fun and passed the time. I learned
...oil pastels take a lot of thinking ahead, changes aren't easy
...some are soft, some are hard and even from the same set of pastels they can be different
...easier not to use an easel as pressure is needed to paint...at least with the ones I'm using
...really cool effects are possible when one heats them up and spreads them around with variously shaped metal objects. Also was able to scratch texture into trunk and needles. I used a old cuticle pusher and then sacrificed one of my barrettes to the cause. When I try this at home again, I'm gonna lite a candle to heat up my toys instead of using my lighter.
...also discovered how to make water spray and misty parts of paintings...will put that part in a second post. For now here's a tree, somewhere outside of Cleveland Ohio.

Dyin
09-04-2004, 06:51 PM
Marge, that's a great tree you have there and an even greater story...love that you made something positive come out of the experience. I can see you're not done with the bottom yet, but the top is 100% believeable, I'm ready to start hanging ornaments :clap:

Marge Cline
09-04-2004, 07:08 PM
this is about as far as I will take this. under the tree I started messing around seeing how to "draw" water with OP. after I put some down, I cut a little bit of the tip of a white pastel off, right above where I wanted some indication of a wave. Heated up the cuticle stick with my lighter and smeared it around. Then took the "crumbs that had dropped off and squished them with my finger over the water...eureka! instant mist and water droplets>

Dyin
09-04-2004, 07:47 PM
how fun....to me that is the very best part of OPs, experimenting! Am glad you're having fun with this...we'll have water coming up in December...so keep playing :D

Biggles7268
09-04-2004, 08:09 PM
I love what you did with the water, and your tree is beautifull. :clap:

cjkelly
09-05-2004, 01:39 AM
Marge: it's great to see you having fun with the OP experiments. They really are more than just a drawing instrument. :cool:

Here's my attempt - it's a Melaluca tree (or Paperbark), on dark brown Canson (I think - it was a scrap I found in a box) - a tad bigger than 6 x 9". Enjoyed doing the bark more than the leaves!

cj

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Sep-2004/26542-Tree_0409050027.JPG

Dyin
09-05-2004, 12:18 PM
cj...great tree! and a fantastic trunk it is...I had wondered if these were paper bark trees...they had these in south Florida...I loved that bark! Just layers of parchment! This would really pop majestically with a dark background, maybe you should think about how to do something that is mostly about the bark as subject for a serious piece...nice colors and contrast!

Marge Cline
09-05-2004, 04:54 PM
here's another tree. I discovered that water is very difficult to do in oil pastels, but I had to try anywayhttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Sep-2004/48361-birch_tree.jpg

Dyin
09-05-2004, 05:32 PM
another good tree, Marge. :) Water is best done with side by side strokes of different colors with a slight edge overlap...try that next time! You're doing great trees, I really like your distinct shadow side.

prestonsega
09-06-2004, 01:59 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Sep-2004/29946-fusseltree-op.jpg

This painting was done for the weekly sketch and a movie thread...Sue was kind enough to ask me to share how I went about producing this image here in the class room.....to be honest, due to the 2 hour time limit of the sketch thread, I wasn't really sure how I did it... now that I have had time to think about it. I can make some comments.


For me, it is important to remember that the tree trunk and branches are basically cylindar shapes. (bent, dented, tapered. etc, but they still follow the same basic principles of painting a soup can. Always keep in mind that to give the illusion of turning, you must have a minimum of three values...even in the shadow areas..(.there is a lot of power in the number 3 when it comes to art).

Another thing to remember about trees, they get more slender at they get taller....there are exceptions, such as in this tree there are knots, worn or damaged areas that make some lower areas thinner in diameter,

I approached this work the same as with the softies...laid in the darks of the trees and the shadows, followed by the middle tones which left my cream paper showing the lightest areas... for my darks I used black with purple blended over it , brown for my middle tree tone with light violet blended over it and and the lighter tan with light blue and or violet blended over it. The sunlit areas of the branches were a light yellow with a light grey blended on top, ( I think.. :) I then worked these colors back and forth to add more than three values keeping in mind the direction of the light source.

For the background foilage I have found that with ops laying in the light areas followed by the successive darker shades of blue and green are the only way to go,,,,,,in softies ,,,,,I tend to lay lights over darks.

There is no white in this painting. And if I go back into it I will kill down the black (a necessary evil due to my limited collection of ops ) and I would do some glazing of blues in the foilage to town down the yellow greens.

Not sure if it made sense, but the painting was a heck of a lot of fun to do! Thanks, Sue for inviting me to contribute :) !

Dyin
09-06-2004, 11:52 AM
thanks Preston! The great thing about this classroom is that we can learn from each other. The same technique doesn't work for everyone and it's nice to know there are other approaches. I don't think black is an evil thing, many landscape artists use it in moderation and it's not overpowering anywhere here. Appreciate you joining and sharing! :clap:

Biggles7268
09-06-2004, 06:35 PM
hehe I wasn't going to put any more of this one in here unless I finished it, but I don't think I want to go any further with it. Will most likely try a few new ones this week if I get the time.

Dyin
09-06-2004, 06:57 PM
aw, he was finding a nice little home :) Maybe you'll want to come back to it later. We'd love to see new ones, if you get the time.

cjkelly
09-06-2004, 09:50 PM
Marge: love the bark on your tree and it looks wonderfully 3D. :cool:

Preston: I could just walk up and hug that tree :D . It is so solid and expressive and I'm totally taken in by the colours you have used. Thanks for the how-to.

Biggles: I think your tree belongs in an enchanted forest with a unicorn underneath it. It's looks so lonely and desolate, but shining at the same time (if that makes sense :D )

cj

cjkelly
09-06-2004, 09:56 PM
cj...great tree! and a fantastic trunk it is...I had wondered if these were paper bark trees...they had these in south Florida...I loved that bark! Just layers of parchment! This would really pop majestically with a dark background, maybe you should think about how to do something that is mostly about the bark as subject for a serious piece...nice colors and contrast!

Thanks Sue.
Yes the bark is just like paper - and at a certain time of the year (may be early Summer but not sure) - it all peels off in thick strips that hang off the trunk and pile up underneath the tree. That's probably the best time to paint it because the inner layers are a vibrant rusty orange colour.
I agree, a dark background would look great - I've added your suggestion to my list of 'pics to do'. :D

cj

Biggles7268
09-07-2004, 08:01 AM
hehe thanks for the encouragment, it's mostly time constraints and the desire to try different types of trees that are making me think of leaving this one be. I suppose all those other trees will still be there later though lol.

prestonsega
09-07-2004, 03:45 PM
Biggles I think this is quite a nice composition,,,,has almost an orietal feel...interesting negative shapes..well done!

CJ...I soft effect the peeling bark has on the tree...bet they are pretty in person, also.....very nice painting.

Pat Isaac
09-10-2004, 04:31 PM
Here is my tree. I found the picture in the library and probably liked the color because I am from New England. You keep making me do landscapes :wink2: Who knows what will happen. This is on Sennelier La Carte paper sand and I used Sennelier and Holbein pastels. It is about 12x 18.

Pat

prestonsega
09-10-2004, 07:02 PM
Pat..I am so ready for fall that this painting just screamed taunting obscenities...Kind of like the trees in the Wizard of Oz. Our fall is late and short lived... :( ....beautiful colors.

Dyin
09-10-2004, 07:20 PM
yep, Pat, I'm a meanie that way! :evil: :p But geez, you do beautiful landscapes!!! I know you're terribly busy but sure would love to know in what order you laid down the color for the fir trees...you have a lovely loose style in your landscapes...you make it look so easy!!! :clap: :clap: :clap:

Pat Isaac
09-11-2004, 09:00 AM
Thanks Sue, :) Let's see, I put down the darkd side of the tree first and I used paynes grey, then I added the light side using blue grey and then I mixed in some red and green here and there. I added the dark branches and then the foliage. I started with the medium value of the foliage then added the darks and then the lights.
I also dicovered in talking to Sennelier that there are new colors out there. I haven't had to buy any for so long that I feel like I had my head in the sand. :o :( I'll have to get some as they sound wonderful.

Pat

stonewhiteclown
09-11-2004, 03:10 PM
Hi! You do great trees, people! I managed to start in time this month to join you :clap: Planning rules!

This is probably typical 'lolipop tree' though :D I done it from my own reference photo. Rather for warm up, going to do more. I love trees!

5x7" on gray Fabriano Tiziano.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/11-Sep-2004/30926-Image05198-tree01.jpg

Dyin
09-11-2004, 03:38 PM
I know lollipop lol! But since this is in a city setting it's bound to be that way from pruning. You have nice light and dark areas and I really love the ground shadows :clap: Am so glad you'll be doing more, that reference you gave me for this class was a great help to all of us, so thanks!

Marge Cline
09-11-2004, 06:42 PM
Pat. I'm with Preston...can hardly wait for fall to come and change the landscape. Your trees whet my appetite to do fall trees....maybe a trip to Wisconsin will be in order. Nice job. Marge Cline

Pat Isaac
09-11-2004, 07:03 PM
Lollipop trees??? :rolleyes:What do you mean? Your tree looks like many I see in urban areas around here. Good lights and darks. Looking forward to seeing more. The trees around here are starting to turn, especially north of here.

Pat

Dyin
09-11-2004, 07:32 PM
I do miss the trees in the fall back east...we get nice golds out here but I sure do miss those maple reds!

Biggles7268
09-12-2004, 02:12 AM
Great paintings :)

I spent about 5 minutes on this and just can't decide what else to do with it.

BigToe
09-12-2004, 02:14 AM
Thats a nice tree there, I like the light trickling down to light it :)

stonewhiteclown
09-12-2004, 03:06 AM
I spent about 5 minutes on this and just can't decide what else to do with it.

I think you need not to darken the area beneath the tree. It's distracting to me. Get it look more like it did on the previous shot :angel:

What else to do? Call it finished and do another one! :D This one is very nice btw!

stonewhiteclown
09-12-2004, 03:12 AM
Hi BigToe! :wave:
Are you into oil pastels? Come play with us :D

Biggles7268
09-12-2004, 06:01 AM
I think you need not to darken the area beneath the tree. It's distracting to me. Get it look more like it did on the previous shot :angel:

What else to do? Call it finished and do another one! :D This one is very nice btw!


lol I was attempting to put the trees shadow in, I agree with you though that it doesn't really look good. Thanks for the tip and the compliment

BT is a friend of mine, she's done some very good color pencil drawings but i haven't seen any OP's out of her yet. :D

eileenclaire
09-12-2004, 09:56 AM
I have to admire the lovely trees people have been posting here!

Biggles, I like the misty effect you've achieved with the background on this. I think your tree has a lot of character!

BT, I've worked with colored pencils, but found I could work a lot faster with oil pastels. Give them a try, you can combine them with your colored pencils. :)

Pat Isaac
09-12-2004, 10:17 AM
Biggles - I just love the atmospheric quality you have achieved in this piece.

BT-I have done some colored pencil and admire people who can stick with them. They do work well with oil pastel.
Pat

Kathryn Wilson
09-12-2004, 12:55 PM
Thats a nice tree there, I like the light trickling down to light it :)

Hi BigToe, Welcome to the Oil Pastel forum! Come post with us if you are working in oil pastels, or if I can direct you to another forum that is more appropriate let me know.

Kathryn Wilson
09-12-2004, 12:58 PM
Just peeking in on all these wonderful trees - with Sue being gone for a few days, Eileen generously offered to help out, but if I can help in any way too, let me know. Things can get busy so holler real loud - :wave:

greenpearl
09-13-2004, 12:37 AM
My goodness, you don't pay attention for a week or so, and before you know it there are trees popping up all over the place. Great work, everyone: Biggles (I bet you're dreaming about that tree by now!), Becky, AB, Marge, CJ (I adore paperbarks - just love squishing against the bark on the tree - it's like foam), CJ, Preston, Pat, Alex! Hope I didn't forget anyone - (please excuse for not commenting on every individual entry - would practically need a day to do that :) they're all excellent trees! :clap: :clap: :clap:

Dyin
09-15-2004, 05:36 PM
I'm back! Thanks to Eileen and Kat for keeping an eye here... :clap:
Hi BT...hope you'll try the OPs, I have a set of Prismacolors that I got 14 years ago and still use, but mostly as sketch tools now. You might like using the two together.
We still have a couple weeks to play with trees, am looking forward to more :D

stonewhiteclown
09-15-2004, 05:47 PM
I'm back!
Hooray! :clap: Where's your story? :evil: We exchange for more trees :D

Dyin
09-15-2004, 06:31 PM
lol...bribery! Well, if you'll give me an apple I'll tell :evil: really, not much to tell...we won't be moving to Reno...we grew up in cities but love country more now. Northern Nevada is one huge mountain range...hardly any people or towns for 500 miles and hardly anything taller than a jackrabbit grows there. A lot of mining operations though. Saw a couple coyotes cross the interstate safely...Reno is a fair sized city with lots of casinos. We went to the Nevada side of Lake Tahoe. It was a very pretty alpine lake and quite large...it's very high up so we finally got to see some trees. Lots of road construction so no place to really stop and explore. We did see a house on the interstate in the middle of nowhere that they'd turned into personal art. It had a huge log frame dome built over it (heaven knows where they got trees) and personal sculptures everywhere...wanted a pic but was a dust storm blowing and wouldn't come out.
So folks...let's paint some trees and dedicate them to the poor treeless mountains in Nevada...even at 8,000 elevation there were none!!!!

Pat Isaac
09-15-2004, 07:26 PM
Okay, Sue. Doesn't sound like you were impressed. I read a or of mystery novels and one of the authors I like is Perry O'Shaughnesy. All her novels take place around Lake Tahoe. Glad you are back.

Pat

Dyin
09-16-2004, 12:24 AM
Okay, Sue. Doesn't sound like you were impressed. I read a or of mystery novels and one of the authors I like is Perry O'Shaughnesy. All her novels take place around Lake Tahoe. Glad you are back.

Pat

Tahoe was pretty and thinking that I didn't get to see the California side either...only a quarter of the lake. But once you come down from the mountain it's high desert just like here. Do you like Tony Hillerman? Same thing, not all of 4 corners is pretty but once you find the good spots you forget the rest :) I didn't get a chance to see that much. I'm glad I'm back and I missed you too!

steven
09-16-2004, 08:17 AM
My contribution to the tree collection - A row of poplars in contre-jour :) Based on some plein-air watercolours I did a couple of weeks back (you can find them here - http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=216625 ).

Done on W&N 90 lb/190 gsm NOT/CP (10 x 14 inches), on a loose watercolour background; Sennelier OPs

C&C welcome of course!

Enjoy! :cool:

stonewhiteclown
09-16-2004, 03:30 PM
Steven, this cannot be mistaken - I see poplar trees! I like how paper texture improve the look of foliage. This effect is important I think. Poplars' leaves are coloured very differently on two sides and it gives the shimmering in the foliage volume.

Steven, how could you forget to convert the image to jpeg format :crying: The file is 600KB and that's baaaad.

steven
09-16-2004, 03:56 PM
Steven, this cannot be mistaken - I see poplar trees! I like how paper texture improve the look of foliage. This effect is important I think. Poplars' leaves are coloured very differently on two sides and it gives the shimmering in the foliage volume.

Steven, how could you forget to convert the image to jpeg format :crying: The file is 600KB and that's baaaad.

:crying: I'm sorry, Alex - bad mistake by me (and I did the same at the watercolour forum) - I have attached the picture here again in jpeg format. Hope this helps :)

Yes, I know what you mean about poplar tree folliage, some are almost white/silvery on the underside. :cool:

Thanks for looking and commenting! :wave:

Dyin
09-16-2004, 04:19 PM
Steven, thanks for joining in! Yes, I knew the poplars immediately...and would know it was yours immediately. I luckily have cable and didn't realize how big the file was and it's better as an attachment. Do poplars have a special meaning for you? They are in a lot of your work. I'm glad to see work like this too, it shows that there are many approaches to creating trees, not only realistic...thanks! :clap:

Biggles7268
09-16-2004, 04:39 PM
Steven those look great, good job :clap:

that 600kb file nearly killed my dial up, I could hear my modem choking on it :)

steven
09-16-2004, 04:52 PM
Hi Dyin! Glad to contribute :) Thanks for the neat comments and observations ;)

I always liked poplars, and in Belgium (especially Flanders) they are a characteristic tree (together with the pollard-willow) lining fields, roads, brooks, etc. Like the way they stand guard and the rustle of their foliage in the wind. We have a species called Populus tremula - ratelpopulier (in English it would literaly translate as rattle poplar - I think that is what you guys refer to as aspen poplar). Another species is Populus alba - witte abeel, in English white poplar, characterized by foliage which is green on the upperside, and whitish on the underside (I think this is the type Alex has in mind in his post above).
I did use them in a few previous paintings, yes, and didn't want to miss the chance to do them plein air when I had a chance ;)

steven
09-16-2004, 05:07 PM
Steven those look great, good job :clap:

that 600kb file nearly killed my dial up, I could hear my modem choking on it :)

Woops, nearly missed you there - posting at same time :p

My apologies again (though as attachment it's probably worth the wait :wink2: )- won't do it again, promissed! :D

Thanks for the nice comment! Glad you liked them! :)

Pat Isaac
09-16-2004, 05:22 PM
Steven - So glad that I was able to see your poplars. The first time I waited and waited for the download. I have dial-up. I haven't seen them for a long time. It seems as if I used to see them a lot as a child, but seems they have died out here or nobody plants them anymore. I like the texture the paper gives.

Came back again. :)
Pat

steven
09-16-2004, 05:37 PM
Thanks for the patience, Pat! ;) Glad you enjoyed them!

Judging by all the reactions I should do some more POPs (Poplar Oil Pastels) :D

Dyin
09-16-2004, 06:32 PM
oh no! I responded to this then must have had a 'doh!' moment and never submitted! I'm really glad you joined in on this and yes, was wondering if poplars had a special significance to you since you use them in much of your work. Luckily I have high speed so didn't notice a very long wait, the attachment works much better though. :) I like your shadows in this and glad that people see the many ways to create trees...thanks!

Pat Isaac
09-18-2004, 09:53 AM
I started another tree and right now it is a work in progress. Hope to have it finished next week. I am having fun with the trees, Sue :D

This will be a fall tree.

Pat

Dyin
09-18-2004, 10:01 AM
Pat...I'm glad you're starting to have fun...you've always said landscapes didn't 'do' anything for you personally but boy...you've got the touch. And if it's fun maybe we'll see some more! The trunk is magnifico :D Did you underpaint this? Can't wait to see more. :clap:

Pat Isaac
09-18-2004, 10:39 AM
Actually, I have always like trees. As a kid I can remember drawing them constantly. I didn't underpaint. It is on Sennelier La Carte paper which I think is sand color. I usually like to work on a colored ground. :) I took this picture from the tree library on WC.

Pat

Biggles7268
09-18-2004, 07:08 PM
well I was about to start on another tree, but my paper seems to be occupied. It's somewhere in that mess underneath the cat.

Pat Isaac
09-19-2004, 10:51 AM
:D :D :D Hahahahaha.....that is too funny. Draw the cat :cat: :cat: :cat:

Pat

Dyin
09-19-2004, 11:40 AM
boy, the excuses you people come up with! :p :cat:

stonewhiteclown
09-22-2004, 05:36 PM
Pat, can't wait for you to finish your Autumn tree. Its lower part already looks great. You also somehow manage to do some amazing effects on the ground, like in your previous tree picture. Looks easy and simple, but gosh, how effective! You do those bold strokes with a side of a stick, right?

Sue, I did another little tree picture which I'll scan and post tomorrow. Again something not very complicated. But after that I think I'm going to do one bigger tree, one nice tree with branches and lighting and maybe roots. At least Pat is painting tree with roots :)

cjkelly
09-22-2004, 06:06 PM
Lots of great trees everyone! :clap:
You have all inspired me to have another go.

These trees are in our front yard and I've wondered constantly how to do the fine pine needles without getting too fussy. They are quite intimidating!
I took note of the advice "less is more" and I hope I've captured the general shape of the pines OK.
The white trees behind are gum trees in the late afternoon sun.

Acrylic underpainting on 11 x 14" canvas board using my new Senneliers (woohoo! finally arrived after a 9 week wait!!) and CD'A's.

cj

Pat Isaac
09-22-2004, 06:29 PM
Alex, I hope to be able to post the finished tree on Friday, but certainly by the beginning of next week. I only use the side of the pastel to put in the general color then I use the tip after that.

CJ - nice pines. You are right less is better. I try to remember that, but not always.

Pat

Dyin
09-22-2004, 06:32 PM
Alex...I look forward to seeing your little tree and am glad you want to jump into another right away! It's wonderful how we all inspire each other :clap:

cj...have missed you! I would have know these were Australian pines right away....had them all over when we lived in Florida. You definately caught the shape just right...and without all the little needles! :clap: I do wonder if a little blue or violet on the gum tree trunks would set them behind just a touch more. Love the z composition you have going there. And thanks for the detail, I really love to see the textures and that's always lost in the full jpegs.
How do you like those Senneliers???? :D

stonewhiteclown
09-23-2004, 06:01 AM
cj, was it plein aire? I like their airy quality and pattern of branches. I see what Sue means, white trunks are reluctant to recede.


Here's my picture of evergreen. I'm not good at names, I think it's a spruce.
4.5x8" on pale blue Fabriano Tiziano
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/23-Sep-2004/30926-classroom_evergreen.jpg

Dyin
09-23-2004, 12:40 PM
Alex...that's a GREAT blue spruce!! Nice shadow areas and the direction of the branches are just right. Perhaps the bottom should be a touch more scraggly looking but I'm wanting to pick this one for my Christmas tree :) Your other trees are good too. :clap:

Pat Isaac
09-23-2004, 04:28 PM
Alex, this is a great blue spruce! Atmospherically, it even reminds me a little of winter and Christmas is coming.......

Pat

Dark_Shades
09-23-2004, 05:34 PM
..... Excellent Sue..... as you know am one also to struggle with landscapes... greens... foliage..... so this is wonderful to come across...... not had time to read it all and the links, but have got it ear marked for the weekend :) ...... thanks for sharing ..... I am sure I will find this all very useful and helpful.. :clap:

Dyin
09-23-2004, 07:25 PM
Hey Dawn...nice to see ya over here. I'm not sure it works the same with the softies, but the links should help a lot and I remember that Maggie Price had a really neat demo on trees for softies you might want to find. I tried doing it that way and it didn't work so well for the oilies. I think of you every time I reach for a green lol! Thanks again for coming by!

cjkelly
09-23-2004, 07:30 PM
Thanks Pat, Sue and Alex.
I LOVE those Senneliers :D Worth the wait. I even managed to pick up a few loose sticks from an art supplier during a recent trip to Brisbane, a few of my favourite earth tones and doubles of colours I know I'm going to use a lot of.
Summer heat will make things interesting though ... lol.
I've also ordered a set of 12 Shiva Oil Bars for my birthday :evil:

Alex, plein aire is a bit difficult at the moment as it's cane harvesting season and there's lots of machinery roaring past raising clouds of dust all day (and into the night) - there's actually three roads in the pic but I've played them down a bit. It's a ref pic I took in quiter times.... :)
I like your spruce - definitely Christmassy!

cj

sexkitten
09-23-2004, 07:47 PM
well I was about to start on another tree, but my paper seems to be occupied. It's somewhere in that mess underneath the cat.

Sleeping cats can be treated as forklift pallets. Stick your hand under it, lift up gently, grab the materials under cat which you need, and gently lower the cat.

Most cats give you a grumpy half asleep look, or get up and move onto another pile of stuff that you need to get to.

Dyin
09-24-2004, 10:29 AM
cj....I'm testing out the Shiva oilstiks...we'll have to compare notes!

Pat Isaac
09-25-2004, 04:46 PM
Here is another update to the big tree. I realized that I needed to put in the background before I put in all the leaves. :eek: Now I have to deal with all the leaves and some more branches. Then I will be done. :D I have really enjoyed doing this tree and now that the portraait is finished I can concentrate on other things.

Pat

Harm Verbeek
09-25-2004, 05:02 PM
Hello

A lot of nice trees. Good to see how many ways you can make a tree.
I've made my contribution too.
This I made with a picture of an old eatable chestnutree I saw when I was in France. I don't know how you call that in english.
I miss something in this tree, but I can't find out what? It ain't the chestnuts, I was there in june. :wink2:

Dyin
09-25-2004, 06:12 PM
Pat...those branches are so impressive...I'm trying to figure out how you accomplished the receding effect on the right trunk without any blues I can see...can't wait to see more!

Harm...wow...now that's a fat tree trunk...very impressive. The only thing I can think that might be missing is the shadow on the dark side of the trunk itself. I assume this is a tree that was cut and sprouted new branches, otherwise the center of the tree wouldn't show sky holes. Great job and so glad you joined us!

Pat Isaac
09-25-2004, 07:05 PM
Actually, there are some blues, but you can't always see everything in these digi pics.

Harm, that is a great tree. The only thing I think you might miss are more branches. Were there more??

Pat

stonewhiteclown
09-26-2004, 10:07 AM
Pat, that far background is to die for, nothing less! This piece is going to be a HUGE success!

Harm, I believe it looks like an old tree with some big branches lost times ago. What may be wrong with it... The leaves usually grow on thinner branches, not along the greater ones, but at the distance on the sides.

Pat Isaac
09-26-2004, 10:17 AM
Thanks, Alex. I hope to finish it tomorrow. I used a lot of the new sennelier colors in the background.....they are soooo nice.

Pat

Harm Verbeek
09-26-2004, 12:31 PM
Hello everybody,

The tree is indeed broken off and old. The picture i used as reference is here.
I'll take the remarks with this drawing and show how it worked.

Dyin
09-26-2004, 01:03 PM
Pat...yeah, not surprised that all the colors don't come through, but the effect is sure there!

Harm...you really did get the tree's personality, perhaps it's because it's a little squeezed onto the paper that you feel something is missing, the middle leaf spread would probably go off the page somewhat. You did well using blue to recede the center inside area of the trunk. Next time you try one, try to go for a little more dark contrast in the leaves, remember how you made the rocks come forward on your seascape by putting more contrast there? It's the same sort of principle. Dark areas make light areas 'pop'.

Pat Isaac
09-26-2004, 04:19 PM
Wow, what a wonderful old tree. You certainly have it's character. Actually, you could probably use more foliage, but it is a great tree!!!

Pat

Harm Verbeek
09-26-2004, 06:03 PM
Hello,

What is foliage?

stonewhiteclown
09-26-2004, 06:36 PM
What is foliage?
The leaves referred as a whole. Thanks for showing us the tree, it's magnificent!

Pat Isaac
09-30-2004, 03:38 PM
Whew.. :D Just under the wire. Here is my fall tree. I need to pull it out to the edges a little more, but I think it's done. The bark is what intrigued me with this pic. :)

Pat

steven
09-30-2004, 05:01 PM
:cool: I think this calls for a couple of close-ups, Pat! Love the play of light on the bark, as well as the mossy regions :)

Pat Isaac
09-30-2004, 05:05 PM
Okay, Steven. I'll take some close ups tomorrow and post them. I assume you want close ups of the bark??? :wave:

Pat

Dyin
09-30-2004, 06:54 PM
Pat, your tree is magnificent!!! I can't wait to see the closeups. I'm going to post the new classroom but this will stay stickied til Carly gets back, so please do post the closeups!!! What size is this and what paper did you use??

Pat Isaac
09-30-2004, 09:50 PM
Thanks, Sue. This is about 12"x18" on Sennelier LaCarte, and I think the color is sand. I used Holbeins and Senneliers - a lot of those delicioius new Sennelier colors. :D I'll post the close-ups tomorrow.

pat

naturegirl
10-01-2004, 12:04 AM
Wow, I'm so inspired by these beautiful paintings! Here's my not-so-great addition to the OP Sept Classroom. It's a mix of OPs (Sennelier, Van Gogh, etc) on gray Canson Mi-Tientes, about 7" x 8". I did it partially during my lunch break at work, and partially from a photo later on at home. I realized I don't particularly like this paper (too smooth), so it was a bit frustrating -- but I learned something, and that's the important part!

Jen

Dyin
10-01-2004, 12:53 AM
Jen, I'm so glad you were inspired. You did it so quickly and it's lovely. I can't work on most smooth papers so can understand the frustration. I really like the sense of size this has, it just reads 'big tree' lol! Have you tried Art Spectrum? I think it lends itself to almost any OP work, though it does use them up a little bit quicker, it's well worth it. Thanks for joining in! :clap:

Pat Isaac
10-01-2004, 03:19 PM
Jen, this is a great tree. I can't believe you did it so fast :) I don't like smooth papers either as I feel the OP is just sliding around. I really like the new colorfix paper that is our there now. Try some. It has a little tooth and comes in many colors.

Pat

Pat Isaac
10-01-2004, 03:24 PM
Okay, here are the closeups that I promised. :wave:
Pat

naturegirl
10-01-2004, 10:19 PM
Pat, that is truly a beautiful painting! If I came across it in a gallery or show, I would seriously consider buying it. I think it's great!

Did you use Colorfix paper? What size is the finished piece? I was in Dick Blick earlier today looking at their pastel paper selection and couldn't choose between Colorfix & Wallis. Is there a distinct difference between the two?

Jen

Dyin
10-01-2004, 11:33 PM
Pat, I can't believe how those squiggles turned into great leaves lol! I'm in love with the first closeup of the trunk though...it reminds me of the texture on my turtle, but you did it so much faster! Do you actually put little dots in there or do you let it skip over the texture of the art spectrum?

Pat Isaac
10-02-2004, 08:32 AM
Thanks, Jen and Sue. Actually I used Sennelier LaCarte paper, sand color (I think). I have some of this paper I want to use up as I have now fallen in love with Colorfix and Wallis. Wallis paper comes in 2 grades - museum and professional. Museum grade is only in white and Begian mist and the pro grade had a grey. This paper takes a ton of abuse without the surface being compromised. The colorfix paper has a similar surface but it comes in various colors. I'm not sure that it takes as much abuse. Depends on whether you want to work with a colored background. However, you can put a wash on the Wallis. It will take anything from water to turps.

Sue, I did exactly that. Let the color skip over the texture.

Pat

stonewhiteclown
10-04-2004, 06:05 AM
Pat, that's as gorgeous as it can be and than slightly more! :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: Very bold conclusion to this classroom! Thanks for the closeups, very interesting how you achieved particular effects in the bark and foliage! I can see how little of black helped to convey strong lighting.

Jen, nice job! Like the branches and especially lighting! I'm great believer in working on location, albeit mostly theoretical so far :D

Pat Isaac
10-04-2004, 08:57 AM
Thanks, Alex. I didn't use black, however. Never use it actually.

Now on to skin tones.

Pat

stonewhiteclown
10-04-2004, 09:52 AM
Thanks, Alex. I didn't use black, however. Never use it actually.
Sorry, hard to tell from the monitor. Who ever needs black with those darks.

Pat Isaac
10-04-2004, 03:38 PM
Alex - One of the colors that I use for extra dark darks is Sennelier sepia. Great color. and I threw in some ultra blue.

Pat

sexkitten
10-04-2004, 04:29 PM
Two trees.

The first one is a banyan tree that I did on Saturday, the second is a generic tree that I did at the beginning of the month but forgot to post.

Dyin
10-04-2004, 06:26 PM
Thank you for joining in! I really like the ghostly look of the banyon tree :D

Pat Isaac
10-04-2004, 06:34 PM
Banyon trees are awesome. I have a friend who does them frequently and they are just so eerie.

Pat

sexkitten
10-04-2004, 06:46 PM
Thanks, Sue! Good to be back!

I *love* Banyan trees... its one of the many things I miss about Hawaii. I'm sure they aren't native flora, but they were in all the parks and the zoo. They are an amazing one tree playground. :D

Biggles7268
10-05-2004, 07:25 PM
Very nice Kitty, I love that Banyan tree

Dyin
10-05-2004, 07:50 PM
hey biggles...haven't seen you for awhile :wave: hope you'll be back joining in again!