PDA

View Full Version : Brush Brand, favorites and why.


Silent Jaguar
08-29-2004, 01:33 AM
I'm looking for opinions on Acrylic Brush Brands. I live about 150 miles away from an actual art store. Thus, have no way of testing the brushes and have to rely on my knowlege and experience while purchasing brushes online. I realize brushes are varied for different techniques, however, your thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
My preferences are: No visible brush strokes, able to glaze, the brush has to be medium (not too hard or too soft) and very durable.
Thank you for your time.

Mike Finn
08-29-2004, 01:52 AM
Anawanita..

Firstly let me say I am a beginner...

I was using Golden Nylon and Taklon brushes and still do BUT I purchased 4 interlocked hog bristle brushes recently and SUDDENLY my painting has improved... my opinion only :) I am NOT trying to hide the strokes 'cause I like to see them and I haven't got to glazing as yet but NOW I can put onto canvas what I visualize..... Just thought I'd mention it.

Mike Finn

Silent Jaguar
08-29-2004, 02:04 AM
Do you know the brand name, I don't think it's illegal to mention in these forums.

Mike Finn
08-29-2004, 02:19 AM
Do you know the brand name, I don't think it's illegal to mention in these forums.

Sure do... "Art Spectrum", filberts, I'll get a couple of large flats soon. Long handles, clean up easily and hold much more paint than the synthetics. Here's a link to Dick Blick to peruse ..
http://www.dickblick.com/zz052/24/products.asp?param=0&ig_id=425

Mike Finn

quinacridonemagenta
08-29-2004, 06:00 AM
Jack Richeson series 7530, i use the size 12 flat only.

i LOVE my brush because.....i've had it for well over four years and it is still in excellent shape. the handle shows a lot of wear, but so what....its the bristles that count. this brush can still give me a precise razor edge line on its tips. i have even scrumbled with this brush, and it just bounces back.

i've never seen a brush like it. i've been on a quest to find another one for about a year and hopefully have found a source from the Richeson company to a place about six hours from here. its a little more pricey than other acrylics, but no other brush other than purdee's (i use them for murals) have every stood up like this one.

i do stress that meticulous care of brushes and especially excellent brush washing is essential to having a brush keep its quality.

Bioartist
08-29-2004, 08:05 AM
Asking this question to the wonderful people of WC will give you a different type of brush for every response you recieve :wink2: . So on that note, heres my two cents worth:
Winsor and Newtons Galeria. I only own a filbert (#8) and a round (#8), but they are fantastic. No brush marks, heaps of spring, but not still or floppy when wet, and they hold a lot of paint.
Otherwise the art spectrum hog hairs are great for more expressive work (I only own one of them, and also in a size 8).
Hope this helps
Stacey

Artguy29
08-29-2004, 10:17 AM
Anawanita,

I use Loew-Cornell brushes (flat #'s 1-12, 3/4",1/4",1/2", and a few other types) as well as some Princeton Art & Brush Co. (angular 1/2",1/4",round no. 4,8) and Windsor and Newton (round no. 4,8). I also use some other brushes that I have colllected over the years. The brushes I stated above are excellent quality. They are great for a varity of apllications, including glazing (as you said) as well as heavy painting. Just another thought,

Dave

Silent Jaguar
08-29-2004, 01:04 PM
Jack Richeson series 7530, i use the size 12 flat only.
You paint all those beautiful works with just one brush!??? I'm impressed.

quinacridonemagenta
08-29-2004, 02:26 PM
thanks Silent Jaguar,
the majority of my work in the last year has been done through a pouring process and then my brush is mainly for accenting it. i just am very used to this one brush and it is truly an extension of my own hand. i do have a small round for signing and a filbert for softening edges sometimes....those are both cheap little $2.00 jobbies (i think the brand is softgrip - which actually for the money, produces an EXCELLENT brush).

by the way, the Richeson i use is similar in content and feel to the Galeria brushes, but i found that my painting style was too hard on the Gal's. i do have a large box of brushes filled with ones that just couldn't hold their own....quite a few Galleria's and Princeton's in there. i found that they would lose their sharpness or "split" in various places and i can't stand that. i don't know why i've saved them all....i've probably got every brush i've ever owned in there....i do pull them out for mural work.

i do think that i really want to try this Art Sprectrum brush that's been mentioned a couple of times here. the link provided goes to Dick Blick's MasterStroke brand....is that the Art Spectrum being referred to?

sassybird
08-29-2004, 07:08 PM
I can not even tell you what my brushes are. I have had them over 35 years, and the paint on the handles are all rubbed off from use. They were the best boar bristly brushes i could find at the time, and have lasted me all this time:)

Mike Finn
08-29-2004, 07:30 PM
i do think that i really want to try this Art Sprectrum brush that's been mentioned a couple of times here. the link provided goes to Dick Blick's MasterStroke brand....is that the Art Spectrum being referred to?

I think "Art Spectrum" is an Australian brand and I can't find a link that actually shows the brush but here's a quote from "Art Supplies Online NZ" that is my supplier....

"Art Spectrum Series 2000 Ultimate Quality Chungking Bristle....

HAIR TYPE: Finest interlocked Chungking bristle. Long, muted deep green handles with copper coated seamless brass ferrules create a brush of distinction. Made by master craftsmen and regarded as the ultimate in artists quality bristle brushes. Excellent flag, interlocked bristles and an extremely generous fill make these brushes a must for the discerning artist. They provide wonderful control, paint carrying capacity, spring and longevity. Series 2000 brushes are a joy to use and when cared for properly will outlast other bristle brushes, making them no more expensive in the long run. Available in Rounds, Flats and Filberts."

Mike Finn

Lady Carol
08-29-2004, 10:52 PM
I have these really cheap brushes I bought for $4 for 6 (different sizes). They don't have the names on them and I think the name was on the original packet. Well they are the best. I have almost worn one completely away and as I can't remember where I got it from, I doubt it can be replaced.

To some degree brand liking is personal preference and the bottom line is that you just have to buy and try some. At least give both bristle and soft brushes a go.

Richard Saylor
08-30-2004, 12:46 AM
I've started painting acrylics horizontal on a table top rather than vertical on an easel, and I find short-handled watercolor brushes to be more convenient for this. For me, Robert Simmons Sapphire brushes (a mixture of sable and synthetic) seem to work very well for smooth effects in acrylics. They are more durable than sable and work very well for glazing.