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AFM159
08-13-2004, 10:18 AM
Ok - figured I better post something - lest ya'll start to think I don't do anything................

This is an illustration of a concept for a branch bank. The brown spot on the wall to the upper left is a blurred out logo. I figured it's best to keep such identifying marks to a minimum.

Done on a half sheet of wc paper. Pen & Ink with Fluid Acrylics.

All comments, good or bad, are welcome.

AFM159
08-13-2004, 10:19 AM
Here are a few detail shots.

roger41
08-13-2004, 10:36 AM
Wow!! I really like just about everything in this rendering....the wet parking lot, the large glass windows, and the clouds..are just amazing! I bet whoever you rendered this for was pleased.....if not, then they need to have their heads examined :D :D ....Iv'e seen some of your work before when you first joined WC I think........it's really amazing :clap: :clap: please show some more..........I love these types of renderings :D

designbyjen
08-14-2004, 08:31 AM
i really like that you've made the style your 'own'. the stippling in the clouds is so unique & pulls the whole thing together, integrating the ink w/ the h20color.
if anything...i'm not hot on the amount of puddles...it's just a picky 'less is more' thing for me. but that's just 'jen' for ya (fuss'in & poop'in-ha)
great work!
~~~jen

TedDawson
08-14-2004, 10:17 AM
Y'know, as I look at this, it reminds me of something that I often do wrong since starting watercolors... something that seems to be common among a lot of artists. We don't pay enough attention to the important prelimary aspects of composition and contrast. Your architectural drawings always seem to demonstrate these well. I'm finding that the more time I spend on what I do before I paint, the less work I actually have to do when it comes to actually applying paint. Should be a no-brainer, of course, but I'm very impatient and have been thinking Since I'm learning to paint, I'm going to concentrate only on paint technique. It's probably one of the reasons I mess up a lot and get frustrated so often. And although it's something one can streamline as he or she becomes more adept, it just makes me think that most of all of our problems as artists could be solved if we just did more prelimary sketches and studies.

At any rate, I like this. Your architectural drawings seem to hold onto a certain level of spontaneity which enhances them. And you can do clouds! An enviable skill anywhere.

Kathryn Wilson
08-16-2004, 12:05 PM
Excellent rendering! Thanks for posting the close-ups - I would have missed seeing the stippling in the clouds.

Not having worked in acrylics in a very long time - what is fluid acrylic??

LarrySeiler
08-16-2004, 02:19 PM
like the structure and work done overall...but agree with the less is more comment concerning the foreground. I feel the values are too dark, and the snake like presence too commanding of attention that takes away from the structure itself. Just how it feels to me...

Larry

AFM159
08-16-2004, 03:34 PM
Thank you all for your comments!

Larry & Jen - I agree about the forground. This one didn't come off quite like I had intended. Ooops.

Interesting that several of you liked the stippling in the clouds. I figured I would get more crits for that than anything else. "what are all those dots for, in the clouds, dummy? don't ya know clouds ain't like that?" :evil:

One of the things I always struggle with is: "how much to ink?" Often times my work has to do double and tripple duty. The same piece will end up on marketing materials, flyers, jobsite signage, ocassionally a billboard, and on cover sheets for bluebrints. Trying to get any one piece of artwork to satisfy all those requirements is difficult (at least for me).

If a piece is to end up on a black and white flyer, in the real estate section of the newspaper, or on a set of blue prints, then it needs to stand alone as a complete pen & ink. OTOH, if it is not, then the amount of ink detail can be cut back, and the color portion can carry the bulk load.

Both the foreground and the background clouds were born of this need to have this piece work first as a black and white line drawing then as a colored rendering. The background worked, the foreground, not so much. To stylized.

Also, many times, when doing Architectural Illustrations, there is no foreground to workwith. Just an expanse of parking lot. So if I can set up a reflection or shadows then I can get more depth and improve the overall piece.

And as Ted stated this is where preliminaries would help. This one was done at a time when I was so busy that I could not take the time to develop preliminary studies and suffered for it in that regard.

Your architectural drawings seem to hold onto a certain level of spontaneity which enhances them.

Thanks Ted for the kind words. That is something I strive for. It's real easy to get caught in the technical aspects of this type of work and lose all spontaneity. Took me a long time to learn that. Much of my early work is way too sterile.


Not having worked in acrylics in a very long time - what is fluid acrylic??

Kyle - fluid acrylics are thinner than tube acrylics. The same work can be done with tube acrylics but you have to thin them so much with water that you lose much of the pigment strength. The acrylic binder for fluid acrylics is about the consistency of heavy cream. I have found that they are easier and faster to use when working in a watercolor style. I use Golden, Liquitex makes 'em too.

TedDawson
08-16-2004, 06:00 PM
And as Ted stated this is where preliminaries would help. This one was done at a time when I was so busy that I could not take the time to develop preliminary studies and suffered for it in that regard.

Hey, now, make sure you understand I didn't say YOU needed to do some prelims on this! I was thinking it's a good example of planning out a drawing. Sorry if it came across otherwise. I'M the one who needs to work on this.

I don't think everyone needs to do studies each and every time... unless you're regularly doing commissions for Italian chapels and portraits for millionaires. They almost always help, but as I've seen with a lot of folks who've posted their work here, once you've knocked out a few hundred pieces of work you can pretty much do most of it in your head. I got that way with comic strips, but with anything new it's always back to the basics.

I've seen the stuff Norman Rockwell used to take out in the backyard and burn, and then go do his Real painting. His studies were better than just about anybody else's finished work.

Which touches on another thing... I've noticed that a lot of painters and illustrators, including myself, don't always know how to finish a piece of work. Whether you finish loosely or tightly, that's so important. Jason's pic of Kerry and Edwards is a perfect example of both of these things... painting straight out without a sketch and producing a beautifully finished piece.

My wife is always coming up behind me saying, "Stop! Stop! Don't do anymore to it! It looks great!" Because she's seen me too many times go further than I should and then BOOM, it's a gift for the garbage man. A reason to go to acrylics or oils, methinks.

AFM159
08-17-2004, 03:31 PM
Hey, now, make sure you understand I didn't say YOU needed to do some prelims on this! I was thinking it's a good example of planning out a drawing. Sorry if it came across otherwise. I'M the one who needs to work on this.

Nor did I mean to imply that you were implying that I need to. Your right, for the most part, with this type of work I can most often do it in my head. I've done way to many to have to do prelims on each and every one, nor do I have the time. And the more I have thought about this one in particular, I don't think a prelim would have caught that. These were finishing marks. Things you wouldn't have seen in a prelim.

Also we're talking semantics for the most part. This is (IMHO) a minor detail in an otherwise strong rendering. But, this is what I like about posting here. I have not been able to get this kind of discussion and insight anywhere else!