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BioImage
08-09-2004, 10:17 AM
These are my very first attempts at riveting caps onto beads. The caps are punched from sheet metal, shaped with a dapping block and then riveted into place with silver tubing. The left bead is done with a brass cap, the right one is silver. I'm a tool junkie so it took Camille moments and moments to convince me to get a bunch of new tools to do this. Now I need a bigger workshop, too....

Robert

Dichroqueen
08-09-2004, 11:04 AM
These are great! I especially like the silver capped one.Do you have a website?

Patti
www.pattiwhiteley.com

BioImage
08-09-2004, 11:12 AM
[QUOTE=Dichroqueen]These are great! I especially like the silver capped one.Do you have a website?

Thanks very much. I keep promising myself that I'll get a website together but so far I haven't had time to do it. It is, however, approaching the top of my 'to do' list - on page one at least.

robert

CharleneN
08-09-2004, 11:13 AM
Robert,

Those are really awesome! :clap: :clap: I want to try that at some point also but have so much going on right now I have put it on the back burner. Can you list some tools that you found indispensible to the process? That would be much appreciated.

Thanks so much!

BioImage
08-09-2004, 12:20 PM
You'll need a moderate collection of tools to do this. We bought a dapping set made by Pepe Tools that has the large block and punches that match up. A punch cutter is needed to cut the disks and a Foredom tool is great for drilling and polishing. After that you may already have most of the stuff in your shop/studio: a couple of awls, a small vise, small anvil, hammers, jewelers saw, sandpaper (400 and up), metal polish. I made a bead block in my wood shop. I think that's most of the list. It can be a significant investment in tools depending on what you already have in your kit.

Thanks much,

Robert

CharleneN
08-09-2004, 01:43 PM
Thanks for sharing Robert. It is much appreciated!

dogmaw
08-09-2004, 08:37 PM
Robert,

Those are great, much nicer than my attempts! I am still having trouble breaking hollow beads when I try this. *sigh* I guess I'm just too rough with them.

Jo

dread
08-09-2004, 09:55 PM
Excellent !!!! Great work - I really want to do this too - have all the tools just dont have time !
Green with envy !

BioImage
08-10-2004, 09:45 AM
Robert,

Those are great, much nicer than my attempts! I am still having trouble breaking hollow beads when I try this. *sigh* I guess I'm just too rough with them.

Jo

Gently, gently. The metal goes where you want it to if you don't rush it. I use a small chasing hammer - so far, so good.

Thanks,

Robert

cankeep
08-10-2004, 11:21 AM
Robert those are awesome! Very professional looking and for your first try! Amazing!
You give me the courage to finally take the plunge and try it myself! I've bought all the tools but have one question....what thickness of sheet do you use for disks?

BioImage
08-10-2004, 11:48 AM
You can use 24 or 26 ga. I believe that 24 is preferred by many people but my supplier was out when I bought our stuff, so we used 26 and it does OK. The brass-capped bead was done on a 1/8 mandrel and the silver-organic was on a 3/32, so we got 2 different sizes of silver tubing to snugly fit the holes in the beads.

Robert

lckombi
08-11-2004, 12:26 AM
Beautiful Beads!!

Can you tell me what size tubing you bought and where you bought it. I love the look and want to try this.
Thanks
Laurie

mothergoose
08-11-2004, 02:05 AM
WOW Robert!!! Those are GREAT!!!! :clap: :clap:

Keep up the great work!!
I have GOT to learn how to do that....

Kim

BioImage
08-11-2004, 10:52 AM
Beautiful Beads!!

Can you tell me what size tubing you bought and where you bought it. I love the look and want to try this.
Thanks
Laurie


We bought the tubing from 'Just for Fun Enterprises' (JFF) here in Atlanta, it's great to have a local supplier for almost all of this stuff. You can also get it from Rio Grande and any number of the jewelry supply houses if you don't have a local dealer. We used 3mm for the larger hole (1/8 mandrel) and 2.5mm for the smaller one.

Thanks much
Robert

Mike E etc
08-12-2004, 11:41 AM
I really need to learn this...Very cool.

Mike E

Roxy
08-12-2004, 11:55 AM
Waaaaaay cool! The caps look great. :clap: But being tool challenged I wil have to settle to buy the caps lol.

Roxy

Lenda
08-12-2004, 04:49 PM
Beautiful beads Robert and the silver touch is special.

So I had boughten the tools and silver and stuff before, but I couldn't get the initial bending over of the tubing to happen, It starts a little bit and then, BEND! AND I always bend the tubing in the middle! What are you using under the tubing and bead when you start the flair with your awl? Could I see a pic of your awls? I finally gave up with not much success at it. It's nice to see that it CAN be done! :o

BioImage
08-12-2004, 06:57 PM
I think that there are a couple of tricks to getting the tubing to bend over evenly at the ends. First, go slowly when expanding the flair on the awls, reversing the bead every few taps. I change over to a dapping punch after I get the flair started, still reversing the bead after a few taps. It doesn't happen in a hurry.

I bought a couple of inexpensive awls, each with a fairly broad shoulder, about $2 each. One is mounted in a block of wood, the other is loose. I tried using a bigger hammer, but I found that my small chasing hammer works best for control. After you get a good start on rounding over the flair you can shift over to using the peen end of the hammer for rounding while the bottom of the bead rests on the flat top of the vise . I use sterling tubing that fits failry tight inside the bead and leave only about 1/2 the diameter of the tube sticking out on each end before I start rounding over. Jean Houghton has a good description of the process on the Southern Flames web site - I learned how to do this from her demo at our meeting in July.

I put a couple of photos below, hope they are of some use.

Robert

Lenda
08-12-2004, 08:45 PM
Hi Robert. Thank you so much for explaining and for the pics. Can I ask one more thing? Pretty please>

I'm assuming that you're putting the tubing and bead on top of the awl that's attached to the wood with awl up, then insert the other awl from the top and tap? Is that correct? :confused:

That would seem logical to me, but then Spock I am not! :rolleyes:

BioImage
08-13-2004, 09:46 AM
You've got it. Holding the bead and caps and tubing while you start the flair on the end of the tubing is tricky. I use the last three fingers on my right hand to hold these bits and hold the top awl in place with my thumb and forefinger. (I'm a lefty) Tap the top awl a few times, then reverse the bead and do it again. You can also rotate the top awl so that the sides of the awl help to force the lip of the tube to spread outwards. Keep the awl tip in the tube and lean the top end of the awl outwards as you rotate it. It's hard to describe without a movie. As soon as the tube ends spread out enough to hold the caps in place, switch to a dapping punch to make it flatten and roll over evenly. I end up working with the peen end of the hammer, tapping down the sides of the rivet head so that there are no edges sticking up. The bottom rivet rests on the anvil part of the vise while I do this. This takes a light touch so that you don't dent the cap or break the bead. Then sand and buff to a high finish. Viola! Right now it takes me about 30-40 minutes to do one, but I've only done a few and I expect it will speed up a little as I get better at it.
Note: the tapping will begin to drive anyone around you to utter distraction. DAMHIKT (Don't Ask Me How I Know This)
Robert

Lenda
08-13-2004, 01:12 PM
Thanks so much for the play by play Robert, I really appreciate you taking the time to write it. I'm pretty good at visualization, so I pretty much get it. So aren't you glad I'm not asking for THAT movie?? :evil: ;)

I've been wondering if it was my silver tubing that I got from Rio, it's 1/2 hard and geez I bought a bunch. :rolleyes: Wondering if that's too hard! Haven't been able to find just soft tubing though!

Thanks again Robert for your info and good luck, they look fabo!:D

BioImage
08-13-2004, 01:17 PM
I think that tubing will be hardened to some point by the drawing process. The tube stock that I have seems fairly rigid but will work OK, just don't try to go too fast or it might split or crack instead of stretching and bending.

Robert