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impressionist2
10-11-2001, 07:22 AM
For those artists using glazes. Can you please share your recipes for your glazing medium? Also, are you having any trouble with additional glazes beading up on the underglazes? I have been using a stand oil/turp/damar combination and I would like to find a better combo. Thank you. Renee Brown http://www.LongIslandFineArt.com

Titanium
10-11-2001, 08:45 AM
Renee ,

your glaze recipe is missing the cobalt drier.
Check a copy of Ralph Mayer to correct it.

Beading means your using too much glaze
medium. Needs more pigment.
To keep adhesion when beading occurs , you
need to abrade with fine sand paper.

Hope this helps.
Titanium

sarkana
10-11-2001, 09:07 AM
here is my current favorite glaze recipe.

1 part venetian turpentine (larch resin)
1 part walnut oil
4 parts pure gum turpentine
splash of oil of spike lavender (for pleasant smell)

combine all ingredients in a glass jar and let sit overnight to thoroughly mingle. a drier could be added to this glaze but i prefer to work without them.

more recipes at
http://store.yahoo.com/sarkana/recipes.html

see also:
http://www.studioproducts.com/forum/forum.html
the recipes forum is fantastic

Verdaccio
10-11-2001, 09:42 AM
Originally posted by impressionist2
For those artists using glazes. Can you please share your recipes for your glazing medium? Also, are you having any trouble with additional glazes beading up on the underglazes? I have been using a stand oil/turp/damar combination and I would like to find a better combo. Thank you. Renee Brown http://www.LongIslandFineArt.com

Renee:

I believe I have given you my medium recipe via private email - if you don't have it, then post again and I will give it here. The thing about using a medium with any Damar in it means that your painting is at risk for over cleaning in the future - Damar is removable with solvent, and is often used as the last varnish. Not that you should stop using Damar, but I like to put my glazing medium recipe in pencil on the back of my painting. That way any conservator of the future will know that Damar is part of the mix and hopefully will exercise more care in cleaning.

vallarta
10-11-2001, 07:36 PM
I will give you my TWO recipes for glazing.

1. If I am in a hurry I use Liquinn.....it is an alkhyd and works fine...but has a habit of drying out very fast. It also gets thick and is more expensive then the other which frankly I prefer.

2. This is my own recipe and has never been disclosed before.

I mix 1/2 pint to 1 pt at a time.

The formula:

33% Linseed oil (I use painters linseed oil that is sold by the quart at Home Depot) It works fine and does not discolor the paint.

33% Paint thinner. Common paint thinner that you use to clean brushes. You could use turpentine by why?

secret ingredient follows"

33% PENETROL it is a paint conditioner also sold at Home Depot. It fills the roll of standoil etc but does a better job and makes the paint hard and fast.

To this I add a few drops of Colbalt Drier....if I want a fast drying mix. Without the drier the paint dries to the touch overnight. With the drier it dries rock hard overnight and dry to the touch in two or three hours.

If I want a thicker mixture I would add more PENATROL. For thinner add more paint thinner. You have to experiment to see what mix best suits your painting temperment.

This stuff works like magic. You can make three pints (Penetrol comes in 1 pt cans) for a total cost of around 6 dollars. I suggest that when you make it then pour out a few ounces into a jar that can be sealed....and use it to dip your knife/brush in to make glazing mixes. This helps to keep air from the mix.

vallarta

Degas5
10-11-2001, 09:19 PM
Liquin, yuk. Tastes awful and paints even worse. If you have to use it, use it as a drier but never as a glazing medium. Why? Too slick to paint on top of; succeeding layer beads up. And this is not just my opinion. I've heard it from too many painters.
Stand oil dries faster than linseed oil. That is one of the reasons, besides it levelling property, that it makes a great glazing oil.
Bonnie

sarkana
10-14-2001, 09:20 AM
i had to voice my strong agreement with the last post. liquin is so difficult for me to deal with that i think the detriment outweighs any benefit. plus, i simply can't stand the smell.

there are lots of reasons to use turpentine instead of regular old paint thinner, one of which is its really nice to paint with. good turpentine smells much better than paint thinner. turpentine is solvent enough to dissolve natural resins like damar, but not so solvent that it will pick up older layers of paint.

what the heck is penetrol? japan drier? a petroleum distillate? i'm interested in your process, vallarta, but i never add anything to my canvas unless i'm sure where it came from.