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Scientist Dave
10-05-2001, 11:36 AM
Perch

No.2 pencil on an old piece of poster-weight paper I found in my desk at home. Please give me your honest critiques. I can take it... really.

Dave

LornaM
10-05-2001, 12:59 PM
okay, scientist...you asked for it.... wonderful drawing. unique to me. the first thing that popped into my mind, and i donīt know why, was Kafkaīs The Hunger Artist. i admire the strength of this, the lines, the way my eyes are richly rewarded as i look more and more. great work ! thanks for sharing it...

mame
10-05-2001, 01:26 PM
And the scientist draws too.

No waxing as eloquently as you here. Suffice to say it aint half bad and I wish I'd thought of it.

Scientist Dave
10-05-2001, 02:43 PM
Lorna,

Thank you for responding. Is this really unique? Since my art background is non-existent, I have no basis for judging how my work would be percieved by those in the field. Looking at the post, I realized that one might wonder "what's going on with the figure's mouth?". He is sticking out his tongue... to be fed I guess. When I sketch (most would call doodling) I begin by drawing very lightly and without a definitive purpose. As the lines start to gel in my mind and on the paper, I reinforce the ones I like and ignore the ones I don't. I keep going and going. Sometimes, as in this case, an actual recognizeable figure materializes. Most-times I go to far and end up ruining something I previously liked. I almost did it with this one... maybe I did. In any event, I think the "strength" in the lines comes from my obsessive reiterations of the lines I like. You can see the outer lines I didn't like around the figure.

Thanks again.

Mame,

Just because I ramble on incessantly doesn't make me eloquent, but thanks for the compliment. I am truly flattered that you wish you had thought of this form (I like your work as you found out), but I must admit that active thought had little to do with it. The figure appeared from my somewhat-random application of line. Once I saw the figure, though, I became very focused on it. I must say that the sketches that turn into something end up as some sort of human form, so I must be guiding them a reasonable amount. I don't actually draw very frequently. I thought that coming to this site would get me to do it more. Maybe someday I'll learn how to paint. Also, don't be afraid of telling me what's wrong with it, either compositionally, emotionally, or technically.

Thank you. P.S. I've checked out tooth fairy and am thinking about it...

mame
10-05-2001, 03:25 PM
the "quality" of this drawing is exquisite. The search for form is THE thing. Don't be afraid to share the search. Sensitive and sophisticated. Intuitive emotive quality. This is one fine drawing.
Look at Leonardo da Vinci.


My eye wants to find the other foot.

Scientist Dave
10-05-2001, 03:44 PM
Mame,

The foot I presume you looked for (and found, I hope) was one of the first things that I "found" in this piece while drawing it. It grew out from there.

Thanks for taking the time to comment. I'll check out Leonardo. He was quite a scientist as well.

Dave

ZOTMA
10-05-2001, 05:16 PM
said foot would be there tucked with the standing 'hand' right?
I'm enjoying this drawing profusely
it is rewarding to look at, the connections, contortion
a hungry bundle? perhaps
or just the right position for what needs to happen

wonderful drawing anyway, hope you do pick up paint
keep randomly sketching, it's a freedom that seems hard to impose once one has supressed it

LornaM
10-06-2001, 08:08 AM
Hi Dave... i enjoyed reading your description of how you draw. when i said unique to me i meant i have never seen anything like it. i do see a lot of art here, but not much new or avant-garde american work... itīs a drawing to be proud of. sounds like it evolved out of your sub-conscious. cool !

AmyH
10-08-2001, 11:53 AM
hey dave,

pretty good for a guy that doesn't draw much. I like that searching out technique also. you got the light source well for imaginary, hard to do. the only gripes I got are; too much detail (unecessary/distracting) in the hair, and I 'd like to see a darker background setting, more conducive (sp) to the image, in my mind.

amy

Scientist Dave
10-08-2001, 11:59 AM
Zotma,

Thanks for commenting. I am glad you enjoy looking at it. As the one who drew it, I find it hard not to dwell on the parts I don't like. Every time I see it, it becomes a little less enjoyable. I would guess that's a common problem (or maybe it's not?). I hope this doesn't happen as you look at it.

Lorna,

From the sub-conscious to the conscious is a very tricky transition. I really don't know how one can tell whether an idea or expression comes as a whole from the sub-conscious or is pieced together from tiny fragments of the conscious. From the earliest unguided lines of the drawing, my mind either picked up on a sub-conscious theme or it imposed a theme upon the lines in an attempt to order the unordered. But if the latter was the case, was the theme imposed derived from the sub-conscious or from pieced together fragments of conscious? As with the question of how many licks it takes to get to the Tootsie Roll center of a Tootsie Pop... the world will never know.

Thanks for commenting. I hope I don't discourage you from commenting again with all of my blather. I just can't stop myself.

Dave

Scientist Dave
10-08-2001, 12:20 PM
Amy,

Thanks for the helpful comments. I was actually thinking about putting a random feather or two in the hair, but they didn't work out well at all so I stopped. I hadn't mentioned this before, but you found me out. I hadn't even thought about the background much. I agree that a darker background is more in keeping with the image. I have thought about re-visiting this theme in a larger drawing and maybe another medium (oil pastel? that's all I got...), but I am afraid it I won't be able to get the same feel or posture next time. How do you deal with this issue in your own work? Does your technical skill allow you to "force" the image you want to appear or does the feeling and inspiration of the work take the lead. I realize that skills acquired over a long period of time become second nature and require less energy to command, but there still must be some mix of cold technicality and feeling. Do your paintings derived from sketches have less emotional/psychological input during the process of painting them than the sketches themselves? Do you do large-scale paintings without any prior concept of what they will be?

OK. That should do it for now. Sorry for summoning the Spanish Inquisition on you... I hope it wasn't too painful.

Thanks again, Dave

mame
10-08-2001, 12:41 PM
Another artist you might look at is Giacometti.

AmyH
10-08-2001, 01:10 PM
hey dave,

it is best to let mediums do as they will. oil pastels are hard to get fine lines with (small scale) so one wouldnt want to try, unless you enjoy the torment of trying to get a medium to do something it isnt willing to do ;) If you work really large however, from a distance the oil pastels could look like finer lines than if you worked small. Endless combos of materials sizes etc.

If you do this in oil pastel I recomend (sp) working larger, and griding it out. copy your drawing, and draw a grid over it, then grid your paper before you do the oil pastel. chuck close works like this. its a very old way of transfering drawings, and it works really well.

amy

ZOTMA
10-08-2001, 03:07 PM
Dave,
I think it is a common problem that one slowly loses that 'pleased feel' one has with a piece as it grows on them. Right after completion it's got the afterglow of fresh creative process and the satisfaction of resolution. Soon your eye will find the problems (I think it's part of the infinite learning process imposed by your eye/brain, how can one make it better next time.....). So you spring from that into the next piece. The grid works for copying/resizing pieces very well. I personally lose interest quickly in those pieces because to me they become purely technical and lack the emotional creative solution that drives my process most of the time. It's a shortcoming, I suggest trying it. Howz the bay area (I'm from Cupertino).

sukantsaran
10-11-2001, 12:46 AM
Hi Dave

I kept coming back to the drawing. Yoga has several schools and in one of them, called "hatha yoga", the yogi adopts a very difficult posture and meditates. Some of the revered yogis in India are often depicted in a similar posture. In fact as soon as I saw the drawing I felt that something was missing. Now I know what that might be. The expression on the face ! I was expecting him to be calm. Instead, he is agitated. Perhaps, you did not draw him as a yogi.