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bigblackbox
06-29-2004, 07:55 PM
I've been looking for some animation software, and after good advice here and countless downloads, installations, and incomprehensible user manuals, I finally came across something that seems like just what I'm looking for: LiveMotion. I'm still playing around with it, but seems intuitive and powerful enough for my needs. (But I'd love to hear what others think of it - good aspects, limitations, etc.)

But it looks like Adobe is discontinuing LiveMotion. And while you can save the files as Flash, now I'm wondering, "How long will Flash be around?" and I'm thinking about all those useless old floppy disks. In 5 years, will all Flash animations be obsolete? At this point, I'm just kind of curious about what archival might mean for digital art. A more practical question is whether it's worth buying LiveMotion, or whether there is something like it out there.

kbilltv
06-30-2004, 10:31 AM
I'm guessing Flash will be around for a while. But at the rate browsers and operating systems change, whether what you did today is is still viewable/sharable on the web 5 years from now is always questionable, you may have to re-render.

Quicktime will probably be around too, so programs like Photoshop with Premiere, After-Effects, Final Cut Pro, etc... are another option, for non-vector art.

You can render dvds of your work to archive, too... but exctinction projections for dvd?

Smileawhyl
06-30-2004, 11:11 AM
I've been looking for some animation software, and after good advice here and countless downloads, installations, and incomprehensible user manuals, I finally came across something that seems like just what I'm looking for: LiveMotion. I'm still playing around with it, but seems intuitive and powerful enough for my needs. (But I'd love to hear what others think of it - good aspects, limitations, etc.)

But it looks like Adobe is discontinuing LiveMotion. And while you can save the files as Flash, now I'm wondering, "How long will Flash be around?" and I'm thinking about all those useless old floppy disks. In 5 years, will all Flash animations be obsolete? At this point, I'm just kind of curious about what archival might mean for digital art. A more practical question is whether it's worth buying LiveMotion, or whether there is something like it out there.
I would say don't buy LiveMotion because as far as I know, Adobe stopped their official support of this software this Spring, just as they have phased out PageMaker for InDesign.

You've mentioned your needs, but have not really defined them. That would be a big help in giving you information about the tools available. What is it you want to do with animation?

bigblackbox
06-30-2004, 12:52 PM
... You can render dvds of your work to archive, too... but exctinction projections for dvd?

That's interesting. I'm sure it's not a big deal for people who are writing banner ads in Flash, but what about artists? How do you save work? And while I'm just doing this for fun, I'm wondering how digital artists sell their work. What exactly is sold? A file?

bigblackbox
06-30-2004, 01:07 PM
You've mentioned your needs, but have not really defined them. That would be a big help in giving you information about the tools available. What is it you want to do with animation?

I'm not sure I know what you mean by defining my needs, as opposed to mentioning them. Is that the same as asking what I want to do with animation? If so, the answer is really, I don't know yet.

I want to get a sense of what I can do with animation to see if it's a medium that I might like. I'm sure that almost all the animation software out there is capable of doing more than I can imagine. It would probably be like Word - I use 5% of it's features a lot, 20% once in a while, and 75% never.

My biggest problem so far has been software that is non-intuitive, difficult to learn, and labor intensive. I would rather not spend 6 months learning Bryce or After Effects or Flash only to find it isn't right for me. Not that I'm opposed to putting in the time - but I'd like to have some idea whether it will pay off or not. Flash MX is more on the banging-head-against-the-wall side of things, and LiveMotion is more on the this-is-cool side of things.

I think what I'm looking for is pretty basic, but I'm not sure if that's try from the perspective of professional animation. But let me think about your question more and I'll try to be more specific.

Smileawhyl
06-30-2004, 09:45 PM
I'm not sure I know what you mean by defining my needs, as opposed to mentioning them. Is that the same as asking what I want to do with animation? If so, the answer is really, I don't know yet.

I want to get a sense of what I can do with animation to see if it's a medium that I might like. I'm sure that almost all the animation software out there is capable of doing more than I can imagine. It would probably be like Word - I use 5% of it's features a lot, 20% once in a while, and 75% never.

My biggest problem so far has been software that is non-intuitive, difficult to learn, and labor intensive. I would rather not spend 6 months learning Bryce or After Effects or Flash only to find it isn't right for me. Not that I'm opposed to putting in the time - but I'd like to have some idea whether it will pay off or not. Flash MX is more on the banging-head-against-the-wall side of things, and LiveMotion is more on the this-is-cool side of things.

I think what I'm looking for is pretty basic, but I'm not sure if that's try from the perspective of professional animation. But let me think about your question more and I'll try to be more specific.
Just from what you've said so far here is a link to a very simple to use (very inexpensive, plus you can get a 30 free trial download) program. Some of the samples are very simple, some a bit more impressive, but they have nice follow-along tutorials online and it familiarizes you with how animations work. I actually got started in animation with an interest in powerpoint and went directly to Ulead to learn more about graphics and then animation. The program is fun and the easiest user interface I've found in animated graphics programs. Ulead Samples (http://www.ulead.com/ga/samples.htm).

From my experience with this I found it much easier to slide into Adobe Premiere and AfterEffects than had I faced those programs down without it. Good luck!

bigblackbox
07-01-2004, 02:29 AM
Just from what you've said so far here is a link to a very simple to use (very inexpensive, plus you can get a 30 free trial download) program. Ulead Samples (http://www.ulead.com/ga/samples.htm).


Thanks, I ran across Ulead before and just checked the samples. At first I thought it would be primarily for short loops - primarily banner ads on the web. After a second look, including scanning the manual, I'm not sure. But worth a look. I'm also enjoying playing around with Moho.

kbilltv
07-01-2004, 02:43 AM
That's interesting. I'm sure it's not a big deal for people who are writing banner ads in Flash, but what about artists? How do you save work? And while I'm just doing this for fun, I'm wondering how digital artists sell their work. What exactly is sold? A file?

A print. "Giclee" is the thing now.

kbilltv
07-01-2004, 02:46 AM
Or, a concept. Intellectual property is an artist's thing. Not just for writers and musicians any more...