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scottb
09-25-2001, 05:44 PM
Hi gang - I was busy in the studio today (my music studio, not my art studio) and had some time in between sessions. FWIW, I am mastering down a demo of our own blues hero, Larry Seiler (lseiler). :D

Here is the result - the photos are horrible - will take some better ones tomorrow (in better light) and repost here. The colors in this first shot are very "bland".

"2x4: A Tribute", 18x24, oil on canvas (my first painting done solely with a palette knife)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/25-Sep-2001/2x4b.jpg

Cheers.
Scott

Jan-Michael
09-26-2001, 07:32 AM
I really like this Scott....the colours set a mood that hard to describe..and a fine example of how abstract art can say it like nothing else can...

Studio224
09-26-2001, 11:26 AM
I find this gripping
and sad...

I like it!

Anne-Claire

CarlyHardy
09-26-2001, 11:53 PM
Scott, its simplicity "shouts"

This is awesome!
carly

sukantsaran
09-27-2001, 01:29 AM
Very evocative.

Sukant Saran

reynolds
09-27-2001, 02:39 AM
scott,
i really love this painting. it reminds me of the granite cliffs in Yosemite, California. and oh by the way thanks so much for the site it is a gift for me to get to see and support so much good work.
thanks again.

scottb
09-27-2001, 08:33 AM
Thanks for the kind words, gang. I must say that this painting is very special to me. I am quite enjoying exploring my "abstract" side ... :)

Cheers.
Scott

scottb
09-27-2001, 10:18 AM
I believe I mentioned this in the related thread in the Critiques Forum, but the name is derived from 2 towers, 4 planes (2x4).

Cheers.
Scott

Scientist Dave
09-27-2001, 11:42 AM
Scott,

I am a newcomer to this site and to art/art critiquing in general, so I hope you will bear with me if I seem to be rambling. I saw this piece yesterday and ruminated on it a bit.

The skyline was immediately apparent to me. I felt that as a viewer I had been placed out on the water (maybe on a boat, maybe just hovering over the surface of the water) with the reflections of the buildings on the water stretching off to the right of me. The color of the sky was cold but hopeful, as it is in the early morning in Fall. The way this color stretched unimpeded from sky to land to water grouped these elements with each other and with me (the viewer) both emotionally and physically. The towers themselves, and to a lesser extent the other buildings, appeared to be growing upwards and shrinking back down to earth at the same time (or switching slowly between the two). The powerful green color in them sets them apart from the background without divorcing themselves from it and gives them a vital (organic?) quality. I identify with the towers in the sense that they have this vital-ness to them, but I am also still a viewer of them and so they remain somewhat enigmatic. The movement in the airplanes is great, and it is interesting that from the viewers perspective, it is entirely possible that they might not impact the towers. That may just be my optimism coming through. In any case, they are a very strong force in the piece, but they do not cast a completely overwhelming shadow over the paintng. The color of the airplanes is intriguing. They definitely strike me as being composed of the same vital force as the towers, but their darkness and powerful downward movement makes them sinister and focused, contrasting the ambiguousness of the movement of the towers and their generally placid nature.

Thoughtful work. Thanks.

Will there be more in this series?

scottb
09-27-2001, 11:59 AM
Originally posted by Scientist Dave
Scott,

I am a newcomer to this site and to art/art critiquing in general, so I hope you will bear with me if I seem to be rambling.


Welcome! :D


The skyline was immediately apparent to me. I felt that as a viewer I had been placed out on the water (maybe on a boat, maybe just hovering over the surface of the water) with the reflections of the buildings on the water stretching off to the right of me. The color of the sky was cold but hopeful, as it is in the early morning in Fall. The way this color stretched unimpeded from sky to land to water grouped these elements with each other and with me (the viewer) both emotionally and physically. The towers themselves, and to a lesser extent the other buildings, appeared to be growing upwards and shrinking back down to earth at the same time (or switching slowly between the two). The powerful green color in them sets them apart from the background without divorcing themselves from it and gives them a vital (organic?) quality. I identify with the towers in the sense that they have this vital-ness to them, but I am also still a viewer of them and so they remain somewhat enigmatic.


Wow - that's a pretty good analysis, Dave. Have you ever written professionally? Seriously ... you're very good at it.

The movement in the airplanes is great, and it is interesting that from the viewers perspective

Actually, the planes aren't pictured - hehe. The "object" to the upper right of the left building is actually the smoke from the first collision.

Will there be more in this series?

Yes - I am working on a new one now, at street level, as well as another one with some deviation from showing the "scene" itself, focusing more on the emotional aspect of it all ...

Thanks again for your fabulous commentary - and again, welcome!

Cheers.
Scott

Scientist Dave
09-27-2001, 03:20 PM
Scott,

Thanks for the greeting and response. In terms of my writing, I do a reasonable amount in my job. Thus far, anything that I have published has been in the scientific realm (research papers and reviews). I guess I don't think about how I write... it just comes out that way.

I looked at the image again after you revealed that the object I thought represented the airplanes is actually smoke. I can't get around my original interpretation, though, because the movement of that object still seems to be heading forcefully down as opposed to upwards (as smoke would). Either way, it is compelling.

If I could ask you (and everyone else) a favor, I would appreciate it. Since I have no formal art experience or training, I will likely not use appropriate terms when referring to specific elements in a piece. So if I make a blunder, please correct me. I want to learn.

Thanks,
Dave

scottb
09-27-2001, 03:56 PM
Dave, thanks for the followup - I see your point with regard to the planes. Several others have also made the same interpretation as you ... :)

BTW, you'll find the crowd here to be quite warm and receptive, especially to folks who want to learn.

Cheers.
Scott