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binkie
06-14-2004, 12:44 AM
I'm thinking about going to the art supply store in the next couple of days and wonder if anyone uses colour shapers? I noticed they come in several sizes 0, 2, 6 etc. and also soft, medium and firm. Are there any recommendations? Also, they come in 5 different shapes. Any particular shape preferred?

Thanks
gwen

CarlyHardy
06-14-2004, 08:12 AM
I don't like the color shapers....but I know that some members use them, probably with more success than I had. I don't work with a lot of detail or blending.

Personally, I like to use a firm plastic eraser....not the red kind that removes pigment, but the white plastic type. It blends and pushes the pigment into the tooth. The shape is nice for corners or large spaces. I use it on the tips, the sides and even create lines with the edges :) and they cost about a dollar each!

carly

Khadres
06-14-2004, 08:55 AM
I don't like the color shapers....but I know that some members use them, probably with more success than I had. I don't work with a lot of detail or blending.

Personally, I like to use a firm plastic eraser....not the red kind that removes pigment, but the white plastic type. It blends and pushes the pigment into the tooth. The shape is nice for corners or large spaces. I use it on the tips, the sides and even create lines with the edges :) and they cost about a dollar each!

carly

Very good tip! Had never thought of that, altho I have made soft, thin marks and "shaped" angles and such with a wad of kneaded eraser squashed into the right shape. I've got a couple of the real so-called shapers, but haven't gotten much use out of 'em...of course, I don't blend much either unless it's putting one color onto another.

I wish I COULD blend like a lot of folks in here do....they get such lovely results, but when I do it, it always just comes out chalky looking. Not sure what's up with that.

Thanks for the hint!

Doeark
06-14-2004, 12:18 PM
Hallo Gwen.

I got some kind of colourshapers in size 6 in Taper Point and Flat Chisel form. Those are not the original colourshapers from colourshaper.com but from a german company and they are called art-modelleur. They are only available in one degree of hardness as far as I know. I do not use the Flat Chisel form. I thought it could be useful for blending larger areas but found out that I can blend much softer with a blender brush. But the Taper point is great. The size is just right for detailed work. I use it to push the pastels into the paper tooth so I get a smoother look and I can make fine lines and strokes just as with a brush. I think the effect you can get is a kind of smearing rather than blending. Maybe you could use a hard plastic eraser instead of it like Carly mentioned but I like to have something in my hands that feels and behaves more like a real brush. It all depends on wich techniques you prefer and on personal taste but I would recommend to try them out.

Dirk.

Deborah Secor
06-14-2004, 02:01 PM
I use Colour Shapers and my favorites are flat chisel, firm (they get soft fast on Wallis paper)#10 & #6. I also have a #1 firm flat that I like for grasses and such, as it's about 1" wide or so. I use them all the time! Very handy tools, much better than fingers. Worth every penny.

Deborah

chewie
06-14-2004, 05:04 PM
i have the soft ones, and i like them ok, but deborah, please tell me how the firms feel? the soft are sure soft, but are labeled for pastel. since i must order everything and cannot touch first, i got them but wondered how the firm do instead? sometimes the soft are too flexible!! i wanted something more like my finger tip, not so flabby and limp. i do like the shapes i have which is taper, very handy in tiny spots. do the firm blend as well? i am wanting to just soften the stroke a bit, not so much totally blend. is a placing a small order in order?! gee, i always like getting new art stuff!

binkie
06-14-2004, 06:11 PM
Thanks so much everyone!! Think I'll buy a plastic eraser and a couple of colour shapers too.

gwen

artist_pw
06-14-2004, 06:19 PM
Hi:

I've used color shapers and they work, but on sanded paper, erasers are work just as well, and the sanded paper wears down the silicone on the color shapers so for the money, I'd use erasers since you can carve them to suit your needs too. In working with ceramics and polymer clay, color shapers are great!

Deborah Secor
06-17-2004, 07:31 PM
(Just getting back here after being out in the field for three days...) The firm ones feel a lot like a white plastic eraser, but I like the fact that they don't shed bits all over, since I use mostly Wallis paper. The shapes are conveient. I bought one soft one, a long wedge shape, and it just wiggles around, whereas the firm ones are stiff yet pliable.

I don't use them to blend per se, but to drag color around, or to mold it, moving the pigment up and down or side to side. I like it for grasses, since I can set two colors atop one another and then use the side of the shaper in a quick whisk to make blades. I can also use it to remove a bit of color on top to reveal what's beneath. Or I can grab a bit of one color and dab it into another spot.

Once I started thinking of the shapers as being a way to move pastel like a brush moves paint, not to mix it but to place it, I found them to be much more useful.

Deborah