PDA

View Full Version : graphire 3


stoney
06-08-2004, 01:51 AM
I've got to track down a source in my area to test one of these.

I had concerns about which size would be sufficient and was considering the 6 x 8 or the 9 x 12. Several people indicated the 4 x 5 was the best one they found for general use.

I was concerned about being restricted to such a small area. One person indicated not to think of the drawing area as a photograph. I got the impression your picture would scroll up or down as needed. The screen area would then be the 'active' area to be worked on.

Reading more about the graphire today indicated the small screens are restrictive. This suggested the full picture size was restricted to the screen area.

I'm confused. Is the screen area simply the active area of the picture being worked on or is the screen area the full boundry of the picture being worked on?

grahamrj
06-08-2004, 05:52 AM
stoney,

I am not sure I understand your question (especially what you mean by screen?), but I do have a Graphire 3, and can explain how it works. There is an area about 4" by 5" on the tablet, which is the active area. That is mapped to your monitor screen. You move the pen from left of active area to right of active area, and the pointer moves from left of screen to right of the monitor screen, and so on. What this means in terms of your picture depends on zoom and scroll settings.

4" by 5" does sound small, but if your mouse is set up in a typical way, you'll find you only have to move it something like 5" to cross the monitor screen. The pen is quite similar in this respect, but you get more control over the movement.

Graham

captan
06-08-2004, 05:53 AM
Reading more about the graphire today indicated the small screens are restrictive.

Complete bull****. (and by "small screens" I assume you mean small tablets - for screens (or displays or monitors, whatever you want to call it) the bigger the better)

The tablet maps to the screen - when you point at the top left corner of your tablet the mousepointer on your screen points to the top left corner of your screen etc. Period. You can set the tablet to "mouse action" or "mouse mode" whereas it behaves like a mouse - but this is only useful when using the tablet for other things than painting, say surfing the web (for which a mouse still is superior).

I've got to track down a source in my area to test one of these.

You could basically test any of Wacoms tablets to get the feel down - they're all esentially the same.

captan
06-08-2004, 06:10 AM
if your mouse is set up in a typical way, you'll find you only have to move it something like 5" to cross the monitor screen.

That is if you move the mouse very slowly - if you have the acceleration set properly on your mouse you move over a 19" screen with just an inch of movement of the mouse if you move it quickly - tablets don't work this way - there is no acceleration (unless it's set to mouse mode).

Example: You move the pen over the tablet 1 inch and the pointer on the screen moves maybe 5 inches. You move your pen over the tablet 2 inches and the pointer moves 10 inches. Regardless of how fast you move the pen. When doing the same with a mouse you get different results depending on how fast you moved it.

lemonbird
06-08-2004, 10:52 AM
I use a 4x5 Intuous 2 wacom tablet and I don't feel restricted at all. As captan was saying, it maps the tablet to the screen. Top left on the tablet is top left on the monitor, bottom right on the tablet is bottom right on the monitor and so on. The smaller size fits on my desktop quite nicely too. :)

stoney
06-08-2004, 11:10 AM
stoney,

I am not sure I understand your question (especially what you mean by screen?), but I do have a Graphire 3, and can explain how it works. There is an area about 4" by 5" on the tablet, which is the active area. That is mapped to your monitor screen. You move the pen from left of active area to right of active area, and the pointer moves from left of screen to right of the monitor screen, and so on. What this means in terms of your picture depends on zoom and scroll settings.

4" by 5" does sound small, but if your mouse is set up in a typical way, you'll find you only have to move it something like 5" to cross the monitor screen. The pen is quite similar in this respect, but you get more control over the movement.

Graham

Ah. Now I understand what the person was trying to say. There was a small piece of information not indicated at that point in the article which generated the perceived conflict.

Thank you, Graham.

stoney
06-08-2004, 11:12 AM
Complete bull****. (and by "small screens" I assume you mean small tablets - for screens (or displays or monitors, whatever you want to call it) the bigger the better)

The tablet maps to the screen - when you point at the top left corner of your tablet the mousepointer on your screen points to the top left corner of your screen etc. Period. You can set the tablet to "mouse action" or "mouse mode" whereas it behaves like a mouse - but this is only useful when using the tablet for other things than painting, say surfing the web (for which a mouse still is superior).

You could basically test any of Wacoms tablets to get the feel down - they're all esentially the same.

Thank you, Captan. The 'fog of confusion' has lifted. :)

stoney
06-08-2004, 11:15 AM
I use a 4x5 Intuous 2 wacom tablet and I don't feel restricted at all. As captan was saying, it maps the tablet to the screen. Top left on the tablet is top left on the monitor, bottom right on the tablet is bottom right on the monitor and so on. The smaller size fits on my desktop quite nicely too. :)

Thank you, Dragonflyfantasyart. I've got a 'space crunch' myself. Yea olde, 'confusion monster' has been vanquished. :)

Jet
06-08-2004, 02:21 PM
Stoney,
I had the same concern - i bought a 6x8 ---> result: Tired hand , tired lap. crammed desktop, pocket= -$350. (minus)

Went and bought a 4x5 ----> HAPPY

***Wish i hadn't listened to Wacom's "Analysis" page's suggestions... :mad:

Conclusion:
The only thing i use the 6x8 for, is to trace directly large pictures into PS/Painter.
*Quite expensive for doing what i already do, just by scanning the pic and trace it using layers . DUH! very wise me.. :D

Personal experience tale .

The last word is always yours. :)

Regards
:cool:

themanda
06-08-2004, 03:05 PM
yes..."maps to the screen"...that's what i was trying to say in your other thread! the tablet maps to the screen, thus making the relative smallness of the tablet irrelevant.

size does not matter!!! :)

beautifulfreak
06-12-2004, 05:10 AM
I know I'm coming to this discussion a bit late but I have an older wacom tablet(I got it on ebay), is a 12x12 I love it but I think the 12x9 would be a better size porportionally. I don't think I could use one of the little ones, the strokes I make on the big one more resembles the strokes I would make if I was drawing in my sketch book or a small canvas...nice broad free strokes. Only thing a little one would have as an advantage is ease of portability specially if one was working on a laptop. So I vote for the 12x9 one if your budget can handle it.

BTW, if you have older equipment and an older OS an older tablet works just fine and is much much lower in price on ebay(12x12 under $100, came in barely used condition, stylus, pen holder, extra nibs, all cords for mac and pc, software in original box...nice) I got a usb adaptor(also ebay) for the older serial plug and it was love at first pen stroke. :)

stoney
06-12-2004, 04:50 PM
Stoney,
I had the same concern - i bought a 6x8 ---> result: Tired hand , tired lap. crammed desktop, pocket= -$350. (minus)

Went and bought a 4x5 ----> HAPPY

***Wish i hadn't listened to Wacom's "Analysis" page's suggestions... :mad:

Conclusion:
The only thing i use the 6x8 for, is to trace directly large pictures into PS/Painter.
*Quite expensive for doing what i already do, just by scanning the pic and trace it using layers . DUH! very wise me.. :D

Personal experience tale .

The last word is always yours. :)

Regards
:cool:

Thank you, Jorge. I contacted Wacom and it turns out there's no store within 150 miles of me that sells them. I've got a list of 'brick and mortar' chains that carry them and whenever I'm in the area I'll investigate.

stoney
06-12-2004, 04:57 PM
yes..."maps to the screen"...that's what i was trying to say in your other thread! the tablet maps to the screen, thus making the relative smallness of the tablet irrelevant.

size does not matter!!! :)

I couldn't think of "maps to the screen," either.

LOLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL.............. :)

Note: subject change alert to one of satire and humour. I suspect a lot of ladies here would get a charge from the below site. Fair warning; keep all food and liquids out of reach and buckle the computer chair 'seat belt.' :evil: :evil:

Heartless Bitches International


Heartless Bitches International makes fun of gender stereotyping and societal double-standards. ... Hilarious Gifts for the Heartless Bitches in your life! ...

www.heartless-bitches.com

stoney
06-12-2004, 05:02 PM
I know I'm coming to this discussion a bit late but I have an older wacom tablet(I got it on ebay), is a 12x12 I love it but I think the 12x9 would be a better size porportionally. I don't think I could use one of the little ones, the strokes I make on the big one more resembles the strokes I would make if I was drawing in my sketch book or a small canvas...nice broad free strokes. Only thing a little one would have as an advantage is ease of portability specially if one was working on a laptop. So I vote for the 12x9 one if your budget can handle it.

BTW, if you have older equipment and an older OS an older tablet works just fine and is much much lower in price on ebay(12x12 under $100, came in barely used condition, stylus, pen holder, extra nibs, all cords for mac and pc, software in original box...nice) I got a usb adaptor(also ebay) for the older serial plug and it was love at first pen stroke. :)

Thank you for the feedback. One of the things I want to check out about size is based on concerns about my double vision and lack of fine-motor control.