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dcorc
06-01-2004, 07:21 AM
This month we are looking at the work of Paul Cezanne (1839-1906),
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jun-2004/30792-self-portrait.jpg

in particular, his painting Houses on the Roadside (Maisons au bord d'une route) 1881, 60x73 cm - 26.7x 32.6 ins

(This information, and images, put together by our friend Matt V. :) )

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jun-2004/30792-Houses_on_the_Roadside_Maisons_au_bord_dune_route.jpg

BIG version here (http://freespace.virgin.net/d.corcoran/cezannehouses.jpg)

Bio:

The French painter Paul Cezanne (1839-1906), who exhibited little during his lifetime and pursued his work in increasing isolation, is regarded today as one of the great forerunners of modern painting.

Paul Cezanne was born in Aix, a small city in Provence, France. His father, Philippe Auguste, was a banker and very watchful over family accounts. A strict authoritarian, Philippe Auguste was opposed to Paul's artistic goals and their father-son relationship was strained. On the other hand, his sister Marie and his mother were devoted to him and encouraged young Paul to paint. His mother told him about the Dutch Masters, such as Rembrandt and Rubens, and supplied him with his first box of paints.


At age 13, Paul was sent to College Bourbon, pleased to escape his father. It was at school he met and became fast friends with Emile Zola. This friendship was decisive for both men. Zola was not a native of Provence, which caused him to be ostracized by his fellow classmates. But Cezanne felt a kindred spirit in Zola and ignored the taunts of the other students. Zola dreamed of writing and Cezanne dreamed of painting.

Still unsure of himself and his future, Cezanne studied law from 1859 to 1861, but continued attending drawing classes at the same time. Against the wishes of his father, Paul finally made up him mind that painting was the profession he most wanted. So, in 1861, he joined Zola in Paris. His father's reluctant consent at the time brought him financial support and later a large inheritance on which he could live comfortably.

In Paris he met Camille Pissaro and came to know others of the Impressionist group of artists, with whom he exhibited his work in 1874 and 1877. The reviews of his work were not good and Cezanne remained an outsider to the Impressionist circle. He eventually rejected what he considered the Impressionists' lack of structure, declaring his intention to make Impressionism into "something solid and durable, like the art of museums."

The year 1886 was a pivotal year for Paul Cezanne. He married Hortense Fiquet, a model with whom he had been living for a number of years, and his father died. Perhaps more significant, that year was the publication of the novel L'Oeuvre by his great friend Emile Zola. The hero of the story is a painter (acknowledged to be a composite of Manet and Cezanne) who Zola presented as an artistic failure. Cezanne took this representation personally and was bitterly hurt by the incident. He never spoke to his friend Zola again.

In the years following 1886, the painter secluded himself more and more away from friends, at the family home in Aix. Supported by independent means, he produced still lifes, landscapes, and portraits. His works underwent continual adjustment, many required such prolonged reworking that he never considered them finished.

As an artist, Cezanne matured slowly. Art scholars maintain his greatest works were completed during the last 25 years of his life. In particular, the evolution of cubism and abstraction are due to his innovations. Since 1890, his work influenced nearly every avant-garde movement in painting.

Several days after being caught in a rainstorm, Paul Cezanne died on October 22, 1906. His life had been plagued with personal and professional failures. By the time of his death, a few of his works were being shown across Europe.

In the end, Cezanne triumphed, forging the principles of Modern 20th century art. It was only after his death that hindsight proved to all the world the enormity of his genius by proclaiming him the "father of modern art."

(I'll follow this by two further posts, one on Postimpressionism, and one giving some suggestions for approaches to this painting)

Dave

dcorc
06-01-2004, 07:53 AM
Postimpressionism

A term first used by the English painter and art-critic Roger Fry and made popular by John Rewald. A loose collective idea for the various artistic movements based on Impressionism(but moving away from its naturalist tendencies), starting in the 1880's. The foremost of these were Cezanne, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Matisse, Seurat,Toulouse-Lautrec. (They influenced the development of fauvism and cubism by Picasso and Braque, a little later).

There are good basic overviews of PostImpressionism in the following links:

http://www.artmovements.co.uk/postimpressionism.htm

http://www.eyeconart.net/history/postimpressionism.htm

http://www.ordrupgaard.dk/UK/stilarter/stil/postimpressionisme.html

Dave

dcorc
06-01-2004, 08:19 AM
Obviously I'm very interested to hear other people's interpretations of how this might have been painted - I don't recall having seen a Cezanne in real life(I'd better get down to some of the central London galleries and find some, rectify that situation promptly!) , so any comments from anyone who has would be particularly interesting to me -especially about surface texture, paint thickness and brushwork.

Here are my own first thoughts (mostly culled from a discussion about it recently - left in a comment or two at the end, as they may entertain :) ):

WARNING Personal opinion follows :p

In this painting the impression I get now from the photo is that the canvas is toned dullish yellow (it shows through in places), there's a quick fluid curvy outline sketch which appears to perhaps be in chrome green or terre verte (again, it shows through in places) and the paint is applied mainly as one layer, using primarily short straight dabs/strokes from a fairly large probably flat brush - using a set of pre-mixed colours, I suspect. In some ways it almost looks more like a pastel than a painting. Most of the strokes are either vertical or go from top-right to bottom left (suggesting that Cezanne was probably right-handed).

I can't work out whether some of the black and dark green lines on edges are underdrawing, or reinforcement after blocking-in colour. It will be interesting trying to match those vivid greens, (from tubed greens, or for yellow/blue mixes?) and I'd like to know what the paint consistency is like to draw those single marks pretty opaquely - the only way to test whether these surmises might be correct, is to try to replicate it using those approaches and see if one can make it work - that one does so doesn't guarantee that this is how it was done, but it can be a pretty good indication of how it was not done, if it doesn't work - there's also all sorts of stuff not part of my own painting style (for what it's worth :p ) - leaving gaps between strokes, no blending, no reworking etc - its good training to force oneself to try to get away from one's normal techniques and approaches. If one gets really good at it, one could forge "Cezanne"s for a living :eek: :D (have you seen what they sell for?) :evil:

OK - I'm done - so lets have lots of people joining up! Usual suspects please, plus some new ones? :)

Dave

Rosic
06-01-2004, 08:45 AM
I'm up to the challenge again this month. However... I am going on vacation from June 4th-13th for a relaxing time in the mountains. I plan to work on this painting while there.

Like Dave... I am also interested in hearing anyone's comments about technique/color/etc on this painting as a primer before I leave.

Pulled this info from Matt's site:
Cézanne simplified his application of the paint to the point where he seemed able to define volumetric forms with juxtaposed strokes of pure color. He himself spoke of “modulating” with color rather than “modeling” with dark and light.

He used cream white canvases and sketched in his motif with diluted ultramarine, then he applied color á la prima. He would use short brushstrokes, treating them as building blocks, or pieces of a puzzle.

Suggested palette:
Suggested tubes: Lead white, Cadmium Yellow, Raw Sienna, Cadmium Orange, Ultramarine blue, Cobalt blue, Phtalo Green and maybe Ivory Black.

Hope to see many familiar and unfamiliar faces join in on this one. ;)
Bernie

dcorc
06-01-2004, 08:53 AM
Hi Bernie - good to have you on-board! (I'd forgotten Matt's older website's had that extra info - Ultramarine instead of green for the sketch, and palette suggestions - excellent!)

Roll up, roll up... :)

Dave

artbabe21
06-01-2004, 09:04 AM
Hi Guys! Just put a sticky on this thread so it won't be floating around & will cut the other loose in a day or so. Dave thanks for putting up the info...:)

Bernie I was going to joke you with, 'A VACATION, when we're painting the masters?'....but since you're taking it with tis OK...LOL..

IMNRTST
06-01-2004, 10:05 AM
Hi
I'm in.
I agree with Dave that the canvas does look like it was tinted with a kind of yellow. so i think that's gonna be my starting point.
Trying not to blend everything and leave my strokes as they are placed is gonna be my toughest challenge with this one i think. (i tend to overwork areas alot)
Gonna start in the next few days woooooo can't wait. :D
Mike

J-Van
06-01-2004, 11:27 AM
Hi - I'm in for the 1st time & looking forward to trying this out.

Not to dis whoever furnished the reference pic, I find it somewhat washed out or 'overexposed'. Just my personal view, may be all wet!
So I searched for a higher res image to print out and found a couple which show quite a darker scheme.

Since the painting is in The Hermitage I went there, virtually of course, and found the same - go here, (http://www.hermitagemuseum.org/fcgi-bin/db2www/fullSize.mac/fullSize?selLang=English&dlViewId=A0T8UQ8NH2GWL$WL&size=big&selCateg=picture&dlCategId=FBNG15KYVO8L%2B40WBD&comeFrom=browse) some difference eh?

Which brings up how well can we replicate a master with such conflicting basis? :(
I'm gonna hit the local library, any suggestions for book titles to search?

loop
06-01-2004, 11:40 AM
Hi - I'm in for the 1st time & looking forward to trying this out.

Not to dis whoever furnished the reference pic, I find it somewhat washed out or 'overexposed'. Just my personal view, may be all wet!
So I searched for a higher res image to print out and found a couple which show quite a darker scheme.

Since the painting is in The Hermitage I went there, virtually of course, and found the same - go here, (http://www.hermitagemuseum.org/fcgi-bin/db2www/fullSize.mac/fullSize?selLang=English&dlViewId=A0T8UQ8NH2GWL$WL&size=big&selCateg=picture&dlCategId=FBNG15KYVO8L%2B40WBD&comeFrom=browse) some difference eh?

Which brings up how well can we replicate a master with such conflicting basis? :(
I'm gonna hit the local library, any suggestions for book titles to search?



hello everybody, I'm back from vacation :D , anybody have the skinny on what version is more accurate to the original ?? I prefer the darker one , but do want to be true to the original. what are you guys doing for size... ? geeze I gotta go prep someting :eek:

bjs0704
06-01-2004, 11:41 AM
Hi everyone! I will be giving this MOM a try. It is going to be quite a change from the way I have been painting.

I found a bit on Cezanne’s painting technique in “Copying Masterpieces” by Jose Parramon. I suspect that it has been out of print for a while, but if your library has it, their color mixtures in there are really interesting.

Some of their major point:

Parramon’s recommended palette was Titanium White, Yellow ochre, Cadmium yellow medium, Cadmium Red medium, Deep Madder, Emerald green, Ultramarine blue and Burnt Sienna though he is copying “The Blue Vase” in his demonstation. (I suspect the actual colors used are somewhere between Matt’s version and Parramon’s version.)

They mention that Cezanne used “flat, wide brushes”. He use about a #8, #12, and #14 and then alternate with #4, 6, and 8.

He painted here and there all over the canvas.

He would begin with a generilize charcoal sketch on the canvas and draw over it with a greyish tone.


They also emphasize that Cezanne drew and painted at the same time.

I hope that some of this may be a help.

Barb Solomon :cat:

dcorc
06-01-2004, 12:25 PM
Hi - I'm in for the 1st time & looking forward to trying this out.

Not to dis whoever furnished the reference pic, I find it somewhat washed out or 'overexposed'. Just my personal view, may be all wet!
So I searched for a higher res image to print out and found a couple which show quite a darker scheme.

Since the painting is in The Hermitage I went there, virtually of course, and found the same - go here, (http://www.hermitagemuseum.org/fcgi-bin/db2www/fullSize.mac/fullSize?selLang=English&dlViewId=A0T8UQ8NH2GWL$WL&size=big&selCateg=picture&dlCategId=FBNG15KYVO8L%2B40WBD&comeFrom=browse) some difference eh?

Which brings up how well can we replicate a master with such conflicting basis? :(
I'm gonna hit the local library, any suggestions for book titles to search?



Hello Jack and welcome!

I've just done a quick google search, and the other postings I've seen actually seem to originate from the same image as Matt originally posted (they have the same rather nasty jpeg checkerboard compression artefacting - which I cleaned up a little in Photoshop before posting the large version this morning)

To my eyes, the Hermitage one looks a little under-lit and, more bothersomely, surprisingly unevenly lit with quite a bit of vignetting in brightness values. While the large one I posted shows quite a bit of softening as a result of my attempts to decrease other artefacting, the Hermitage one shows quite marked sharpening artefacts on close inspection, with haloing at edges.

The Hermitage one is colour-balanced a little towards magenta, the other somewhat more yellow.

Take your pick, I'm afraid :)

If you can supply other links for better darker images you found (look in your "history" list for your browser) I'd be grateful.

Dave

guillot
06-01-2004, 01:53 PM
Oh Boy, I've still to finish the other :D

This one will be so different from the others we have done so far. ;)

Tina

dcorc
06-01-2004, 02:16 PM
I'm going to have a go at this on a board 16x20ins (the original scales to 16x19.5)

Tina - I also still need to finish last month's (and Feb's :rolleyes: )

Dave

artbabe21
06-01-2004, 02:23 PM
Tina - I also still need to finish last month's (and Feb's :rolleyes: )


me three! now I don't feel so bad... :o

WV.Artistry
06-01-2004, 02:55 PM
A few notes from the cliff:

I confessed my lack of understanding "what the big deal is" re: Paul Cezanne to a well-respected local artist, and she told me "what the big deal is . . . " is that I didn't understand Paul Cezanne used negative space. I pulled the thorn from my side and thought about it, but I still don't get it entirely.

I think the emptiness uses that term, but don't quote me, I still need coffee. It's the void not painted for immediate attention that Cecanne is doing his real work.

Hope that helps.

Richard

dcorc
06-01-2004, 04:17 PM
OK - I've taken a 16x20ins acryic-primed board (unsanded), slapped on a coat of titanium white + yellow ochre to tone it. I'd take a photo, but it's boring to look at!

Dave

Biki
06-01-2004, 04:40 PM
Intersting version you posted Jack. I like it much better.

I actually found the first version ugly. so decided not to paint it.
Now I have seen the heritage photo, I find it quite beautiful.

I still don't think I can do it tho. I might be moving house - so will be packing up the easel & paint's along with everything else.

But I'll be watching. :D

IMNRTST
06-01-2004, 11:26 PM
What's up with the little red house in the background?
it seems the more i look at it....the more distracted by it i get :confused:
is it just me or is the perspective on the roof a little off.?
I can't tell n e more lol
Mike

IAmLeavingEbay4Ever
06-02-2004, 03:22 AM
A few notes from the cliff:

I confessed my lack of understanding "what the big deal is" re: Paul Cezanne to a well-respected local artist, and she told me "what the big deal is . . . " is that I didn't understand Paul Cezanne used negative space. I pulled the thorn from my side and thought about it, but I still don't get it entirely.

I think the emptiness uses that term, but don't quote me, I still need coffee. It's the void not painted for immediate attention that Cecanne is doing his real work.

Hope that helps.

Richard

I think that's a bunch of Rubbish and Cezanne was just a bad artist.

IAmLeavingEbay4Ever
06-02-2004, 03:27 AM
What's up with the little red house in the background?
it seems the more i look at it....the more distracted by it i get :confused:
is it just me or is the perspective on the roof a little off.?
I can't tell n e more lol
Mike

Cezanne had the idea of using incorrect perspective in some of his paintings. They say this was the beginning of cubism and a great innovation. I say big whoop.

LadyJane65
06-02-2004, 04:45 AM
Think I am gonna try this Dave. If for no reason other than a learning experience. Should foul this up really well. Found a board about the rights size, so after work today, will tone it up, sharpen the old brushes, dig out the recommended palette, and fall upon my sword!! ;)

LJ

Rosic
06-02-2004, 08:17 AM
Dave, Mike, Loop, Barb, Tina, & Richard... the all-stars are back in the line-up this month! :clap:

Jack & LJ... Glad to see you sign up for the challenge. You'll have fun, make friends, and maybe even learn something new. :clap:

Cathleen & Biki... Hope it works out where you can join us! ;)

IAmLeavingEbay4Ever... Are you gonna paint with us or just grumble? ;) :D

Anyone else care to join in on the fun? :cool:

I started with a charcoal sketch fixed on a 20"x16" stretched canvas which I toned with yellow ochre. This will be my only work post until the middle of the month. I am going on vacation (taking my canvas with me :D ) from June 4-14.
Bernie

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Jun-2004/17108-momjune2.JPG

guillot
06-02-2004, 09:31 AM
.......will tone it up, sharpen the old brushes, dig out the recommended palette, and fall upon my sword!! ;)

LJ

LOL :D Great to see you joining in !!

Bernie You are off to a well rounded beginning. Enjoy the vacation!!!!!!! I could use a good 2 weeks at the beach :D

Cathleen No, you are not alone. :) Like your painting in the "what's on your easel" thread!! Hope you can get to this one - I have a gut feeling that this one will be a quickie. (meaning of course from finish to end, not how long it takes ME ( :D ) to get to it, LOL )

Dave - 16 x 20 is what I'm going for as well.

Nice to see the new faces joining in!! Regardless of the choice of the month, some like some do not, it will still be a learning experience, even if for the negative shapes :)

Tina

IMNRTST
06-02-2004, 10:32 AM
where would i put my request for some Salvador Dali for one of next year's MOM? :D :D
Mike

artbabe21
06-02-2004, 10:43 AM
where would i put my request for some Salvador Dali for one of next year's MOM? :D :D


Mike, we're not that far ahead yet...but that sure is a great suggestion!! :)
Hold it til we get busy on next years & perhaps we'll vote on some of the favorites!! :)

Rosic
06-02-2004, 12:50 PM
Bernie... Enjoy the vacation!!!!!!! I could use a good 2 weeks at the beach :D
Tina
I live on the coast and head to the mountains every chance I get...
I guess the grass is always greener elsewhere. ;)
I bet your husband is tired of the sand by now. How is he doing? Did he make it to Iraq alright? Keeping him, you, and the kids in my prayers. :angel:
B

guillot
06-02-2004, 01:43 PM
Hi Bernie - he was in the initial war, came home and then went to Korea for a year :( :crying: I appreciate the thoughts and prayers (very much needed prayers)... thank you. He's missed very very much.

Tina

dcorc
06-02-2004, 02:01 PM
What's up with the little red house in the background?
it seems the more i look at it....the more distracted by it i get :confused:
is it just me or is the perspective on the roof a little off.?
I can't tell n e more lol
Mike

The line of the rightmost portion of the roof is a bit off - but it's not inconceivable it could have been like that in real life.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Jun-2004/30792-roof1.jpg

The other thing which I find a little disconcerting is that the roof "leaps out" a bit, due to the strength of the colour.

Dave

dcorc
06-02-2004, 02:10 PM
IAmLeavingEbay4Ever - if you're just going to grumble, then we want to see at least one good grumbly post every day of the month telling us something fresh about why you dislike this painting! :p

Is it that it's not tightly painted photorealistic? - do you object to Cezanne in particular? - or the post-impressionists in general.?

It's true that it's painted in PostImpressoDaubyVisionTM - but when I take off my spectacles (I'm very short-sighted) it's striking how well it works in capturing the feeling of light and of space.

Dave

artbabe21
06-02-2004, 02:20 PM
IAmLeavingEbay4Ever - if you're just going to grumble, then we want to see at least one good grumbly post every day of the month telling us something fresh about why you dislike this painting! :p


Dave, be careful what you ask for! Such an ungrumbly group we are, don't know that we need a fly in the ointment so to speak..at least IMO

dcorc
06-02-2004, 02:39 PM
Dave, be careful what you ask for!

Hi Cathleen - don't you think it would be a good test of IALEB4E's creativity to produce a new grouse each day? :p

(I'm in a crotchety mood, as I'm having a little spat over on Cennini on Rob H's home-baked thoughts about turpentine :evil: )

Dave

bjs0704
06-02-2004, 03:33 PM
Hi Everyone!

I hope things are going better for you, Dave!:angel:

I toned a 16” x 20” canvas board with yellow ochre last night. Today, I have been working on the charcoal drawing.

For those who are undecided about doing this one, I can say that the drawing part is going pretty quickly. It is quite a bit easier than the Raphael from last month. :cool:

Wasn’t Cezanne the one who was lauded for his “upturned planes” and “multiple vanishing points”? While my art history classes are a hazy memory now and Cezanne was never my favorite, I suspect that the red house is an example of shifting vanishing points and planes. There are spots along the top of the walls that also show this characteristic. I notice that the vanishing point of the road and the house are about in the same place. Cezanne seems to have been determined to establish focal point in his composition.

Thanks J-Van for giving us the link to the Hermitage. Their site had an interesting note about Cezanne’s composition.


The motif of a turn in the road played a particularly important role in Cézanne's painting in the late 1870s and early 1880s. It enabled the artist to capture his own impressions expressively and simply, while serving as an effective means to organize the painting. In a natural fashion, a road ties together various planes within a work. The bend in the road provided Cézanne with a convenient way to limit himself to the foreground and middle ground. Although the landscape is devoid of people, it is related to the sphere of human activity: the small houses and bare stone walls along passageways create a sense that people leave behind these walls.

Well, I want get back to the drawing so I can let you see how it looks!

Barb Solomon :cat:

WV.Artistry
06-02-2004, 03:58 PM
Dave, Mike, Loop, Barb, Tina, & Richard... the all-stars are back in the line-up this month! :clap:

Bernie


Bernie, I can't comment on every WC post, but I do look at your paintings (and others) with high level of scrutiny. Personally, I think you should research the hell out of this with a microscope -- and then, "let go" on this piece. Say the magick words, "Let the paint . . . be paint". Your particular brush work, color usage, and composition technique might be naturally dispositioned for this. We'll see, ey?

I'm on the sidelines with this one, because I just don't get it. It's musical equivalent is the blues, for which I have no "feeling" for whatsoever, and it's an alien art form to my natural rhythms :music: When I look at this painting, I see a profile of a nude woman's back, her hand in her hair, and those things I do understand. But my failure to copy this piece would begin with the first brushstroke.

I think that's a bunch of Rubbish and Cezanne was just a bad artist.

Abu Dhabi --

OT: You need to follow-up with your post in the Classical forum with an attachment. Otherwise, readers are just making assumptions on which one you're actually talking about.

And yes, it's possible that "Cezanne was just a bad artist", although, I'd probably disagree with that even though I don't understand the appeal, the style, the story he's telling, or why he even told it to begin with.

Analogy: "What's he got, that I ain't got?" I said to my buddy, pointing at the guy with the gorgeous creature, arm-in-arm, walking past us. And my friend replied, "Well . . . he's got her."

:evil: I criticized last month's Raphael with acid on my brushes. But I did paint an interpretation of it. And I meant every brushstroke of blasphemy to that work for being called a masterpiece. So personally speaking, if you're unable to accurately paint this Cezanne, a rendition, or even an interpretation, with the same effort the other artists put into their work -- then your criticism might be considered without merit, and viewed simply as: Criticism, a destructive form of verbal tyranny masking the failure of personal evolvement.

Looking forward to seeing your painting. :angel:

Richard

dcorc
06-02-2004, 06:38 PM
I called in at the National Gallery, in Trafalgar Square, this afternoon to have a look at the Cezannes there, particularly:

Landscape with Poplars
http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/cgi-bin/WebObjects.dll/CollectionPublisher.woa/wa/work?workNumber=ng6457

Avenue at Chantilly
http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/cgi-bin/WebObjects.dll/CollectionPublisher.woa/wa/work?workNumber=ng6525

Hillside in Provence
http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/cgi-bin/WebObjects.dll/CollectionPublisher.woa/wa/work?workNumber=ng4136

Looking at these directly, a few things struck me - the canvas seemed to be fairly fine weave, and prepped to fill the grain somewhat. It was possible to see the toning, which appeared to be a dark cream - like a pale version of naples yellow perhaps, or white plus yellow ochre. The surface was mostly pretty flat (though some of the other Cezannes were painted more thickly, with impasto areas). There were areas marked out with fluid curvilinear sketch lines in dark blue paint. Colour was applied as series of vertical or diagonal strokes for the most part - with six or seven regularly spaced in the same colour, as though they'ed been done as a group with a brisk regular movement - occasionally there were squiggles. The paint was mostly thin and flat, to the point of being translucent in places. On the ground there were big sweeping horizontal strokes. The paint surface was noticably dull and matte. Generally colours were not very saturated or dark - of the two versions of our MOM here, the original posting is actually closer to what I saw today (although its colours are more saturated than these 3 Cezannes I saw in real life)

Dave

guillot
06-02-2004, 06:55 PM
Thanks for that input Dave! That is one of the most important things we have to remember when doing these MOM's - we're working with photographs. Kudos to those who have the benefit of visiting a museum that contains paintings of the Master's we have chosen to get a good grasp of the "real". Otherwise - we only have the picture to work from unfortunately, but regardless - I'm still learning a lot from doing these.

Thank you Dave for being so generous to share that information.

Tina

J-Van
06-02-2004, 09:41 PM
Well,,,
yest afternoon I visited our local library, stocked with a nice collection of arty books and videos, and out of 30 or thereabouts books with at least some Cezanne photos, there wasn't one mention of the MOM painting.

So I sez, well look for other landscapes done at the same time and found about half were on the inky side and the rest sunny. His palette definitely seems to have lightened between 1880 and 1890.

I also brought home 3 videos on Mr. C specifically and hope to view them mebee tonight, tomorra fur sure.

I'm leaning to splitting the diff and lettin' fly.

The lil' red building may have had a shed roof or not! :p Howzat for an opinion!

Dave - in The Hillside in Provance you can sure see cubism trying to bust out. Those distant hills might well have been cubist boxes opened up and lain on the hillside. Thnx for the info you reported, I think I'll use a creamier color than I'd originally planned, 16 x 20 I guess.

Later,,,,,

bjs0704
06-02-2004, 11:12 PM
Dave - Thanks for the National Gallery links! They are an interesting comparison.

Jack - You are probably right! It is probably a shed in someone’s backyard. What better for a focal point!

It is good to have you join us!

I managed to get the outline done today:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Jun-2004/11410-sketch.jpg

Rosic
06-03-2004, 08:18 AM
Bernie, Personally, I think you should research the hell out of this with a microscope -- and then, "let go" on this piece. Say the magick words, "Let the paint . . . be paint". We'll see, ey?
Richard
Richard :D ... Thanks for the advice... but... Not gonna have any time to research this one... going on a much needed vacation. Working on this probably from the deck of our mountain lodge while listening to Muddy Waters... libations will most likely be involved (maybe what's needed to loosen up my brushstrokes)... gonna come back with a masterpiece or a piece of ____! ;) :D
Bernie

Leaving late tonight... See you guys in ten days!
Bern

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Jun-2004/17108-postcard.JPG

guillot
06-03-2004, 08:30 AM
enjoy your vacation Bernie :) Lovely place to go!! Ah, so close to home.

Tina

bjs0704
06-03-2004, 10:53 AM
It sounds wonderful! Enjoy your vacation, Bernie!

Barb Solomon :cat:

LadyJane65
06-03-2004, 05:44 PM
Well, folks, this is gonna be a LOT harder than I thought at first blush. I have just binned the 3rd attempt at drawing this out. Doing it on tracing paper, so no great loss, but really points up where my skills are really missing!!

So, may have to use a projector to get the angles right. Is this cheating??

LJ

dcorc
06-03-2004, 06:44 PM
Tina - I've got no excuse really for not going to have a look, it's a 40 min journey from where I live - walking round the NG is a jaw-dropping experience, iconically-famous painting after painting, all hung within yards of each other - the Cezannes; several Van Goghs; Raphael's Pope Julius II; Bronzino's Venus and Cupid; Titian's Diana and Actaeon and Bacchus and Ariadne; Holbein's Ambassadors, all within a few yards of each other - and on and on, room after room.

Jack - I think "splitting the difference" is a good idea, on colours etc. I'd agree the Hillside in Provance does look sort of protocubist :)

Barb - in the lead, I see :) - is that charcoal, or paint?

Bernie - probably missed you, by now - but have a good vac - see you in 10 days.

LJ - Personally, the attitude I take to these MOMs is that they are an exercise in painting technique - so I don't regard getting an accurate basic plan down, using aids, as cheating.

It's going to be tomorrow afternoon before I get a chance to have a clear go at this painting.

Dave

bjs0704
06-03-2004, 07:25 PM
The drawing is in burnt umber oil paint.

Dave - Your National Gallery trip sounded like it was a good one. My favorite beside Titian's Bacchus and Ariadne was the Rubens "Sampson and Deliah". Such incredible painting!

Barb Solomon :cat:

dcorc
06-03-2004, 07:32 PM
The drawing is in burnt umber oil paint.

Is it safe to mention b.u. yet? :p

Dave

Cayolinda
06-03-2004, 07:38 PM
Hello, I'm new to this site. I'm a beginner in oil portrait painting and thought this might be a good place to start for advice, constructive criticism, etc. I tried to start a brand new post of my own - but for the life of me, I don't see how to do it? Can you help? I have a major problem right now in a portrait I'm working on. Parts of it have an unusual, unattractive sheen. It almost looks like it's still wet even though it's pretty much dried. It makes me want to wipe it so it has more of a mat finish. But only parts of it look like this. What did I do wrong and how do I correct??? Thanks!!!!

bjs0704
06-04-2004, 12:05 AM
You can NEVER have too much burnt umber! :evil:

I have set up my paints, I am going to be doing the sky tomorrow. It looks to me as if Cezanne arranged his marks in the sky in several smaller clusters.

Barb Solomon :cat:

LadyJane65
06-04-2004, 06:56 AM
You can NEVER have too much burnt umber! :evil:

Barb Solomon :cat:

Hmmm, Barb, them's fighting words around here. Hope you can duck fast when old whatshisname reads this!! :D

LJ, that lil ole troublemaker, me!! :evil:

WV.Artistry
06-04-2004, 08:14 AM
may have to use a projector to get the angles right. Is this cheating??

LJ

Even Bougeureau is noted for occasionally using a device to outline the rough shape. That's what those tools are there for, and only useful for, M'lady -- the rough.

Richard

bjs0704
06-04-2004, 05:32 PM
I prefer to use grids to using a projector. Grids don't distort the way a projector lense does. But that is just my preference.

The important thing is that in the end you learn.

I was working on the sky and started to do the trees today. When I do my own painting, I prefer to keep the paint fairly smooth and not show a lot of brush stroke. For this, I have had to totally switch gears and be very careful about where and how I made the brushmarks. It's quite a change.:)

Barb Solomon:cat:

dcorc
06-05-2004, 09:42 PM
Having toned my board with diagonally scrubbed-on white + yellow ochre and let it dry, I did a charcoal drawing which I then traced over in french ultramarine, to get this:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2004/30792-dchouses1.jpg

Next, I used french ultramarine + white, cobalt blue + white, and cobalt blue + white + hint of cadmium red to rough in a sky, again in short diagonal strokes:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Jun-2004/30792-dchouses2.jpg

It goes against all my impulses to leave gaps of undercoat, and not blend - must resist...must resist... :p

Dave

artbabe21
06-05-2004, 09:45 PM
Bravo Dave! A good start! That's all it takes....:) Thanks for posting it!

LadyJane65
06-06-2004, 02:39 PM
Ok, got my drawing done, and the first layin of color. Hope I can figure out how to post these. Here goes nuttin:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jun-2004/41872-June_new_stuff_030_tiny.jpg

And this:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jun-2004/41872-June_new_stuff_031_tiny.jpg

And then this:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jun-2004/41872-June_new_stuff_032_tiny.jpg

C&C extremely desired. I can take it!!

LJ

dcorc
06-06-2004, 04:10 PM
I think that may hold the record for the fastest-gestating MOM yet, LJ ! :)

Dave

TeAnne
06-06-2004, 04:28 PM
Ok, got my drawing done, and the first layin of color. Hope I can figure out how to post these. Here goes nuttin:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jun-2004/41872-June_new_stuff_030_tiny.jpg

And this:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jun-2004/41872-June_new_stuff_031_tiny.jpg

And then this:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jun-2004/41872-June_new_stuff_032_tiny.jpg

C&C extremely desired. I can take it!!

LJ
Good for you LJ :) You are braver than I. :clap: :clap: I tried one of his still lifes once *ugh* You sure have done better than I ever could. :clap: Your colours are lovely too :)

Good start Dave :)

LadyJane65
06-06-2004, 04:30 PM
I think that may hold the record for the fastest-gestating MOM yet, LJ ! :)

Dave

Cute, Dave. This is faaaaaaaaaaaar from done. Just first layin of color. Lots of work to do.

LJ

PS, Thanks, TeAnne.

dcorc
06-06-2004, 04:50 PM
Hi TeAnne! - thought this one might particularly appeal, actually, being the closest to "contemporary" in the year's set - not having a go?

LJ - only teasing - keep going! :)

Cath - thanks!

Here's the next stage on mine - mixed up a set of piles of green - about half a dozen different ones (don't ask for the components of the individual mixes! - I have no idea!) - various combinations of phthalo green, cadmium yellow light, raw sienna, cobalt blue, french ultramarine blue.

Trying to do the greens mainly as hatched strokes, possibly as a couple of layers in places.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jun-2004/30792-dchouses3.jpg

Looks like some badly-behaved brat has had a go at my painting with felt-tip pens :eek: :D - hmm - this may be trickier than it at first appears!

Dave

IMNRTST
06-06-2004, 05:23 PM
great job everyone...wow you guys are moving so fast :eek: I haven't even started mine yet.....tomorrow i must begin!
LJ.....nice work....i love your choice of greens....care to share which ones they are? :)
Dave...cool effect you have going so far....i like it!
Mike

WV.Artistry
06-06-2004, 05:46 PM
C&C extremely desired. I can take it!!
LJ

My opinion is worthless --

But if you look at Dave's piece, you can see the initial development of the nude woman's back in the center of the piece. And if I were painting this, I would think that appropriate to (non)focus on with this piece, to give the unconscious its play toys.

Your woman looks too skinny because she's facing away, instead of an angled profile, and doesn't have enough diererre(sp?) showing on canvas.

I'm not sure if that helps :confused:

dcorc
06-06-2004, 05:58 PM
My opinion is worthless --

But if you look at Dave's piece, you can see the initial development of the nude woman's back in the center of the piece. And if I were painting this, I would think that appropriate to (non)focus on with this piece, to give the unconscious its play toys.

Your woman looks too skinny because she's facing away, instead of an angled profile, and doesn't have enough diererre(sp?) showing on canvas.

I'm not sure if that helps :confused:

And sometimes, a cigar is just a cigar, as Freud said ;)

Dave

WV.Artistry
06-06-2004, 06:13 PM
And sometimes, a cigar is just a cigar, as Freud said ;)

Dave


Dave, if she's smoking a cigar, I don't see it :)

Richard

dcorc
06-06-2004, 06:26 PM
For those puzzled by Richard's comments, have a look at http://www.painterskeys.com/clickbacks/subliminal.asp

Be warned there's some (subliminal :) ) erotic content on the page!

:) Dave

dcorc
06-06-2004, 07:01 PM
...And a bit further on:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jun-2004/30792-dchouses4.jpg

Still looks like nursery-school colouring-book - needs 2 passes?

This shows up the lower pigment-load of my usual alkyds, of course.

Dave

artbabe21
06-06-2004, 07:10 PM
Dave, I think it's just because it's NOT your style & you're trying to fit into someone else's that it seems akward! :) Looking good!

dcorc
06-06-2004, 07:29 PM
Thanks Cath! - I am quite enjoying it, but it's very different to my own approach, it's true. I am wondering, though, if I should have got some heavier-loaded trad. oils for it (the lighter load of the alkyds doesn't matter for the vaguely Old Masterish layered technique I mainly paint with - but here it probably would make a difference - again it will be less so for some of the other impressionists later in the year as they are painting more thickly than the Cezannes I saw the other day)

Dave

WV.Artistry
06-06-2004, 07:42 PM
What's a thread without a butt icon?

Not a perfect derriere and pose match, but close enough to show you what I see. And now I'll shut up about it :)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jun-2004/37442-Cezanne.jpg

dcorc
06-06-2004, 08:39 PM
You've shocked them all to their very cores, now, Richard! :D

Dave

dcorc
06-06-2004, 09:02 PM
Bit more paint applied! -

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jun-2004/30792-dchouses5.jpg

Dave

bjs0704
06-06-2004, 09:48 PM
Dave - You are doing great! I love some of the blue-greys that you are using on the wall. What colors did you use for that area?
:clap: :clap: :clap:

Lady Jane - I think that I like your color scheme better!:clap: :clap:

Richard - You may have won the prize this month for the most original interpretation! :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

It has been a busy weekend so I only have a bit done.

I have been having a time trying to keep my brushmark showing! Sometimes I have had to resort to added a bit of white and yellow ochre in spots to bring back highlights.

Barb Solomon:cat:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jun-2004/11410-cezanne1.jpg

ripper4
06-06-2004, 10:35 PM
Hey all

I have been away too long. You are all doing so well.

I just posted my 3 graces (a week late) and think I will try this one as well, but perhaps just one sitting so that I can get my homework turned in on time this month.

Nice reading!

Don

WV.Artistry
06-06-2004, 11:00 PM
Don, superb job on the May rendition!

Richard

peachcity
06-07-2004, 12:03 AM
Hello everyone and greetings from the Okanagan Valley, Canada.

Am newbie and want to jump right in.

Have done some painting (watercolor-a few years back) but want to use oils and this seems like a great way of getting focussed and working.

Have found all your information helpful and tomorrow will begin.

Regards, peach

artbabe21
06-07-2004, 09:29 AM
welcome to the oil forum peach...:)
and to our exciting project! Look forward to seeing your progress!

bjs0704
06-08-2004, 02:53 PM
It looks like I may be able to finish this today. I still have some areas to touch up. I have only blocked in the grass along the street so I am going to add highlights and shadows to those areas. It has been interesting to see the extent to which Cezanne exaggerated the planes on objects.

Barb Solomon :cat:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2004/11410-Cezanne2.jpg

WV.Artistry
06-08-2004, 04:02 PM
Barb, most impressive!

Yes, the overlapping buildings are illusionist eye-candy. Is that what you mean by "planes"?

Here's my rough sketch with Santa's lump of coal. Fire at will, my drawing skills are lame.

There is also a slight skew in the transposition to 18"x24" of 1/11th inch (approximately). My sincere apologies to Lady Jane, especially, since I now have have the same skewed problems.. ugh!

Ignore paragraph: I've been meaning to do an experiment, and this piece is as good as any to add chaos to. I'm giving it to my mom to water color, and I'll oil over that to see if any from the PRB era show up. Since this is not the best sample to experiment with, any value semblence of Waterhouse, Collier, Leighton, etc., will be worth the effort for the fusion technique conversation.

Richard

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2004/37442-2004_06_v1_ul.jpg

guillot
06-08-2004, 06:58 PM
Hi everyone. All the work is coming along so wonderfully!! Dave - very different for you !! I like it though :)

I'm still feeling somewhat uninspired by this painting, and I do not mean to come in spreading negativity - BECAUSE I'm going to do this one to, whether I want to or not, :p I'm sure I will learn something from it.

Great work everyone. I love these activities, and seeing what everyone comes up with.

Yes Richard , I see what you have on your mind, LOL. Very nice though - different.

Tina

peachcity
06-08-2004, 08:17 PM
Hello everyone,

dcorc, can I pick your brain? (what a horrible expression). I see in your initial drawing that within the tree forms you add lines in various places.

What I am wondering is your reason for this. Is it because they are in the original, or do they denote or indicate to you an area where later when painting you think shadow, or cool, or new form, or plane change, or something else?

Hope this is not a stupid question but would appreciate knowing your thinking if you have time.

Am enjoying seeing what everyone is doing. Just finishing drawing and later today will go over using ultramarine.

Regards, peach

WV.Artistry
06-08-2004, 09:07 PM
I see in your initial drawing that within the tree forms you add lines in various places. What I am wondering is your reason for this. Is it because they are in the original . . .


Peach, while Dave is sleeping in London, I'll take a crack at this answer.

It's basic impressionism.

A quick review of Monet's or Van Gogh's "impression" paintings will show you brush-strokes of these painting are generally a short line of paint, side-by-side with another color of a short brush-stroke line of paint in the same direction. With exceptions generally to sky areas, street areas, etc., the whole objective of this painting, like most impressionistic (whatever) paintings . . . is to "NOT" blend these lines, and colors.

These side-by-side colors and their directional flow make more sense when looking at the painting from across the room.

These lines are generally in the same direction for a particular object, person, or part of a thing, i.e., a tree branch. And the approach would be, not to paint "objects", but to paint that particular color in these short brush-stroke lines everywhere it exists on the composition. In essense, you're moving around the whole painting with each shade and color instead of painting things and areas.

The lines Cezanne is using, resemble more the longer Van Gogh than the Monet short lines. And like Van Gogh, Cezanne used multiple brushes (a thick, medium, and small), where Monet appeared to often use only a primary brush for the entire work.

Dave over-emphasized these lines in the development of his piece to show that it is an impressionistic work (I've been meaning to thank him for bringing that to my attention).

Thanks Dave,

Richard


*****
Blurb
*****

Impressionism [1867 - 1886]

The impressionist style of painting is characterized chiefly by concentration on the general impression produced by a scene or object and the use of unmixed primary colors and small strokes to simulate actual reflected light. Impressionist painting comprises the work produced between about 1867 and 1886 by a group of artists who shared a set of related approaches and techniques. The most conspicuous characteristic of Impressionism was an attempt to accurately and objectively record visual reality in terms of transient effects of light and colour. The principal Impressionist painters were Claude Monet, Pierre Auguste Renoir, Camille Pissarro, Alfred Sisley, Berthe Morisot, Armand Guillaumin, and Frédéric Bazille, who worked together, influenced each other, and exhibited together independently. Edgar Degas and Paul Cézanne also painted in an Impressionist style for a time in the early 1870s. The established painter Édouard Manet, whose work in the 1860s greatly influenced Monet and others of the group, himself adopted the Impressionist approach about 1873.

peachcity
06-08-2004, 11:45 PM
Richard,

Thanks for your explanation, blurb, and particularily the clarification on how to approach.

Regards, peach

Here's the beginning:http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jun-2004/44278-weblayin.jpg

artbabe21
06-09-2004, 12:14 AM
Richard...Dave never sleeps in London!! :)
Nice job on your sketch!!

Barb...very nice!! It's coming along...are you enjoying it or learning anything new? Please share?

Dave...very cool paint strokes...I like the pattering...:)

Peach terrific job!!

bjs0704
06-09-2004, 12:20 AM
Hi peachcity! It’s great that you have join us! I haven’t found this one too bad - it looked harder than it was! Still, I have learned quite a bit by seeing how it was painted.

Richard - Interesting drawing. It’s a good start!

I am thinking about how he exaggerated every flat surface by making a series of angled marks with his paintbrush. If an object is rounded, he translated the curves into flatter shapes. He seemed to do this in a couple of places in the trees.

The side by side brush marks often follow in the same direction as a particular surface.

Barb Solomon:cat:

Here is my final version:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jun-2004/11410-FinalCezanne.jpg

bjs0704
06-09-2004, 12:48 AM
peachcity - It looks great! Good start!

Barb Solomon :cat:

WV.Artistry
06-09-2004, 01:33 AM
Richard...Dave never sleeps in London!! :) Nice job on your sketch!!

It's 1:30am here Montanta, and I'm heading home for the night. Here's my rough sketch in water color.

Barb, thanks for the reshoot -- your previous pic was out of focus and I just about hurled trying to consentrate on it :) I'll need to study yours on how to get the sky through the trees, that's always been a problem for me.

Peach, anybody . . . This guy was smoking something when he painted. What is that crosswalk looking thing over by the left wall before the bend. Is it a bend in the road, or a culvert? Doesn't matter, but it's wierd painting things that don't make sense. That white/pink thing sticking up over the wall in back -- a tree stump, a giant finger, and under-funded room-addition?

'Nite

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jun-2004/37442-2004_06_v2_ul.jpg

twod
06-09-2004, 02:43 AM
sorry if this sounds stupid: what's the task for the month and could i enter it.if not now , next month.it's all confussing me! :D

dcorc
06-09-2004, 05:46 AM
sorry if this sounds stupid: what's the task for the month and could i enter it.if not now , next month.it's all confussing me! :D

Twod

have a look here:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=145985
which shows the development of the idea

and here:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=147797
which shows the list of paintings chosen for this year

Now during June, we are doing copies of a painting by Cezanne - see the start of the thread here: http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=192956
where I give details.

This would be a good painting to start on, as we are discovering it can be painted quite quickly - there's still plenty of time this month to do it, for anyone who hasn't started yet.

The original idea of these Master of the Month paintings was that we should try to paint them using similar styles and techniques to the way the originals were painted (Though several participants have painted their own interpretations of the paintings in their own styles and techniques - that's OK, we're cool with that too :cool: ) So what's the point of it? - well one learns a lot about how each painting was designed and painted - copying or interpreting a painting makes one look at it and think about it a lot more closely - several painters here who started by disliking a particular Master or Painting have commented that their respect for the work had greatly increased in the process of trying to copy it.

Dave

5thsister
06-09-2004, 06:14 AM
sorry if this sounds stupid: what's the task for the month and could i enter it.if not now , next month.it's all confussing me! :D

Hi Twod...I'll make a deal with you. I'll join you in this month's MOM. I'm a newbie to oil painting and this will be my 2nd painting. I tend to be a procrastinator but am pretty pleased with myself...I actually gridded my canvas and made the initial charcoal sketch just yesterday. Now to get started with the actual painting! I am very slow so probably won't finish this until sometime in July :p I'll attach a photo later...gotta get my son up for his last day of Kindergarten.

Oh would you look at that...I "graduated" to a new member status! Yipee! :D

dcorc
06-09-2004, 07:37 AM
Barb - you asked about blue-greys in the wall - my palette on this painting is

Titanium White
Yellow Ochre (canvas toning only)
Raw Sienna
Cobalt Blue
French Ultramarine Blue
Cadmium Yellow Light
Cadmium Red Medium
Phthalo Green

Some of the more muted shades are just complementary mud (i.e. a bit of this, a bit of that from the leftovers of the brighter colour-mix piles, pushed together with a bit of white, to get grey-ish :p ), plus a little cobalt blue for the bluer tones.

Yours came along splendidly, and quickly too! :clap: :clap: As you say, Cezanne's interested in breaking down shapes to planes, often marked out by hatched-in areas, and bounded in the starting sketch by dark blue lines. One thing, perhaps it's the photography, but the overall hue looks quite a bit bluer (or at least less yellow) than our ref photo - is this just camera settings, or a cooler palette?

Dave

dcorc
06-09-2004, 08:06 AM
Peach - you asked about lines - on the outline sketch I was marking edges in dark blue between what would be patches of different colour - especially between light and dark - because looking at the Cezannes in the National Gallery here in London, one could see that this was what he had done - this tells us that the broad pattern of planes/patches is something he had already conceived before sketching - though it's clear from both looking at the paintings themselves and from discriptions of the way he worked from eye-witnesses, that when he started filling in colour he would paint patches as a series of strokes, and perhaps look around the canvas for where else he could use the same colour, so that it was filled in piecemeal, and somewhat improvisationally, within the confines of the overall structure (makes it sound like jazz :p )

Good start!

Dave

dcorc
06-09-2004, 09:06 AM
Richard - a fascinating approach - looks richer and more interesting than the original! :) - I'll be very interested to see how it develops.

Tina - I applaud your attitude to "have a go, regardless" - I have to say I'm not greatly fond of Cezanne either - but half the fun, and experience, of doing these MOMs is to try to adapt and to use unfamiliar brushwork, texhniques, colour choices etc, etc.

Artbabe - of course I never sleep - I just climb back into my Borg alcove and regenerate from time to time, when things are quiet :D

LJ, J-Van and Ripper - how are you going?

5thsister and twod - welcome on board!

Dave

5thsister
06-09-2004, 09:13 AM
Okay...I have begun!

1st image is my gridded canvas (16x20) and 2nd image is yellow ochre scumble (is that the right word?) with the sketch done using the infamous BURNT UMBER (thinned w/OMS) That's all I'll be able to do until tomorrow eve.

Comments, of course, are welcome as I am just learning! Thanks!

dcorc
06-09-2004, 09:13 AM
Final straight with this one:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jun-2004/30792-dchouses6.jpg

and with a few last adjustments, pushing and restating some of the dark edges a bit:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jun-2004/30792-dchouses7.jpg

Finished, I think!

Dave

LadyJane65
06-09-2004, 09:25 AM
Final straight with this one:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jun-2004/30792-dchouses6.jpg

and with a few last adjustments, pushing and restating some of the dark edges a bit:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jun-2004/30792-dchouses7.jpg

Finished, I think!

Dave

Nope, Dave, you still have a teensy bit of tree to paint, or a blue line to get rid of. Second bank of trees from right. You'll see it!!

LJ

guillot
06-09-2004, 09:31 AM
Okay...I have begun!

1st image is my gridded canvas (16x20) and 2nd image is yellow ochre scumble (is that the right word?)

Hi 5th sister - welcome aboard!! That would be a wash :D It's OK :)

You have a nice start!!!!! Keep painting !!!!!

:clap: :clap:

Thanks Dave :angel:

Tina

dcorc
06-09-2004, 09:33 AM
Nope, Dave, you still have a teensy bit of tree to paint, or a blue line to get rid of. Second bank of trees from right. You'll see it!!

LJ

You mean here?

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jun-2004/30792-dchouses8.jpg

Have another look at the original! :D

Dave

5thsister
06-09-2004, 09:42 AM
Thanks for the welcome, Tina. Now that I've seen "Mr. Cool's" finished version, I have become intimidated...Such a wonderful work! :clap:

WV.Artistry
06-09-2004, 12:31 PM
Nope, Dave, you still have a teensy bit of tree to paint, or a blue line to get rid of. Second bank of trees from right. You'll see it!!

LJ

On closer inspection, it appears this guy wasn't actually smoking a controlled substance, but was in league with Nostradamus, downloading future Hubble Telescope pictures into his paintings.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jun-2004/37442-2004_06_a1_d1.jpg

bjs0704
06-09-2004, 12:32 PM
Cathleen - I have been trying to think what I learned this time around. First, while I studied Cezanne in school, he was never a big favorite of mine. As I did this painting, I found that most of drawing technique involved was surprisingly traditional. It confirmed my sense that the importance of good drawing skills.

Brushwork is really important for working in this style. The brush marks remind me of the hatching marks used in tradition pen and ink. It took a bit of discipline to concentrate on this aspect of painting.

The major thing that I learned on a personal level is that I may tend to use brushes bigger than I need. I ended up using a #2 hog bristle flat for most of this. In many cases, I was using the narrow edge of it (brushing sideways) to make the hatching mark. For my painting overall, I am going to have to work on using middle size brushes and small brushes more often.

Cezanne is the one credited for saying that everything in the natural world is made up of spheres, cylinders and cubes. There is a big emphasis of simplifying the rounded forms into a series of flatter shapes. I really enjoyed doing this in the trees. Apparently, when I do landscape, I am needing to be more conscientious of the form of the tree and the surfaces of the tree. I also need to pay attention to the sky holes and other negative spaces.

Barb Solomon :cat:

bjs0704
06-09-2004, 12:37 PM
Richard - I’m sorry about the photo. I must have been too eager to post something. :rolleyes: Actually, I hadn’t quite finished at that point, but my last post is of the painting in its final stage.

For the sky holes, I went back in with light blue paint to match the sky. I also added a cream colored paint that matched the canvas surface that I applied in places all over the canvas to regain areas where the marks filled in and highlights were lost.

The main roadway bends. It disappears at a point along the left wall - right about where the red building and the left wall are. On the pathway on the left side, there seems to be a rectangular platform - probably a platform used to fill in a muddy spot on the walkway. The road as a composition device is really great. I can imagine myself walking down the road.

The part that had me confused was the buildings on the right. Some of them are built into the wall. Some of them are partially hidden by the trees. There were a couple of places that I just plain got lost! :confused: I filled in with tree where I had to. :D :D

That white/pink thing sticking up over the wall in back -- a tree stump, a giant finger, and under-funded room-addition?

Is this the one that I assumed was a chimney to a building that I couldn’t see?

Barb Solomon :cat:

bjs0704
06-09-2004, 12:42 PM
Richard - You are VERY observant!

Twod - Hi! It's good to see you. I hope that you give the Cezanne a try!

You could probably grid this with vine charcoal (don’t use compress charcoal- pencil would be better). I find that vine charcoal is the least likely to show when I’m done. Divide the original into a 4 by 4 grid sections. Then do the same for your canvas.

Polly - Hi! It’s great to see you join in. I’m glad to see some new people give this a try!

You have a really great start! One of the hardest parts is done. (The Burnt Umber is a very good choice for toning the surface.)

Dave - Your “Cezanne” looking great! I think that I like your hatching marks better than my own. It gives the painting a nice “shimmer”.
:clap: :clap: :clap:

I was a little bit curious about the color. It was a really nice grey. - I think I used ivory black with a bit of ultramarine. I think that there is a lot of color variation in the photography of this painting. Most of the Cezanne that I have seen, have a lot of “yellow ochre” in them.

Sorry about the long winded post. Cezanne is never going to look the same again!

Barb Solomon :cat:

WV.Artistry
06-09-2004, 12:52 PM
The part that had me confused was the buildings on the right. Some of them are built into the wall. Some of them are partially hidden by the trees. There were a couple of places that I just plain got lost! :confused: I filled in with tree where I had to. :D :D

Is this the one that I assumed was a chimney to a building that I couldn’t see?

Barb Solomon :cat:

My buildings are also growing out of the wall further down on the right side. But I'm running with the morph. And I wanted to build a two-story town-home where it's lost in the trees, but was unable to get a permit because it's a historical district. Ditto, the gardener's quarters just peeking out behind the chateau with the large sloping roof.

I also have the partial development of a street lamp in the front right wall, with no anchorage into the street :) And those 4x4 concrete street signs used to be popular. Maybe that thing is a floating street sign pole, ey?

Thanks for the sky/tree tip, and good job with your shading and tones.

Richard

bjs0704
06-09-2004, 02:30 PM
And I wanted to build a two-story town-home where it's lost in the trees, but was unable to get a permit because it's a historical district.

Richard - Oh goodness! Too funny! (ROTFL) :)

I like my houses "growing" out of walls. :D It sounds like you have a reasonable interpretation. I am really looking forward to seeing it!

Barb Solomon :cat:

dcorc
06-09-2004, 04:45 PM
Thanks for the welcome, Tina. Now that I've seen "Mr. Cool's" finished version, I have become intimidated...Such a wonderful work! :clap:

Thank you, Polly! :) but please don't be intimidated! :eek:

Now I've finished this, can I put my Phthalo Green back on my "Unloved, overpowering colours" shelf - next to Phthalo Blue and Cadmium Orange, please? :p

Dave

WV.Artistry
06-09-2004, 06:18 PM
Now I've finished this, can I put my Phthalo Green back on my "Unloved, overpowering colours" shelf - next to Phthalo Blue and Cadmium Orange, please? :p
Dave

Do you want mine for the trophy room?

I'll start my oil tonight. Probably use the 20yr old, stepped-on, half-hard tube of unknown sap green I have for the majority of work (old faithful). An altered Olive Green or Greenish Umber might work for some darker tones, and Viridian for the lighter green tones. I'll stick with Venetian Red for the miscellaneous red/brown highlights. Repeat Indian Yellow/Naples Yellow/Chinese White.

In the water color, I used:
Indian Yellow (tube)
Naples Yellow (tube)
Chinese White (tube)
Green? (kit)
Red? (kit)
Purple? (kit)
Brown? (kit)
Blue? (kit)

ripper4
06-09-2004, 09:51 PM
Dave... I am in this month, but I am going to try and do it in one (long) session.

I have been blessed with some timely commisions. I am painting in Richmond Virginia for a few days painitng plein-air, so I hope that when I return I will have that decided stroke needed to do Paul C justice.

I can't believe this thread has over 100 posts already!!!!!

They all look great!

Don

LadyJane65
06-10-2004, 05:08 AM
You mean here?

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jun-2004/30792-dchouses8.jpg

Have another look at the original! :D

Dave

Oops, mea culpa, mea culpa.

LJ - who has to go amend her own version!! :D

J-Van
06-10-2004, 11:43 AM
Here's a glim at the sketch, sorry about the poor quality. It's actually a light cream base w/FUB lines.

Yikes! Just noticed The Hand looming up center left. Shades of an old movie -Peter Sellers was it?

Dave - I like it! Esp. the way you didn't blend the hell out of the trees and walls, I also suffer from a Pavlovish syndrome - WOOF! See, blend. Must resist,,,, must resist.

Barb - Nice interpretation. So soft and misty.

Richard - I agree w/ Dave ,,,, verry interesting ,,,,

Onward - woof ,,,

Jack

bjs0704
06-10-2004, 02:04 PM
Jack - It's a nice underdrawing! I look forward to seeing the rest!

Barb Solomon :cat:

WV.Artistry
06-10-2004, 03:12 PM
Onward - woof ,,,

Jack

You left out a "woof", and the correct phrase is: "Onward brave dogs . . . woof! woof!"

:)

Nice sketch. Anybody that can actually draw has my respect.

Here's my oil. Don't know what to think of it. I have no feeling for this type of painting. The only ghost I could see is the one I ignore. And yes, that's a shoe mark where I dropped it on my foot. It's on my to do list.

Palet: Indian Yellow, Naples Yellow, Raw Sienna, Burnt Sienna, Burnt Umber, Raw Umber, ChromiumOxide sp(?), Olive Green, Thaloe Green (for Dave), Whatever Blue and Same Old white.

Richard

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Jun-2004/37442-2004_06_v3_ul.jpg

WV.Artistry
06-10-2004, 03:20 PM
another photo view

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Jun-2004/37442-2004_06_v4_ul.jpg

bjs0704
06-10-2004, 04:42 PM
Richard - I really like how it turned out! It reminds me of Renoir doing a Cezanne copy! The color is wonderful! :cool: :cool: :cool:

You always seem to have a style of your own! Good job! :clap: :clap:

Barb Solomon :cat:

peachcity
06-11-2004, 12:12 AM
Hello Everyone,

Richard, love your painting. The softness, colors, mood. Makes me want to jump on my bike and ride down that road. And I shared your confusion about what's going on in some areas. Wonder why he did that...

LJ, particularily like your treatment of the building and the wall on r/h side of the painting. Thanks for your "newbie" tips in the other thread.

Barb, you sure seem to have "got" the forms and surfaces of the trees.I also really like the tones/colours in the walls along road and the mood. Thanks for sharing your thoughts on what you learned.

Dave, it's all been said! PS Any idea why the cadmium colors in alkyds are so much cheaper than regular oil paints? Have you ever mixed them with regular oils in the same painting?

J-Van, Ripper , 5th sister, twod , (hope I didn't forget anyone) look forward to seeing your progress.

More than anything this exercise makes me realize the need for a plan of study to learn about oil painting, so I have purchased the book "Oil Painting for the Serious Beginner" and will work through the lessons. Probably be back for the Hopper MOM. Love his work.

Regards, peach

Here's progress so far:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/11-Jun-2004/44278-webstg2.jpg

WV.Artistry
06-11-2004, 01:52 PM
Hello Everyone,

Richard, love your painting. The softness, colors, mood. Makes me want to jump on my bike and ride down that road.



Ride away :) Thanks.

Your have a good start with yours.

Say hello to Blaine, WA for me. Good memories.

Richard

p.s. Barb, I think in some forum I trounced Renoir in empathy for his lack in drawing skills :) I'll work on it!!

bjs0704
06-11-2004, 10:11 PM
Richard - I REALLY meant it as a compliment! I was seeing a certain softness and a combination of colors. YOUR drawing was great!

Now, if you want to razz Renoir and Cezanne a bit for their drawing skills...

Let's face it, this is a painting where houses sprout out of walls! :D

Best wishes

Barb Solomon :cat:

LadyJane65
06-12-2004, 09:30 AM
Nice start, Peach. Looking forward to seeing the next step. Going to try to get the next layer of color on my fiasco today. Been a tough busy week. Happy weekend, everybody.

LJ

5thsister
06-12-2004, 11:21 AM
Let's face it, this is a painting where houses sprout out of walls! :D


LOL :D That's why I have started with the sky! Will post an updated photo after I've progressed a bit more. Am admiring everyone's progress...very inspiring, and as I've mentioned before, a bit intimidating, too! :eek:

Have a good weekend everyone!

WV.Artistry
06-12-2004, 01:37 PM
. . .and as I've mentioned before, a bit intimidating, too! :eek:



We all do the best we can, and nobody is critical against anybody's best. Except for me -- I admit to criticism. Especially when people say "Be gentle with me". Argh!! But Karma chips away constantly, and I learn, and I also try not to be so critical of my own work (although that's sooo tempting).

Just have fun with it and let go.

As intimidation goes, I may not be the only one who has reservations about July's project by Thayer. I'd personally feel a big sense of accomplishment if my rendition anywhere resembles that ability.

artbabe21
06-12-2004, 01:52 PM
Richard - I really like how it turned out! It reminds me of Renoir doing a Cezanne copy! The color is wonderful! :cool: :cool: :cool:



That's IT! Exactly! I've admired some of Renoirs works & you have that softness to it Richard that is very wonderful....you're your own master! :)

Good beginning Peach! :D

5thsister
06-12-2004, 02:36 PM
Just have fun with it and let go.

What wonderful advice and a positive attitude to boot! Thanks...I am having fun! I have learned so much simply by lurking and absorbing the information from all the threads. As I mentioned in another thread, I have put on my thick skin regarding C&C...after all, how will one learn?

I've progressed a wee bit on the MOM. I've done the sky and part of the trees...many more layers of color to go...but I am taking Titanium's advice and leaving the thinner and medium out for the time being. Am finding it difficult to limit my palette but am trying: Currently using: Sap Green, Yellow Ochre, Titanium White, Raw Sienna, Burnt Umber :eek: Cadmium Yellow and Alz. Crimson. I know, not so limited but much more so than on my 1st oil painting. When mixing the "brighter" greens for the trees, I'm thinking of adding Cerulean Blue to the palette...am I on the right path?

Anyways, here is my progress shot so far...apologize for the lighting...still learning all the features of our new digital camera.

WV.Artistry
06-12-2004, 05:03 PM
When mixing the "brighter" greens for the trees, I'm thinking of adding Cerulean Blue to the palette...am I on the right path?



Dave used Thaloe Green, and I followed his lead, but I found it really difficult to control in this painting. I spent too much time fighting this color to tone it down. But it does seem to be the color. Most annoying, and it doesn't blend with the other colors. It dominates, full of treachery, and tries to coo the work like some non-indegineous plant (kudzu).

Maybe somebody has a suggestion for chemistry. A lightened Chromium Oxide?, or Viridian (hue) with yellow/white might be more manageable.

dcorc
06-12-2004, 05:25 PM
Dave used Thaloe Green, and I followed his lead, but I found it really difficult to control in this painting. I spent too much time fighting this color to tone it down. But it does seem to be the color. Most annoying, and it doesn't blend with the other colors. It dominates, full of treachery, and tries to coo the work like some non-indegineous plant (kudzu).

Maybe somebody has a suggestion for chemistry. A lightened Chromium Oxide?, or Viridian (hue) with yellow/white might be more manageable.

It's "Phthalo", as in phthalocyanine - which on this link is also an MOM - Molecule Of the Month :http://www.chm.bris.ac.uk/motm/phthalocyanine/pbpc.html :D

LOL - don't say I didn't warn you - one 37ml tube of the stuff is a lifetime's supply - and as for Phthalo Blue - I'm sure Picasso's 4 year blue period was entirely caused by him leaving the top off a tube! :eek: :D

Dave

artbabe21
06-12-2004, 06:17 PM
- I'm sure Picasso's 4 year blue period was entirely caused by him leaving the top off a tube! :eek: :D


LOL Dave!! :D

Polly, your is coming along well, nice drawing!! :) Glad that you have joined us! :)

JamieWG
06-12-2004, 06:32 PM
LOL - don't say I didn't warn you - one 37ml tube of the stuff is a lifetime's supply - and as for Phthalo Blue - I'm sure Picasso's 4 year blue period was entirely caused by him leaving the top off a tube! :eek: :D

Dave

Dave....Molecule of the Month...too funny!

Phthalo blue....I don't think I ever want to go near that stuff again! My entire plein air group worked off one 4oz tube last year and there's still half of it left! I'm done with it though....'too hot to handle for me.

Jamie

WV.Artistry
06-12-2004, 07:11 PM
It's "Phthalo", as in phthalocyanine . . .
Dave

Thanks for the spellcheck on Phthalocyanine. I'm re-labeling it Osama Green and putting it next to Allosaurus Crimson in the "caution" box.

Phthalo [pronounced Thay Low]. I thought it was originally an army issue color to field commanders with lisps, "Thay Low!!"

What about Modern Hookers Green? It's possible my presumptions on this name are also incorrect, but it might work in this painting.
(a blend of Phthalo Blue and Cadmium Yellow?).

dcorc
06-12-2004, 07:19 PM
Thanks for the spellcheck on Phthalocyanine. I'm re-labeling it Osama Green and putting it next to Allosaurus Crimson in the "caution" box.

Phthalo [pronounced Thay Low]. I thought it was originally an army issue color to field commanders with lisps, "Thay Low!!"

What about Modern Hookers Green?

Didn't realise it was a colour, I thought that was the name of the park in the red light district! :p

Dave

bjs0704
06-12-2004, 07:23 PM
Peach - I love the sense of sunshine in your painting! It’s going really well.

Lady Jane - What happened? Did anything bad happen to your painting?

Polly - I did the same thing! I finally had to do the houses just because they were driving me crazy!

Your doing great! It is looking very good! I really like the one tree! The sky holes are well done.

I used Ultramarine Blue and Titanium White for the sky and Viridian darken with Alizarin Crimson and/or Ultramarine Blue for the shadow of the trees and Viridian lightened with Cad. Yellow Lt. for the highlights. I may have used Cad. Yellow Lt. and Ultramarine Blue for the tree at some point.

Richard - LOL! Good comparison! The Pthalo colors to kudzu, not a bad comparison at all!

Dave - That is a VERY interesting theory of Picasso!

Interesting link! Gee, I thought you were joking about the molecule of the month!


Barb Solomon :cat:

bjs0704
06-12-2004, 07:26 PM
Thanks for the spellcheck on Phthalocyanine. I'm re-labeling it Osama Green and putting it next to Allosaurus Crimson in the "caution" box.


LOL! You must get a very interesting brand of paint! :D :D :D

Barb Solomon :cat:

LadyJane65
06-12-2004, 07:52 PM
Lady Jane - What happened? Did anything bad happen to your painting?

Barb Solomon :cat:

No, Barb, although I wish it would!! Just a long, taxing week. I hate having to work to pay for my vices!!

Put brush to painting today. Pathetic results, but will post when dry enough to photo.

Tired, wandering off to bed soon.

LJ

PS - everyone's efforts look wonderful!! :clap: :clap:

guillot
06-13-2004, 01:12 AM
Hey - no such thing as pathetic results, except for my own :p LOL

This is all of about 1 1/2 hours work:

I layed in the wash, free handed the composition with the ultramarine blue (you can see some things off) - trying to work quickly with this one. Then I started laying in the sky: Bad pics guys, sorry.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jun-2004/5957-Beginning.jpg

Then I came back and added in the dark greens:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jun-2004/5957-laying_in_darks.jpg


Then I worked some of the trees - still lots to do there - but this is all very quickly done:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jun-2004/5957-laying_in_greens.jpg

This is the FASTEST I've ever worked!! What a MESS!! :) Still lots of refining to do, and of course the rest of the painting to do. Late start - but I think I can finish this one relatively quick - I hope so anyway :angel:

Everyone's paintings look absolutely great!!!!

Tina

JamieWG
06-13-2004, 08:50 AM
Hey, Tina, way to go! Great to see you with the brushes in hand again. What size is your painting? I think the way you're going about it is the fastest way to fly, and it's exactly what I and many others do plein air: very light ultramarine/turp line block-in, put color in the sky, then hit the darks. Don't worry about the mess. Messes take care of themselves, just like they do around the house. LOL ;) 'Be back for the rest........

This one looks like so much fun...'Almost tempted to give it a go myself. Maybe if the weather doesn't cooperate for plein air work this week.....

Jamie

guillot
06-13-2004, 09:44 AM
Thanks Jamie it's a 16 x 20. Although this isn't my style of painting at all - I think the quickness will help to maintain some spontaneity without it looking too controlled - although maybe Cezanne carefully controlled his strokes - I have no idea. But looking at his painting, to me I'm trying to paint it in the manner that makes logical sense to me. So if this is the way you guys start off your paintings many times, well I must be learning something right then :) I've never painted en plein aire. Usually I'm such a stickler for all the little details.

Hope that you can find the time to do this one!!! Would be great to have you join in!!!

Richard - your painting is so beautiful. Your style comes through in all of your work!!! Very nice.

Dave, molecule of the month ... what a hoot. :)

LadyJane - keep going, don't get discouraged. You have a wonderful beginning.

Polly - great start too, will come along nicely.

I know I'm missing quite a few folks here - but honestly everyone's work looks great !!

Tina

guillot
06-13-2004, 11:09 AM
Here's a better daylight shot before I proceed .... the colors show up better ;)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jun-2004/5957-daylight_shot1.jpg

I'm off to see how much further I can get along !! Hey, my chimney stacks are off! :eek:

Tina

JamieWG
06-13-2004, 12:35 PM
...Hope that you can find the time to do this one!!! Would be great to have you join in!!!....
Tina

Thanks, Tina. 'Doesn't look too promising for me to join in, as I have touch-ups and framing to do if I get some rainy days, but I was interested enough in the possibility to do some research from books I have here at home. Those diagonal brushstrokes were key to his style during this period. He used a cream-toned canvas or paper primed with a cream commercial ground, which he left showing through in many areas, for a lot of his work around this period, though this particular one is on canvas. Most interesting, I found info on his palette for a landscape done just one year before this MOM landscape. That palette is:
zinc white, black
chrome yellow
yellow ochre
red earth (or possibly vermilion)
cobalt blue
ultramarine blue
viridian
emerald green
And possibly also:
naples yellow
prussian blue
chrome green

No "limited palette" for this guy it seems!!!

Jamie

J-Van
06-13-2004, 12:49 PM
Hi again-

I'm having trouble adjusting my photo to the 'canvas reality', but finally decided it was taking too much time so here goes nuttin'.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jun-2004/42060-cez02.jpg

Looking sorta washed out on my monitor, mebee still need some sort of alignment. I haven't any Th- or Ph- so am working with Viridian and mixed greens, my road should match the mid base value of Mr C's painting.

Also, decided that the 'lil Red House needed moving as did the larger one to the right.

Hoping for a sunny day for better pfotos.

C-ya

guillot
06-13-2004, 01:11 PM
Hi Jamie, well thanks for that info. Maybe some other month you'll be able to find some time to paint along with us!! Sure hope so. I'm using:

yellow ochre
terra rosa
No Black
Sap Green
Chromium Oxide Green
Perm green light
Naples yellow
Flake white
Ultramarine blue

and I think that's it.


Here's about 30 minutes more quick work:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jun-2004/5957-moving_along1.jpg

Looking great JVan!!!!

Tina

artbabe21
06-13-2004, 01:19 PM
Wow, you are really moving along quickly Tina! Speed painting 101! Looking very good...hope you get a nice quiet day to enjoy painting today!! :)

Jamie, thanks for dropping in...always good to see you here! Do you have a favorite MOM that you think you can do for sure? :) I've been blown away by the master pieces everyone here has painted!

Jack, I really like your start! Very colorful! Go for it! :)

Oh, TINA, we cross posted! Good going! You'll be done in no time! :D

dcorc
06-13-2004, 01:28 PM
All coming along well - a few specific comments:

Richard - your's does have a "Renoir" feel to it !

Jamie - hoping you can join in - of the year's selection, this is probably the closest to a plein air style - would be good to see what you do with it

Perhaps you should donate your half-tube of phthalo blue to the marine forum - they'ed manage to get through it eventually :)

Tina - "No Black" - so who makes that then? - I assume it's even more economical in use than phthalo blue? :p

Dave

guillot
06-13-2004, 02:19 PM
Tina[/B] - "No Black" - so who makes that then? - I assume it's even more economical in use than phthalo blue? :p

Dave

Uh, hmmm :confused: I guess the same folks that make Pthalo blue? :D

Thanks Cathleen! I hope I get more painting time today. Taking the girls to see the new Harry Potter movie in a little while.

So, this is where I am, I see MANY things that I need to fix. Thinking I should wait for all of this to dry, but maybe not. Am I fickle today or what? :D

I think I need a new dig. camera too :(

Update:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jun-2004/5957-almost_done2.jpg

WV.Artistry
06-13-2004, 03:35 PM
Also, decided that the 'lil Red House needed moving as did the larger one to the right.


Nice tones J-Van, and kewl abstracts happening in your trees. I'm sure it's going to be a winner.

Yeah, I also got building permits and the pink house into a dog-leg. Bought the condemned blue house with the delapitated overhang, and reconstructed, completed his construction of a room addition for a studio with good north light. Reversed his reversed light in a few places, focusing on a central light source -- east by northeast sun?

I used French brushes <<shrug>> Don't know if that matters but I like em'

Tina, I want some of the coffee you're drinking :)

Jamie, I was hoping you'd be painting this too, since you've got an edge on landscapes. It would've been fun watching over your shoulder. Thanks for the palet, and your Phthalo comments. I'm partial to a sky of Payne's Grey under French Ultramarine under Cerelium(sp?). Then if I need lighter emphasis areas, Royal Blue. It gives me depth, spectrum, and anomoly. I didn't do anything with the sky in this painting because I thought any overemphasis, would detract from the focus.

Biki, Barb, Dave, thanks.

Richard

dcorc
06-13-2004, 04:28 PM
Did you know i'm psychic? - Bernie's back! :p

Rosic
06-13-2004, 04:38 PM
Hey everybody! Just got back from my vacation today. Had a great time but missed you all. Man you guys have been busy! :eek: Some new faces too! :) I am impressed with everyone's work so far and hope to comment on each one ASAP.

I was able to finish mine while at our mountain home (where it still sits on my easel there drying as I type). Sorry no WIP shots... just the finished work.

What did I learn from this piece?
1... Had fun with this one... finally loosened some stokes.
2... Learning to see mi-nute details of color and shapes... hope to carry this over into painting from life someday.
3... Made myself work even when not in the mood and found that it doesn't take long to get into the mood. ;)
4... Painted for the first time with family (including Olivia, my three year old) around instead of during my private quiet time... and survived! I was amazed at how I could concentrate and tune out any distractions.

Bernie

20"x16" Oil on stretched canvas:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jun-2004/17108-momjune3finished.JPG

Close-up:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jun-2004/17108-momjune3closefinished.JPG

Rosic
06-13-2004, 04:40 PM
Did you know i'm psychic? - Bernie's back! :p
Dang you're good Dave!!!!!!
ROTFLMAO!!!!

WV.Artistry
06-13-2004, 05:16 PM
Had fun with this one... finally loosened some stokes.


It shows, really! Good observations.

Salute.

Richard

Rosic
06-13-2004, 05:21 PM
It shows, really! Good observations.

Salute.

Richard
As I was typing that line I was thinking... "Hope Richard notices". ;)
Keep me loose my friend.
Thanks...
I love the style you are bringing to this piece... especially your choice of color.
Bern

LadyJane65
06-13-2004, 05:22 PM
Hmm. Lost the first one, trying again.

This is full frontal round two:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jun-2004/41872-June_new_stuff2_001_tiny.jpg


This is a macro of the left tree bank:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jun-2004/41872-June_new_stuff2_004_tiny.jpg

And this is a closeup of the right half of the painting:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jun-2004/41872-June_new_stuff2_003_tiny.jpg

All comments and critiques gratefully accepted.

LJ :(

bjs0704
06-13-2004, 09:46 PM
Jamie - Hi! It’s good to see you!

Thanks for the “Cezanne” palette. That is VERY interesting!


Tina - It is looking great! That painting FLEW together! Good work! I can “feel” the wind in the trees! Your colors look great!

This painting DOES go by FAST! It is really amazing!


LJ - Good work! I like the colors that you are using for this!

Jack - I really like your drawing style for this painting! Your colors look beautiful - a bit like Japanese art! Good work! I look forward to seeing the rest!

I used viridian in my painting also.


Richard - Your colors are wonderful!

Bernie - It looks great! Everything is really looking good!

I was thinking the same thing about this MOM. Working the way Cezanne did, does make a person concentrate on light and shape doesn’t it.

Barb Solomon :cat:

guillot
06-13-2004, 11:06 PM
Tina, I want some of the coffee you're drinking :)

Richard

LOL Richard - sorry - don't use the stuff. :D I've never been able to drink coffee.

Bernie - Welcome Back!!!!!!!! Excellent work!!! :clap:

Barb- thanks for the comments. Still have some things to do to it, but not too much. It is the quickest I've ever painted anything!!!

LadyJane - looking wonderful!! Keep it up!!

Off to bed now. Everyone is and has done so wonderful so far!!

Tina

bjs0704
06-13-2004, 11:32 PM
Bernie - Welcome back!

Barb Solomon :cat:

Praire Rune
06-14-2004, 11:38 AM
This looks like so much fun. I want to do it, too! Do I just use the sample photo and draw a sketch from there? Polly, your painting is progressing nicely! All that I am seeing from everyone looks so interesting...the different palettes and brushstrokes.. :clap: My problem is time!!! Heidi

5thsister
06-14-2004, 12:26 PM
This looks like so much fun. I want to do it, too! Do I just use the sample photo and draw a sketch from there? Polly, your painting is progressing nicely! All that I am seeing from everyone looks so interesting...the different palettes and brushstrokes.. :clap: My problem is time!!! Heidi


Hey Big Sis!

I will email (PM) you the file attachment I have stored on my computer. This is a fun project and has done wonders for the confidence. I know you are busy with the art school and the kids but I bet you could find the time to do this project...It seems that many have been able to complete it in 1-3 sessions. With your expertise, I am sure it would be a quick project for you!

Love to you from your little sister! :cat:

bjs0704
06-14-2004, 12:41 PM
Praire Rune -Hi! Thanks for stopping by!

That is pretty much how I approached it! On the first page of this thread, Dave gives a link to a larger version of the painting. He also gives some good recommendations for the best working methods and colors to use. But give it a try!

It would be great to see your version!

Barb Solomon :cat:

Praire Rune
06-14-2004, 01:18 PM
Hey little sis! My other problem is that I am partially computer illiterate, but I am learning. My son just told me how to plug in my digital camera into the computer, so when I have the TIME I will send pics. I sat at the computer while talking to him on the phone, and sketched the project with vine charcoal. So the drawing is done :clap: I need to go and first finish "mi tarea de Espanol para la clase esta noche." My Spanish class is three hours long, and afterwards my brain ususally hurts "porque los verbos." :crying: And then I am going to paint the sky! Thanks for inviting me in, guys! Heidi

bjs0704
06-14-2004, 03:52 PM
Prairie Rune - It sounds like you have made a good start! :clap: :clap:

It will be great to see your painting whenever you get a chance! Good luck with the sky!

Barb Solomon :cat:

BERNIE BORSTEN
06-14-2004, 04:19 PM
I am a newcommer and watching from a distance how things devellop in this forum. Interesting. I plan definitly to do my input once I feel more at home. Thanks you noted that I was there...Hi to everbody, Bernie :clap:

bjs0704
06-14-2004, 04:46 PM
Welcome Bernie! It's great that you are joining us! It is great to have you watching us, but if you feel like giving this a try, it is really not too bad a painting to try to copy.

Barb Solomon:cat:

WV.Artistry
06-14-2004, 04:54 PM
This is full frontal round two:

LJ :(

Thanks for the full monty ;)

It's good progress LadyJane. A northern feel, but sensitive, pastel, and your color selection of the evergreen really sets a mood.

Richard

artbabe21
06-14-2004, 04:55 PM
welcome to WC and the oil forum Bernie...:)
Hope when you're comfortable you'll give it a try. Artists of all levels are welcome to this project!

Rosic
06-15-2004, 12:29 AM
welcome to WC and the oil forum Bernie...:)
Hope when you're comfortable you'll give it a try. Artists of all levels are welcome to this project!
And to think I thought you were teasing me Cathleen... :D
didn't realize another Bernie slipped in! :D

Welcome Bernie! :clap:

Bernie

artbabe21
06-15-2004, 12:44 AM
Welcome Bernie! It's great that you are joining us! It is great to have you watching us, but if you feel like giving this a try, it is really not too bad a painting to try to copy.


I read Barb's post at my computer & thought, Oh, why is she teasing our Bernie? LOL...:) You might owl! You must have had a great vacation!! :D

Rosic
06-15-2004, 12:55 AM
You must have had a great vacation!! :D
I sure did... the great thing is that I get to do it all over again July 2-12. :D
My wife is a teacher and if I didn't take my two weeks in the summer when she is off... well... I would miss spending it with my best friend. ;)
Guess I'll be doing my Thayer in the mountains too.
Well this night owl is off to bed.

The other Bernie.

LadyJane65
06-15-2004, 04:40 AM
Thanks for the full monty ;)

It's good progress LadyJane. A northern feel, but sensitive, pastel, and your color selection of the evergreen really sets a mood.

Richard

Thanks Richard.

LJ

IMNRTST
06-15-2004, 01:16 PM
Superb work everyone! :clap:
I still have yet to start mine and only have 15 days left in the month. O.o
Welcome back Bernie, i've been meaning to thank you for the postcard you left us...i was inspired by it and now am coming back from a white water kayaking weekend. What a fun sport to learn! I'm burnt to a crisp and look like a lobster....but fun nonetheless! :D
Time to go cut and gesso some masonite.
PS. For those who completed....how many hours would you say went into your works approx?

(I have to build a portable easel for my kayak now....and paint on the waters!...the views were breathtaking!) :p

Mike

WV.Artistry
06-15-2004, 03:11 PM
For those who completed....how many hours would you say went into your works approx?
Mike

3 Hr : Critique, shred artist with acid on my brush
3 Hr : Drink coffee, chide my cricism, think about yoga chicks meditating
2 Hr : Drink more coffee, look at naked women, think about rendition
1 Hr : Sketch
3 Hr : Watercolor
6 Hr : Glaze, Paint over watercolor with oil
5 Hr : Corrections, alterations, add footprint where dropped, remove footprint
1 Hr : Prepare for exhibit

24 Hr Approximate Total

Joking on some of that, but I really do work at a turtle-pace. Some of the other artists are more productive, I'm sure.

Rosic
06-16-2004, 11:08 AM
PS. For those who completed....how many hours would you say went into your works approx?
:confused: You know how you can get in a zone and loose track of time?...
I would guess about 7-8 hours on mine. This one came smoothly for me.



(I have to build a portable easel for my kayak now....and paint on the waters!...the views were breathtaking!) :p
Mike
Amen! Glad you had a great time on your kayaking adventure! I get to do it all over again in July. :evil: Here's a great photo I got of my wife and son heading out on their adventure. The timing was lucky enough to create a cool composition. :cool:

dcorc
06-16-2004, 11:24 AM
PS. For those who completed....how many hours would you say went into your works approx?

About 7 or 8 in total, across several short sessions.

Dave

bjs0704
06-16-2004, 01:00 PM
I think that it took me about 7 or 8 hours to do this. I did it in 4 sessions. But normally, I prefer not to watch the clock.

I found that this went easily and if anything went wrong it was easily corrected by painting back in. There isn't a lot of fiddlely detail in it.

Barb Solomon :cat:

IMNRTST
06-16-2004, 08:20 PM
Thx everyone, it's nice to have an idea of how many hours people put in to create such great works.
Bernie...great pic.....would make a nice painting :) the more i look at it....the more i want to get back out to the rivers!
see yas
Mike

JamieWG
06-16-2004, 09:45 PM
(I have to build a portable easel for my kayak now....and paint on the waters!...the views were breathtaking!) :p

Mike

Mike, <laughing out loud>....Go to the link for NYPAP in my byline, and click to see the "Members" page. Look at the first photo!

Jamie

IMNRTST
06-16-2004, 10:17 PM
haha that's it! it can be done! I'm on a mission now :p
Thx for that Jamie :)
Mike

LadyJane65
06-17-2004, 05:14 AM
Too funny, Jamie!! Now that's MY idea of plein air painting!!

LJ

stlukesguild
06-17-2004, 08:25 AM
I've been following this post with some interest, and having seen a great many Cezanne's over the years (in person and otherwise) I thought I would offer some of my own observations. I think its great to see you making copies of the "master of the month." Copying from one's predecessors is one of the best and most time-honored manners in which to learn. I would note, however, that the manner in which Cezanne built up his paintings was in most cases quite different from the approaches taken here.
The question was brought up about Cezanne's use of a yellow-ochre underpainting. I would think that either the photograph was skewed or the painting (or varnish) had yellowed over time. The idea of losing the brilliant sparkle of the white underpainting would have been seen as an abomination by most of the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists. This white canvas can be seen throughout Cezanne's paintings... his landscapes especially... in thinly painted areas where the ground shows through.
Perhaps the second thing I might note about his manner of painting is that he most certainly would not have worked one area to completion before moving on. Cezanne, like the Impressionists before him (and like such painterly older painters as Delacroix, Velazquez, Rubens, and Titian) would have worked the entire painting at once... bouncing color here and there, and not constructing it in parts like a puzzle (although fresco painters such as Michelangelo and Raphael, and artists such as Albrecht Durer, Leonardo DaVinci, Philip Pearlstein, and Tom Wesselman used this approach). I simply mention this because this "Impressionist" manner of "bouncing" color and working up the whole painting at once has become, to my experience, something of the standard academic manner of teaching painting in today's art schools.
Over the years I have had the chance to see a great many of Cezanne's paintings in person... in the National Gallery, Washington, the Met and MoMA in NYC, the Art Institute in Chicago, and the Coutauld Collection in London... as well as in the great Cezanne retrospective held a few years back in Philadelphia. My experience of these paintings has been that they exhibit a goodly variety of paint handling. The early figurative works are somewhat ham-fisted, but show that Cezanne may have evolved into a great Expressionist (and Edvard Munch or Van Gogh) had he kept on that path. The paint on these works is quite thickly applied... and reveals a very physical application at times.
His still-lifes are often quite built up as well (Cezanne is known to have spent months... even years on a painting). The paint on the various objects (fruit, vases, etc...) is often as layered... even encrusted as a painting by Rouault. The contours of the objects have often been drawn and redrawn so many times... in black or blue paint... that they assert themselves beyond the surface of the object, suggesting something of the leading in a stained glass window. I find that these paintings have an incredible sence of monumentality... rather like a nude by Lucian Freud, some of Chardin's work... or a Michelangelo figure.
Cezanne's landscapes (and late figures/portraits) are often much more open and airy that the still-lifes. Although they are also built up over great periods of time, there is a lighter touch. (Perhaps he was learning from his watercolors?) The general composition is often sketched in fluidly with a tenous blue line. The paint is applied lightly in straight short strokes... those "planes" of which they so often speak... which both seems to unify the painting overall, and give structure to the more organic forms of nature. I have learned a good deal from Cezanne here, having to recognize that my own paintings could often become overly organic... sensous... "mushy". The effect of these paintings... to my eye... seems to be to convey a sense of airiness, light, space... and something of the quivering effect of looking at something over time... noticing the slight shifts caused by visual perception. At least, this is what the cubists gleaned.
The question has been brought up as to how good (or not) Cezanne is. Of course, this question is always subjective to a certain extent. At the same time, it must be recognized that certain opinions are worth more than others. In Cezanne's case, it seems that it is the opinion of his predecessors that matters most. It would be hard to find a painter who has a greater impact upon his followers or was so admired by later painters. Picasso, Braque, Bonnard, Max Beckmann, Philip Guston, Lucian Freud... the list of later artists profoundly impacted by Cezanne's work would be quite extensive.
Personally, I have often seen him as a great example of the Protestant work ethic. He is someone of limited means... certainly no virtuoso... yet he kept plodding away until he pulled it off better than many with much greater abilities. Personally, I have always been drawn more to the work of such virtuosos as Rubens, Velazquez, Titian, Goya, Manet, Degas... Picasso. Still, I very much admire his work and respect the manner in which he was able to construct paintings of great monumentality... timelessness... and even profundity from the most basic of means.

loop
06-17-2004, 08:29 AM
just thought I'd chime in here
you guys are doing great, and for anybody thinking about taking the plunge stop thinking and just do it...no features, minute detail, face it, if he were to do this today, he probably would have used markers...that's what it looks like he did use anyway. :D


I will do this MOM...I will do this MOM...I will do this MOM
I will do this MOM...I will do this MOM...
I will do this MOM...I will do this MOM...
I will do this MOM...I will do this MOM...
I will do this MOM...I will do this MOM...
I will do this MOM...I will do this MOM...
I will do this MOM...I will do this MOM...

"nobody ever procrastinated their way to the top"..............but I'm gonna tomorrow.

LadyJane65
06-17-2004, 01:22 PM
I've been following this post with some interest, and having seen a great many Cezanne's over the years (in person and otherwise) I thought I would offer some of my own observations. I think its great to see you making copies of the "master of the month." Copying from one's predecessors is one of the best and most time-honored manners in which to learn. I would note, however, that the manner in which Cezanne built up his paintings was in most cases quite different from the approaches taken here. .

Welcome. Do post some of your work here. I am sure we would all love to see your paintings.

LJ

Rosic
06-17-2004, 02:05 PM
stlukesguild... Great info... Thanks!

BTW... any info on a Thayer you may know that you can share with us at the beginning of next month?... ;)

Bernie

artbabe21
06-17-2004, 02:13 PM
[B]stlukesguild... BTW... any info on a Thayer you may know that you can share with us at the beginning of next month?... ;)

Can you share any NOW? since I am ready to begin the Thayer since I will be gone quite a lot in July! pretty please?

WV.Artistry
06-17-2004, 02:32 PM
stlukesguild... Great info... Thanks!

BTW... any info on a Thayer you may know that you can share with us at the beginning of next month?... ;)

Bernie


Stlukesguild, it's June 17th? Bernie's got a point in the timeliness, that although you were polite enough, a lot of squawk needs to take place before the painting begins -- it's too easy to armchair critique now.

In fact, I would suggest initiating MOM July now, so we can start squawking exactly like this re: approach. Next months' MOM will be a simple painting for some, but imitating Thayer's "still life" with conviction, will be a daunting task for others. Just turn off the attachment function until July 1st, or something.

Additional suggestion: There are all levels of knowledge and ability on WC, and there might be more interest generated for next month's rendition if it was also presented to the novice lurkers educationally, "how to". Which doesn't interfere or conflict with the free-for-all mosh-pit approach to submissions :)

Richard

bjs0704
06-17-2004, 02:41 PM
St Lukes Guild - It’s good to see you again! I’m glad that you have joined us in the June MOM even if it is to just watch. It would be great to see some of your work!

Thanks for all of the good information on Cezanne.

Loop - LOL!!! That was so funny!

Barb Solomon :cat:

WV.Artistry
06-17-2004, 06:23 PM
I've donated my Cezanne rendition to be auctioned:

The American Business Women's Association, Four Townes Charter Chapter, in cooperation with the National Organ Transplant Foundation, will be holding their 3rd annual Art Auction on October 2, 2004 in the Cultural Arts Center of DeLand. The event will take place 6:00pm - 9:00pm EST at the Cultural Arts Center, 600 North Woodland Blvd. (U.S. 17-92) in DeLand, Florida USA.

The proceeds raised by the organization will be used for (1) scholarships awarded by the American Business Women's Association each year to graduating seniors and women who need further training in order to return to the work force. And (2) The National Organ Transplant Foundation uses funds to promote organ donor awareness and assist those who have had an organ transplant with living expenses.

guillot
06-17-2004, 06:42 PM
In fact, I would suggest initiating MOM July now, so we can start squawking exactly like this re: approach. Next months' MOM will be a simple painting for some, but imitating Thayer's "still life" with conviction, will be a daunting task for others. Just turn off the attachment function until July 1st, or something.



First of all, thank you STlukesguild for that valuable input. It is greatly appreciated.

Richard, I would rather "stick to the program", as it was initially agreed upon. If we start jumping ship now, and beginning them in the middle of the month, it could throw off everyone's schedules. Everyone knows that these start on the first of every month, and I believe that could cause quite a bit of confusion. We're trying to keep it structured. Matt had originally put all of these together from the get-go, so that all we had to do was post them when the month came along. Unfortunately, I do not know if he forwarded all to Dave or not? So, we may actually be starting from scratch next month, I'm unsure. Dave can you elaborate? I would suggest, though, that if we can get more educational information to post in the first part of the thread that would be fantastic!! I would suggest that they information be PM'd to me, Cathleen, or Dave so that we can attach it all together at the beginning of the month even if elaborating on Matt's original format a bit if provided - would be great!!

Thanks,
Tina

PS: All the paintings are looking wonderful - regardless of the approaches taken - I've learned quite a bit from it myself as I hope everyone else will continue to do so as well.

Well, I'll get all of it out of me in a minute, LOL. Richard - doesn't mean that we can't start a discussion thread on Thayer (discussion only) !!! Then we can merge that with the thread when it begins on 1 July!!! How's that???

Tina

Rosic
06-17-2004, 06:52 PM
Great idea and gesture Richard! :clap:

I've donated my Cezanne rendition to be auctioned:

The American Business Women's Association, Four Townes Charter Chapter, in cooperation with the National Organ Transplant Foundation, will be holding their 3rd annual Art Auction on October 2, 2004 in the Cultural Arts Center of DeLand. The event will take place 6:00pm - 9:00pm EST at the Cultural Arts Center, 600 North Woodland Blvd. (U.S. 17-92) in DeLand, Florida USA.

The proceeds raised by the organization will be used for (1) scholarships awarded by the American Business Women's Association each year to graduating seniors and women who need further training in order to return to the work force. And (2) The National Organ Transplant Foundation uses funds to promote organ donor awareness and assist those who have had an organ transplant with living expenses.

dcorc
06-17-2004, 07:57 PM
Hi stlukesguild

You make a lot of excellent points in your post - I would like to comment on one point specifically, however -

The question was brought up about Cezanne's use of a yellow-ochre underpainting. I would think that either the photograph was skewed or the painting (or varnish) had yellowed over time. The idea of losing the brilliant sparkle of the white underpainting would have been seen as an abomination by most of the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists. This white canvas can be seen throughout Cezanne's paintings... his landscapes especially... in thinly painted areas where the ground shows through.

I especially went to have a look at the Cezanne landscapes in the National Gallery in London (as I described in post #34 (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showpost.php?p=2381071&postcount=34) of this thread) - and one of my main motivations was to see what I might be able to discern about the colour of the underpainting ground, in the light of the colour in the photo - and the three I saw were not white, but rather a cream colour (on the NG website one is described slightly bizarrely as having a "warm grey priming") - I doubt that this is discolouration, as "Hillside in Provence (http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/cgi-bin/WebObjects.dll/CollectionPublisher.woa/wa/largeImage?workNumber=NG4136&collectionSection=work)" has near-white areas which are not similarly "discoloured" :)


Dave

artbabe21
06-17-2004, 08:02 PM
Richard, I would rather "stick to the program", as it was initially agreed upon. If we start jumping ship now, and beginning them in the middle of the month, it could throw off everyone's schedules.

I agree completely, this month IS about Cezanne! If Richard has any info on Thayer he can PM me....or perhaps I can look up something as I have to get going on this one.

dcorc
06-17-2004, 08:53 PM
I've just started a new thread on Thayer with some links to info, for those who are interested - http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=196786

:) Dave

bjs0704
06-18-2004, 01:35 AM
Richard - What a great idea! :clap: :cool: :clap: :cool: :clap:

Barb Solomon :cat:

LadyJane65
06-18-2004, 07:37 AM
I've just started a new thread on Thayer with some links to info, for those who are interested - http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=196786

:) Dave

Thanks Dave, always helpful to have this info upfront!

LJ

Hoofmama
06-18-2004, 11:37 AM
Many thanks to Stlukesguild for the wonderful information. I'm still thinking about starting, so for me, it was timely. I hope you will continue to share what you know on this site.

peachcity
06-18-2004, 07:43 PM
Hello again,

Has been interesting watching the progress and the great results.

JVan-the the subtlety of colours is beautiful.
Polly-welcome, how's it going?
Rosic- love the subtlety and harmony in the colours, and the "sculpting?" in the tree forms.
Richard- very commendable (the auction)
Tina- it's interesting (and educational) to see how you work the whole painting and it just keeps getting more real.
LJ- Really like the way your buildings look solid, their colours, and handling of the centre tree.
-thanks to all for Thayer info and links
Enough of my newbie comments...

This is my final.
There are areas I want to alter but it's just getting muddier and muddier. What to do? I've decided to leave it (for now) and start something new. As it said in another thread "paint and post, paint and post"!
Comments and crtitique welcome.
Regards, and thanks to all for guidance and inspiration,
peach
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Jun-2004/44278-webfinal.jpg

stlukesguild
06-18-2004, 07:48 PM
I especially went to have a look at the Cezanne landscapes in the National Gallery in London (as I described in post #34 of this thread) - and one of my main motivations was to see what I might be able to discern about the colour of the underpainting ground, in the light of the colour in the photo - and the three I saw were not white, but rather a cream colour (on the NG website one is described slightly bizarrely as having a "warm grey priming")

Dave;

Not having seen this piece as recently... or with as specific a goal as you I won't question you on the "cream" underpainting. I don't always use the same techniques myself, so I would expect Cezanne to be 100% consistant. Heck, it may even be linen with rabbit skin glue priming (and no white lead). I have seen this technique used by a number of painters, including Francis Bacon. Of course, I don't question the use of underpainting out of any dislike of the technique. I tend to begin most of my paintings with an underpainting od ochre, burnt sienna, white and black... before going full color. The Impressionists would hate such an approach.

Rosic
06-18-2004, 09:37 PM
This is my final.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Jun-2004/44278-webfinal.jpg

Simply Beautiful Peach! :clap:

bjs0704
06-18-2004, 11:12 PM
Peachcity - Good job! I love the greenery in the trees! Your color is great! :clap: :clap: :clap:

Barb Solomon :cat:

Biki
06-19-2004, 03:23 AM
This is a peach of a painting Peach. - You did a marvellous job. :clap: :clap: :clap:

LadyJane65
06-19-2004, 04:48 AM
...

This is my final.
There are areas I want to alter but it's just getting muddier and muddier. What to do? I've decided to leave it (for now) and start something new. As it said in another thread "paint and post, paint and post"!
Comments and crtitique welcome.
Regards, and thanks to all for guidance and inspiration,
peach
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Jun-2004/44278-webfinal.jpg

Peach, you did a wonderful job. I love the greens in contrast with your ochres. And your trees are nicely done, as well.

LJ

dcorc
06-19-2004, 05:09 AM
Peach - I think you did a great job with this - it doesn't look "muddy" to me! Definitely one of those "make a mark and leave it" type of paintings - which is a good discipline for "painterly" work

Dave

WV.Artistry
06-19-2004, 08:26 AM
Hello again,

Comments and crtitique welcome.


I'm a fan of Bouguereau, and he said something along the lines of:
-- I look at a painting, seeing all that I could do to correct and improve upon it, but end up doing nothing, because I know I can also make it worse.

It's not verbatim, but that's how he knew when a painting was finished.

:)

stlukesguild
06-19-2004, 09:10 AM
Rosic, Artbabe, et al...

Sorry... I can't add much with regard to Thayer's work... although I see Dave has already succeeded in offering the appropriate links. We didn't study the American Impressionists all that much in art history (a decade or so ago) and I have not looked at their work on my own in any real depth (although I will admit to a certain liking for William Merritt Chase and George Inness). I do have a question, though, about the artists selected for the MoM. I noticed that there were only two painters who were active post-Modernism: Hopper and Magritte. Neither of these are overly "modern" in their approach to painting. Hopper is a true realist who might only be qualified as a modernist by an extreme stretch of the imagination. Magritte is a Surrealist... yet with a real emphasis on the "real" aspect of that term. I guess what I'm wondering is whether there is an express intent to focus only upon "realistic"/figurative painting in this project to the exception of Modernism and abstraction? Don't get me wrong... I am a real fan of many "realist" artists... contemporary and old masters. My most recent painting efforts were quite "realistic" in approach. I merely wonder whether it might not be a learning experience of equal worth to attempt a copy or reconstruction of a few Modern and even abstract paintings? Perhaps something by Picasso or Matisse... or an abstract piece by Klee, Kandinsky, Miro, Diebenkorn or Gorky. From my own experience I must admit that I gained a far greater admiration for the artist's touch or handling of paint after exploring paintings by Guston, Sean Scully, Rothko, and others. They lead me to a new and greater admiration for the same elements in the work of Goya, Titian, Rembrandt, Rubens, Delacroix, etc... Just a thought...

elizabeth ours
06-19-2004, 10:47 AM
Even though it is pretty late June, I think I would like to try this one by Cezanne. I love the colors - jeweltones, and the style.

Can't remember where the original list is for MOM.

Is vanGogh on the list?

Elizabeth

WV.Artistry
06-19-2004, 12:15 PM
et al...

. . . I merely wonder whether it might not be a learning experience of equal worth to attempt a copy or reconstruction of a few Modern and even abstract paintings? Perhaps something by . . .


There's a thread open for 2005 recommendations:
http://wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=196826

I'm partial to some works by Russian artists, i.e., "Zaporozhian Cossacks Writing a Letter to the Turkish Sultan", 6'8" x 11'9" Oil by Elias Repin, 1878-91, Saint Petersburg Art Gallery.

That letter to the Sultan would fall short of ambassador skills of we deem appropriate today. ". . . The date we know not, for no calendar have we got. The month is in the sky, the year is in a book, and the day is the same with us here as with ye over there -- and thou canst kiss us thou knowest where!"

Elias Repin might not be a practical MOM project though. As I'm sure you know, it's not always what the jurors thought were the best works, that are selected, but what the jurors could actually agree upon. And likewise, the rejections are often, only what the jurors could not agree upon.

*********


Elizabeth -- look forward to seeing your post.

Richard

loop
06-19-2004, 12:26 PM
anybody remember Tenesee Tuxedio and Chumly ?? this is in my chumly voice

"duhhh hey Tenesee I did me a skecth of a sea-zan, duhh here it is "


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Jun-2004/6307-coal.jpg

loop
06-19-2004, 12:29 PM
of course I was in a rush to cover that abomanation up, so here it is so far

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Jun-2004/6307-roadside.jpg

it looked pretty good ,color wise, until I turned off my "ott-light" then is bacame dark and dull :crying: I had that problem before, I geuss I will need to redo my "studio" lighting :(

WV.Artistry
06-19-2004, 01:04 PM
it looked pretty good ,color wise, until I turned off my "ott-light" then is bacame dark and dull

What's an "ott light" ?

interesting color selection Loop, love the wall, not dull, and welcome to the wall morph club. the sky is great! old master style :clap:

would you mind sharing your palet?

artbabe21
06-19-2004, 01:14 PM
Great job Loop!! I really like your colors!! :clap:

Peach...well done!! Good you know when to stop...it's just right! :)

Hi Elizabeth! Hope you can join us! Van Gogh isn't on this years list but we are compiling suggestions of master for next year's MOM and you are welcome to add yours there. The months selections for the rest of this year are in a sticky thread at the top of the forum threads. :D

Please do keep the Thayer conversations on the thread Dave provided so people don't get comnfused...:)

Rosic
06-19-2004, 02:01 PM
Loop.... Looking good! :clap:
Bern

tubbekans
06-19-2004, 02:53 PM
Hi all,
Delurking and saying hi here. Way behind most of you, but figured I'd try this Cezzanne. I really enjoy looking at all your WIPs, so I guess it's only fair to share mine. Started this in early June and haven't got back to it yet. But really intend to finish it soon. Read DCorcs Cezanne notes after I started, and think I'll try the stripey painting idea. Sounds interesting.
Thanks for a great thread experience.. :clap:

artbabe21
06-19-2004, 02:57 PM
welcome to the project tubbekans and to the oil forum! :)
great start & so glad you have delurked to join in!

5thsister
06-19-2004, 04:01 PM
Peach and Loop...WONDERFUL!!! :clap:

Welcome Paul...a wonderful start, I see :)

Rosic...glad you're back from the wilds.

Everyone has really done superb work. I find it interesting the differences in all the end results...despite trying to emulate the "master", each one has it's own unique personality and style.

I am newly inspired to continue on mine...I am ready to begin on the houses and "retaining" walls, that is, if my building permit hasn't expired:D

I will post follow up pictures when I get a little further along.

PS...Happy Father's Day to all of you dads out there!

loop
06-19-2004, 04:09 PM
What's an "ott light" ?

interesting color selection Loop, love the wall, not dull, and welcome to the wall morph club. the sky is great! old master style :clap:

would you mind sharing your palet?

Ott lite http://www.ottlite.com/usage.asp?category=paint

I used viridian, colbalt blue, vermillion hue, Burnt sienna ;Yellow ohcre; cad yel pale and flake white.
18"X14" I used a #6 short flat hog brush.

that's funny what you say about the sky, the sky is mostly the Yellow Ochre grounds with some scrubby looking blue streaks :D I have attached a somewhat blurry close up.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Jun-2004/6307-roadsidesky.jpg

I'm gonna let this dry and probably come back to re establish some darks

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Jun-2004/6307-roadside_c.jpg


glad you joined the project tubbekans .

elizabeth ours
06-19-2004, 07:17 PM
Loop, it's looking good. Can't wait to see the finished work.

Elizabeth

bjs0704
06-20-2004, 12:31 AM
Elizabeth - It would be great if you could join us! It goes pretty quickly!

Loop - Oh goodness, did you watch them too?

Your “Cezanne” is looking pretty good. The trees are looking really great and it has the look of a quiet peaceful town.

I am looking forward to seeing how it turns out.

Paul - Welcome! You have got a really good start! I like how the trees are coming along! I can’t wait to see your progress!

Polly - It is interesting to see the slight differences in color choices and working styles of everyone when they do the MOM’s.

Barb Solomon :cat:

guillot
06-20-2004, 09:40 AM
tubbekans - glad to see you on board and delurking :D Great start there.

Loop! Looking good too !!!

:clap: :clap:

Tina

guillot
06-20-2004, 11:29 AM
OK guys, I'm finished, I think. Total of 3 hours. Really loved playing around with the diagonal strokes on this one. Liked the palette too. A greater appreciation for this painting and I've learned more about leaving the strokes alone once you put them down. You guys know I just love BLENDING :evil:

Anyway, here is my effort:

Thanks,
Tina

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Jun-2004/5957-completed_outside2.jpg

artbabe21
06-20-2004, 11:47 AM
Wow...Tina this is terrific! :D Glad you finished ! :clap:

Loop, looking great, nice colors!

WV.Artistry
06-20-2004, 12:07 PM
I just love BLENDING :evil:


You have my empathy.

It's a difficult to thing to suppress. But the reward of executing brush stokes instead of fumbling through a process hoping something will go right -- is visable in the finished work.

I can look at my stuff and see where I fumbled through a blend, and where I executed. And I'm still losing battles :) Maybe I should get a sticky for my easel, "You blend, you die". And just walk away when I feel the impulse... or have a canvas on the side that I can blend something, anything, just to get it out of my system.

It looks like you studied this painting with a high amount of scrutiny.

Curious, how come you didn't slope the blue house? I didn't either.

bjs0704
06-20-2004, 04:44 PM
Tina - It looks really good! :clap: :clap: :clap:

You have done an all round good job! The trees have a wonderful feel to them and your choice of colors gives it a wonderful atmosphere! :cool:

I really prefer more blended styles myself.

But as I doing this MOM, I keep remembering my first art teacher saying that the direction of the hatching has a big influence on how we perceive the volume of objects. He went on to say that even when we don’t see the mark, as is often the case with brush marks in oil painting that this suggestion of volume is still there. I found Cezanne interesting because he exaggerated that tendency so much.

I am also told that the French academy in the early 19th century put a great stress on learning to draw with hatch marks in ink.

Still, I want to go back to a more blended style of painting! :)

Your painting looks wonderful! :clap: :clap:

Barb Solomon :cat:

guillot
06-20-2004, 11:52 PM
Curious, how come you didn't slope the blue house? I didn't either.

Thanks Richard, Whoops!! It started as a slant :) It's actually not straight, yet not slanted enough, values are off most definitely. Don't know if I'll go back to fix it though - I think I've learned what I can from it. Glad to have painted it!!! I love paintings that you can stand a distance from, and all the colors just seem to mix together - the closer you get you see all the little strokes, etc.


Thanks ((Cathleen)) !!

Hi Barb and thanks. Yes, the hatch marks I found most intriguing in this painting, and quite fun to do. Interesting concept you've shared with us from your art teacher. I know we tend to remember these things in drawing, but hardly in painting. Van Gogh also comes to mind, with all of those little strokes. I think this is the only painting I've ever done without any blending at all, and the quickest painting I've EVER done. The Zorn - some blending but lots of left-alone strokes as well. Something maybe to retain from this lesson - although I also prefer, and/or just can't stop myself :evil: from blending. Don't believe there will be much blending in that Thayer either though !!!!!

Thanks guys,
Tina

Rosic
06-21-2004, 08:14 AM
OK guys, I'm finished, I think. Total of 3 hours.
Anyway, here is my effort:
Thanks,
Tina

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Jun-2004/5957-completed_outside2.jpg
Superb Tina! :clap: :clap: :clap:

tubbekans... Glad you joined in! Off to a great start!

Loop... Yours is coming along nicely.

5thsister
06-21-2004, 07:15 PM
[QUOTE=guillot I think this is the only painting I've ever done without any blending at all[/QUOTE]


:eek: You mean we weren't suppose to do any "blending" :confused:
As a newbie, I have so much to learn!!!!!

guillot
06-21-2004, 10:43 PM
I think this is the only painting I've ever done without any blending at all


:eek: You mean we weren't suppose to do any "blending" :confused:
As a newbie, I have so much to learn!!!!!

Ah girl - there were no "rules" :D Most important thing - learn something from it - take what you can from it - compositionally, technique-wise, color-wise; whether you blended some or not!!! No big deal :angel:

Thank you Bernie :cat:

Keep at it Loop - Looking wonderful !!

Everyone - just wonderful - fantastic stuff ;)

Tina

elizabeth ours
06-23-2004, 10:49 AM
Cezanne - what fun. I loved the hatching of the trees. His colors are brilliant - jewel-like - my favorites. No blending - don't know why, but I like the clear-cut interruption of color to color (my brain must enjoy this).

Anyway, here is mine - still need some color correction, among other things. This sure was fun, and I might do it again.

Thayer next month - don't think I'll try that one - roses are too close to my heart - couldn't stand it if I couldn't get it right, but really do look forward to seeing others, and may be interested in a buy.

Elizabeth

artbabe21
06-23-2004, 11:21 AM
Terrific job Elizabeth!! :clap:

bjs0704
06-23-2004, 10:32 PM
Elizabeth -It’s wonderful! There are very nice colors and a warm mood in your painting.

I found that the hatching exaggerated the shape of things. It made the “sides” of things like the trees more obvious.

Barb Solomon

Annick
06-24-2004, 01:12 AM
Hello everyone!

Have been reading all your messages (all 15 pages!). Cezanne happens to be an obsession of mine and I have bought many books on his technique over the past year. I am no expert (REALLY!) - I am a beginner at painting, but not at appreciating art... Have been painting since April 2003 only. I found every comment stimulating (well, maybe not ALL to the same degree - but still had me glued to my computer screen for the past hour and a half). I might --- even this late in the month --- try this painting also. If not, I'll try and catch up for July. Thanks for your generous spirits and for making painting so much fun! I will not miss my painting classes as much if I can gleam suggestions will being here! :clap: And please excuse my english if I use some expressions incorrectly. My mother tongue is french.

Looking forward to participating... and hoping for courage enough to share my "chef d'oeuvres" (master pieces in french) with you all - please be merciful to this beginner!

Annick ;)

artbabe21
06-24-2004, 01:52 AM
welcome to WC, the oil forum and the MOM project Annick!! You are absolutely welcome to paint this work & I hope you do, don't be discouraged, I haven't finished the three graces yet.....but remember nobody is here to judge, you are your own judge, not us. We all try our best and learn a little with each...it's a tried & true method dating back many years with much success!! Best of luck to you & we're her so just holler!

Annick
06-24-2004, 03:36 AM
Hope this works, 'tis my 1st attempt at posting a picture. Rough draft... colors later!

Annick

c:\capture_00002.jpg

Biki
06-24-2004, 04:42 AM
ooowww - it didn't work.!!!

try again? :)

dcorc
06-24-2004, 04:56 AM
Annick - welcome - when you use the uploader, you need to click on the button "upload" after you have browsed to the location on your own computer (at the moment the file is being pointed to on your own C:\ drive! :) )

Have a look again at the instructions here: http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=138344

Dave

WV.Artistry
06-24-2004, 07:48 AM
. .And please excuse my english if I use some expressions incorrectly. My mother tongue is french.
.
.
Annick ;)

bonjour Annick

Rosic
06-24-2004, 08:49 AM
Elizabeth... Love your rendition of this one. I enjoy seeing everyone's style come through on these MOM pieces.

Annick... Welcome. I look forward to seeing your sketch once you get the up-loader figured out. I'm like you... very new to oils. I just started in January and owe almost everything I know to working in this MOM series. I would call this a school vs a project. Never to late to jump on-board and we are going to do it again next year. :D

Rosic

WV.Artistry
06-24-2004, 09:41 AM
. . . No blending

Thayer next month - don't think I'll try that one - roses are too close to my heart - couldn't stand it if I couldn't get it right, but really do look forward to seeing others, and may be interested in a buy.

Elizabeth

Your Cezanne work has a freedom to it that my lacked. Most interesting. I struggle against my own impulse to blend -- and can see the little successes where I've resisted temptation :)

Thanks for the post. I'll try to do justice to the Thayer piece next month knowing somebody out there likes roses. Mine is sold already in advance of painting it -- a good thing, because now I can afford to paint it.

Richard

Annick
06-24-2004, 10:49 AM
OK! I think I have it now... sorry!

I've already learned something and it hasn't been 24 hours yet!

Dave = Thank you for the instructions.
Cathleen, Rosic, Richard... everyone = thanks for the welcome!

Annick :D

artbabe21
06-24-2004, 01:34 PM
OK, now we'll have to teach you to upload the photo so we can see it when we reply.....those direstions are in one of the stickies at the top thread (which needs to be updated since it was before the quick links...anyway it is a drop down menu to the top right of a page, click on it, it's a drop down menu with uploader at the bottom (this is when you have your reply post open) a page will open with the browse and thet rest is in the sticky.

Terrific start on your Cezanne! :)

bjs0704
06-24-2004, 02:18 PM
Annick - Welcome! I am very glad that you have joined in!

You have a good start! You have done the basic “drawing” really well and your light/ darks look really good! I am looking forward to seeing how it turns out! :clap:

Richard - Congratulations on the sale! Sold in advance? Is this a commision? :clap: :cool: :clap:

Barb Solomon :cat:

Annick
06-24-2004, 02:36 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/24-Jun-2004/45141-MOM_June_Wet_Canvas_2.jpg

Hope I got it right this time around!

Worked on the sky and trees alla prima this afternoon. Hope to do more today.

Annick

WV.Artistry
06-24-2004, 02:52 PM
Hope I got it right this time around!
Annick

Annick -- Beau vert(s).

Vous pouvez me dire cette couleur ?

Veuillez excuser mon langue française incorrecte. Ma langue maternelle est anglaise.

Richard

Annick
06-24-2004, 03:03 PM
I used a tube of sap green I want to get rid of (too yellowish to my taste, but bought it a year ago, before I knew better - my first painting, a landscape, I want to forget --- looked like fluorescent greens and yellows). So... the sap green mixed with lots of cobalt and ultramarine. a bit of viridian in some places as well... and then for paling the dark green --- lighter colors, used yellow ocher and a tiny bit of white, naples or cadmium yellow pale hue (sometimes a bit of two).

I went to see the Ermitage exposition in Montreal in the spring of 2003 and there was the "Big Pine" by Cezanne. I stood in front of it for almost 15 minutes. He used Ultramarine and cobalt blues quite a lot in his greens. Unfortunately, the book I bought in which it is featured doesn't render the richness of his colors that well. It is quite another thing to see it in person.

Thanks for asking - makes me feel almost like I know what I'm doing or talking about. Colors are hard for me to control. And drawing need some improvement!!! But this piece was easy enough in my view --- you can't really distort walls like you could a portrait. Never tried one yet but am not in a hurry to try!

Annick ;)

Annick
06-24-2004, 06:29 PM
I'm almost done, but I can't touch it anymore for today, everything is wet! (you can tell by the reflexion the flash made on the canvas...)

Any suggestions to improve it?

BTW, I decided to let go of the "chimney" or is it someone's finger sticking out between the red house and the blue roof? I'm not sure about the blue patch at the end of the road either. If I knew what it was, it might make more sense... but it bothers me a little.

I can't add any additional highlights or darks before a couple of days. Hope to have your insights. This was one of the fastest pieces I ever did. I believe it is my 7th painting (if I disregard the 3 I did not finish...). I love having a day off...

Hope to read you soon,

Annick :)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/24-Jun-2004/45141-MOM_June_Wet_Canvas_3.jpg

elizabeth ours
06-24-2004, 07:17 PM
Annick

Beautiful. Cezanne is fun to paint. I plan more. Got a book from the library.

That blue strip at the far left of the painting - I wonder if that is a spot where the road was repaired (did they repair roads in those days ??) I thought maybe it was a shadow, but then the light would be in the wrong direction.

This is a good question for some of our mentors to answer. Just what do you think that blue strip at the far left of the photo is?

Elizabeth

5thsister
06-25-2004, 10:40 AM
Excellent work, Annick! :clap: :clap: And so quick, too!

I do believe I am finished. This was an interesting study and one which I think suited me for my 1st MOM project...I learned a tremendous amount regarding color mixing and composition. I really enjoyed myself! So without further ado....I present my 2nd attempt at oil painting:

dcorc
06-25-2004, 11:33 AM
Well done, all ! - especially Polly, Annick, and Elizabeth! :clap:

Anyone still working on theirs? - J-Van? BernieB? tubbekans? (have I forgotten anybody? - sorry, if so!)

Good to have more new people joining in as well as us "old-timers" :p

If there's anyone who hasn't started yet but is tempted to have a go at this painting, there's still time within the month - I think it's fair to say most people's experiences is that this can be painted pretty quickly, and is fun to do.

Dave

loop
06-25-2004, 01:43 PM
Mine is sold already in advance of painting it -- a good thing, because now I can afford to paint it.

Richard



That is rich Rich, did you get a deposit ?!?

bjs0704
06-25-2004, 02:33 PM
Polly - It looks great! Your colors create such a warm feel to the whole painting! :clap: :clap: :clap:

Barb Solomon :cat:

WV.Artistry
06-25-2004, 02:34 PM

5thsister
06-25-2004, 03:47 PM
Polly - It looks great! Your colors create such a warm feel to the whole painting! :clap: :clap: :clap:

Barb Solomon :cat:

You are too kind, Barb. Thank you.

Rosic
06-25-2004, 03:49 PM
Annick & Polly... Congrats... you both have gotta be pleased with your results! I am! ;)
Bernie

IMNRTST
06-25-2004, 08:05 PM
Annick....Welcome.....truly nice work....it looks so real! (Love Montreal btw....I'm right next door in Ottawa =P) Ma premiere langue est le Francais aussi =)
Polly.....looks real good!....especially for only a second painting... cheers
Everyone else outstanding job! :clap:

I've been quite busy this month but managed to get a few layers of paint on some masonite all the while trying to stay as loose as possible (which felt quite unnatural) I'm still too new to painting to know what my style is but i do know that this ain't it :p lol
The act of painting this felt quite liberating though....very therapeutic :D
Here's what i came up with...it needs another layer...but this is all the time i have for this one.
2 things i like .........the movement in my sky.......the deep shades of greens
2 things i dislike.......too much mud in general......yellow at the left is too vibrant
Others likes and dislikes about this painting are absolutely welcome! :)
Best way to improve!
Mike

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/25-Jun-2004/39999-WC1.jpg

Annick
06-25-2004, 08:05 PM
POLLY : I like your interpretation... You gave it your personal touch. I shoud have done like you and forget about the crack in the left wall. My husband asked me what it was before I showed him the original. I could still improve that part a bit to make it look like what it is! Or then just "erase it" since it "steals the show" and draws the eyes there instead of the end of the road (that red house seems to be the focal point... or am I wrong?)

RICHARD : Bonjour. Votre francais est vraiment bien articule (sorry that I don't use the "french accentuated characters", I wasn't sure you'd have them on your computer). Thanks for welcoming me in French, I was touched. I was impressed that you knew so much! Love both of your renditions of the Cezanne - even if you prefer other styles. Very different... I like your way of interpreting his subject.

ROSIC : Thank you. There is so much to learn. A painter friend of mine told me that I needed to paint + or - 500 paintings before I could master painting and find my own "personal style". 7 done, only 493 left to do!

I need to improve my drawing skills badly. You'll see how much with the next MOM for sure. I might make the roses look more like peonies! ... You should see the rose I tried to paint once... disgarded!!! MUST MUST MUST improve. *sigh* But I will try anyway. Might start this weekend to have a head start! Thank God for the grid technique of drawing...

I'm so glad I found this site for this particular month - June's MOM seems to be the easiest this year... Less intimidating. ;)

I might keep using the sap green (I have a 200 ml - 7 on. tube!) with viridian or blues... so much easier than ultramarine + ochers... I think I might be reconciled with it.

Sorry for the long comments... Since I'm so new, I will be less and less narrative as time goes by. Thanks to all for your patience with newbies. :)

Annick

Rosic
06-25-2004, 08:16 PM
ROSIC : Thank you. There is so much to learn. A painter friend of mine told me that I needed to paint + or - 500 paintings before I could master painting and find my own "personal style". 7 done, only 493 left to do!
Annick
:D :D I'm only a couple ahead of you... at this rate I'll be a master painter at age 68... LOL! :D

Mike... super job! Thanks for sharing your painting and comments.

Bern

Annick
06-25-2004, 08:16 PM
Hi Mike!

Contente d'avoir un autre francophone... but I'll stick to english since 'twould be a bit rude of me to write in french when others can't read. Really like your left wall. You say you're new to painting too? Find your rendition very good!!! And you were more faithful than me to the style for the trees and sky... That's why I'll pick another Cezanne (maybe the Big Pine I talk about in a previous message)... Then I can practice and study his technique with flat paintbrushes... Very clear in the big pine painting. Cubism coming soon... to a canvas near you!

Anyway, write to you all later sometime soon... when I've started my July MOM and am a bit more advanced with it. Those roses... aaaaargh! Hope I don't make them look trampled...

Annick

dcorc
06-25-2004, 08:24 PM
Mike - good finish there! no crits from me. :) - you've self-critiqued it well (are you going to knock back that yellow a touch, or just leave it be?).

Annick - I think the red house is the focal point.


People were asking what the blue patch on the road is - I've no idea - a pool of water perhaps in a slight dip? The spot where they dug to put in cable TV for Cezanne :eek: :D ?

One thing does strike me about it though - it serves to lead the eye straight down the road to that red house, rather than allowing it to sweep off to the left, as we would in its absence.

Dave

Rosic
06-25-2004, 08:30 PM
People were asking what the blue patch on the road is - I've no idea - a pool of water perhaps in a slight dip?

One thing does strike me about it though - it serves to lead the eye straight down the road to that red house, rather than allowing it to sweep off to the left, as we would in its absence.

Dave
Great observation Dave... So true.

artbabe21
06-25-2004, 08:33 PM
Annick...terrific job!! :D Sap green is our friend...I love that color straight for trees! Good you have a leg up on the roses.
I SO wish I could parlez beau francais!! Just high school words here & there but t'was helpful in Paree.

Polly...I love the subtle differences in each, you've done a wonderful job!

Mike...now you're a master, see?? Great job on yours!! :)

WV.Artistry
06-25-2004, 08:40 PM
:... at this rate I'll be a master painter at age 68...
Bern

Bernie

"There are no great painters -- only old ones".

Richard

Annick
06-25-2004, 08:43 PM
Cezanne's LE GRAND PIN (THE BIG PINE or THE GREAT PINE?) : my husband just found another one entitled "The Great Pine" which could be a translation to "Le Grand Pin"... how many were there??? The one in the book I bought is the one I saw in Montreal... with so much transparent ultramarine and viridian... (colors not well rendered in my book). I thought titles to paintings were unique?

This link is the Great Pine... which is different from mine.
http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/cezanne/land/great-pine/great-pine.jpg

Can anyone tell me why there are two paintings with the same name?

Annick