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nes7827
05-17-2004, 01:35 AM
Hello all, just discovered this site. This painting was #14 in a series of about 25. 22 x 30 acrylic watercolor. Please visit my site if interested - there is a wide range of work shown. www.nicholassimmons.com

Aselka
05-17-2004, 01:51 AM
Wonderful work. Very interesting technique. I love your palette a lot and loose feeling, how you let paint flow, also your light handling!

I visited your website and enjoyed your art a lot. Thank you.

Aselka

laudesan
05-17-2004, 02:32 AM
Your website is interesting.

Your Koi is quite beautiful..

Europa
05-17-2004, 05:08 AM
Welcome to the forum - I feel as though I could just pick this fish up - look forward to seeing more of your work.

Pat

artmom
05-17-2004, 09:45 AM
Nicholas, welcome to the wild, wacky, wonderful world of the watercolor forum! :D

Lovely painting and interesting website.

However, I am a bit confused. :confused: Is the medium acrylic or watercolor? Are you using acrylics and painting in watercolor "style?" Do you realize we have an Acrylic Forum if you are using acrylics?

Lyn

NodakerDeb
05-17-2004, 09:54 AM
Nicholas,

Your work is magnificent!!! I have spent a lot of time at your website this a.m., and intend to visit there often.

Marquisina
05-17-2004, 07:45 PM
Welcome to wet canvas! This is a wonderful place!

I really enjoy this painting, and had to go check out your website..... wonderful! You do amazing work!

I'm glad you found us

Marqui

mirizar
05-17-2004, 09:13 PM
Nicholas: Your painting is just gorgeous! I like your style very much.

Michelle

nes7827
05-19-2004, 06:22 PM
Acrylic watercolor must be something new here. It is merely thinning acrylic paint with water....all of the techniques remain the same, though there are some advantages: 1) It is permanent - unlike normal wc, the paint won't lift or move after it's dry. There are no worries when rewetting. There have been times when this has been a slight hinderance, but overall I prefer this. 2) I use medium viscosity acrylic in the little bottles - much easier to handle than tubes of wc. 3) They are generally less expensive. Producing a lot of work on a large scale makes this a consideration. 4) Some brands such as Liquitex offer metallic and irridescent colors, which can be really cool. 5) It is widely recognized and accepted as watercolor by wc socieities, curators, galleries, etc.

www.nicholassimmons.com

pampe
05-19-2004, 08:02 PM
You might find that posting in the ACRYLICS FORUM also would be good


Most work in this forum is done in transparent watercolor


lovely koi

cdrane
05-19-2004, 08:03 PM
Acrylic watercolor must be something new here...

No, it's just not what the rest of us tend to talk about here on the watercolor forum - traditional watercolor paints (plus gouache). Technically, you're talking about acrylic painting. Hence all the questions you've been getting! :)

NodakerDeb
05-19-2004, 08:41 PM
Acrylic watercolor must be something new here. It is merely thinning acrylic paint with water....all of the techniques remain the same, though there are some advantages: 1) It is permanent - unlike normal wc, the paint won't lift or move after it's dry. There are no worries when rewetting. There have been times when this has been a slight hinderance, but overall I prefer this. 2) I use medium viscosity acrylic in the little bottles - much easier to handle than tubes of wc. 3) They are generally less expensive. Producing a lot of work on a large scale makes this a consideration. 4) Some brands such as Liquitex offer metallic and irridescent colors, which can be really cool. 5) It is widely recognized and accepted as watercolor by wc socieities, curators, galleries, etc.

www.nicholassimmons.com

Nicholas,

Thank you for clearing up the confusion.

I don't think of 'watered down' acrylics the same as transparent watercolors. I actually did a painting for my final project in my art class last semester using acrylics like watercolors... didn't work! There was no way to soften edges, nor let the paint do the composing.

The only similarities I see between acrylics and watercolors is that you can clean the brush up with water :) keeping in mind that you have to keep your acrylic brush IN water at all times you are working with it. I would never classify acrylics as a watercolor medium.

Now, having said that. I think anyone who can paint as well as you do in acrylics has my highest respect. I find it a very difficult medium, and am in awe of those who have mastered it.

Deb

artmom
05-19-2004, 09:12 PM
Thank you for answering my question.

Lyn

Alan Cross
05-19-2004, 09:31 PM
Nicholas,

Thank you for clearing up the confusion.

I don't think of 'watered down' acrylics the same as transparent watercolors. I actually did a painting for my final project in my art class last semester using acrylics like watercolors... didn't work! There was no way to soften edges, nor let the paint do the composing.

The only similarities I see between acrylics and watercolors is that you can clean the brush up with water :) keeping in mind that you have to keep your acrylic brush IN water at all times you are working with it. I would never classify acrylics as a watercolor medium.

Now, having said that. I think anyone who can paint as well as you do in acrylics has my highest respect. I find it a very difficult medium, and am in awe of those who have mastered it.

Deb

I agree with Deb watered down acrylic is not watercolor but you did get a nice effect I am sure it will be well liked it the acriylic forum....
Alan :)

Rod
05-19-2004, 10:10 PM
I have moved this thread to its correct forum of acrylics ,

Rod.

Rose Baggs
05-19-2004, 11:35 PM
Really gorgeous paintings on your website Nicholas! The Kois are my favorite...love your Acrylic "watercolor" technique. :)

nes7827
05-20-2004, 01:45 AM
thanks so much for the nice comments - this thread was moved without my consent to the acrylic forum. I've been trying to get across to the moderator that every single major watercolor society including the conservative and and tradition-minded American Watercolor Society deems "acrylic watercolor" acceptable by their standards. Many variations of watercolor, including gouache and acrylic wc are lumped together under "aquamedia" or "water-based media".......why this definition is good enough for these age-old institutions, but not a forum on Wet Canvas, is beyond me. My paintings are done precisely as "normal" watercolor - they are transparent, on paper, and presented under glass. Go figure. Since I am known as a watercolorist, it is my desire to participate in the watercolor forum, though my desire to participate at all is quickly waning. Thanks again for the message - NES www.nicholassimmons.com

surreal
05-20-2004, 01:46 AM
HI,
Welcome to the acrylics forum!
Your painting is very, very lovely!!!
:)

HRH Goldie
05-20-2004, 05:19 AM
Hi Nicholas, I love your painting of koi and loved your website gallery.
Try not to get too hung up on titles or classifications ;) It would be such a shame to stop posting. I'm sure you could slip in with technique and tips forum or many others.
I just had a 'conversation' on a forum last week with terriv and the fact that I had done a painting in 'watercolour technique' painting exactly koi carp.
He wanted to see it but can't find the painting (which was me experimenting) as it was on paper I think it was confined to a bin bag in the garage lol!
I hope he sees this as it is pretty much the same although I 'pooled' the three primary colours red, yellow, blue, in the background to signify light on water.
Please stay here at acrylics - we all use varied techniques but merely use the same materials to create ie acrylics. It is nice that different ways of using them are put together here and it acts as a springboard of ideas.
I hope to see many more paintings - why don't you post a wip? ;)
Hope to see you around well done. :clap:
Christine

rickymanchester
05-20-2004, 06:22 AM
It is a shame that your thread was moved without consent - I am a newbie to acrylics and this website... and so far much of what I have seen has been people telling me that Acrylics can't be used like Watercolours, and can't be used like Oils...

This is when it seems (to me ) that the rest of the world think they are the paint of the modern world for their versatility!!

It get's very confusing.

I loved your Watercolour style - and even if you do get to post in that forum again... we would still love to see the pictures here. It's great for me to see such good work, as it gives me something to aspire towards.

Regards

printzessofthenorth
05-20-2004, 09:10 AM
.....I don't think of 'watered down' acrylics the same as transparent watercolors. I actually did a painting for my final project in my art class last semester using acrylics like watercolors... didn't work! There was no way to soften edges, nor let the paint do the composing.
....Deb

Nicholas, I use acrylics in the watercolor manner and actually perfer it to using them in a thicker 'oil' style. I love your painting. It is exquisit! Can't wait to see more of your exquist work. Seems to me that the Water Color Forum will be missing out on some badly needed 'education' by acting so hastily on its prejudices.

"no way1 to soften edges, nor let the paint do the composing"!?! Deb, did you visit Nicolas' website? Check out "North by Northwest #2" or "Last September", or "Saint Andrew's by the Sea". There are also plenty of other examples on the site.

debbie




debbie

artistjan
05-20-2004, 10:23 AM
Nicholas I am very impressed with the effect of your technique. Sorry there are purists who won't accept you are a watercolorist, but there are still a lot of people who need to learn and understand acrylics are a valid medium AND are able to do just about anything you want them to.

Your paintings are superb and I for one would be very interested in learning about your techniques.

I'm glad your thread was moved - otherwise I would never have seen this ;)

scottb
05-20-2004, 11:22 AM
Just a point of clarification for everyone ... as I've received several emails on this (and no, please don't turn this into a debate, let's enjoy this amazing work of art instead!):

The medium specific forums (acrylic, watercolor, oil, etc.) are there to facilitate discussions on the "medium", not a particular "technique". While this piece is certainly done in the style/technique of a traditional watercolor, this thread belongs here in the acrylic forum. Why? Because first, it *is* done with acrylic paint (i.e. the medium in question). Second, and more importantly, because it demonstrates pushing the medium to the limits. This can be a powerful lesson to both novice and experienced artist alike.

BTW, we don't need anyone's consent to move threads. We move dozens of threads every day on this site, which is why these forums stay 99% spam free, and the information, for the most part, is highly organized and centrally located. :)

Cheers.
Scott

nes7827
05-20-2004, 12:57 PM
The standards by which organizations such as the American Watercolor Society, National Watercolor Society, Transparent Watercolor Society deem work as "watercolor" evidently do not apply here at Wet Canvas. Congratulations...

www.nicholassimmons.com

arlene
05-20-2004, 01:26 PM
The standards by which organizations such as the American Watercolor Society, National Watercolor Society, Transparent Watercolor Society deem work as "watercolor" evidently do not apply here at Wet Canvas. Congratulations...

www.nicholassimmons.com

the watercolor societies are interested in techniques using aquamedia...and i think they should

but as scott said, it's the medium that determines where it goes. and as said the medium in this case is acrylic

now i could do a watercolor looking painting in regular colored pencils (not watercolor pencils) and make it look just like a watercolor, but it would still be a colored pencil, and not a watercolor.

Personally, since your work is excellent, i'd love to see a demo on how you work...does it only work on paper? would it work on unprimed canvas? i'd also be interested in this technique and then using colored pencils on top...have you tried something like that?

CarlyHardy
05-20-2004, 08:23 PM
I've often used acrylics as an underpainting under my oil paintings watered down to the transparency of watercolor, but I've never pushed it to achieve the luminosity and depth of color that you have.

Was wondering if you use a varnish or medium over the work since acrylics usually dry a bit darker and duller?

carly

baquitania
05-20-2004, 09:17 PM
Nicolas:

My apologies to you for your thread being moved, unfortunately at this time, the policy for posting medium work dictates where it belongs. That said, there's no reason the terms for a new definition of what the Watercolor Forum considers to be inclusive cannot be defined by work such as yours...

The place to talk about that is in the Site Discussions Forum, perhaps a thread there talking about the merits of a subforum for all water based media would be the best place to start.

Your painting is quite amazing, and I liken it to Durer's work with changing "watercolors" into the semblance of "oils". I have dabbled a little in acrylic washes, and am eager to give it another shot after seeing this...

Earliar you offered to write an article for us, I believe that would be a great addition to the site as a whole... Please don't let this incident keep you from posting. Although you may not consider yourself a traditional acrylic painter, your work is more than welcome here...

Bobby

cdrane
05-21-2004, 11:54 AM
...Please don't let this incident keep you from posting. Although you may not consider yourself a traditional acrylic painter, your work is more than welcome here...

There was no 'incident' other than a new member with incredible work to show has confused the societal definition of watercolor with WetCanvas' definition-as-forum-categorization. And, FWIW, everyone wants Nicholas to participate in a way that is beyond plopping his work in a forum. There's been little discussion on his part, and no comments by him on other people's work. His work is so technically incredible that people are clamoring for his involvement in the proper context of WetCanvas which is ruled by the material, not the technique. He would be a welcome contributor in the Watercolor forums as a commentator and 'bridge builder' between mediums. We'll see if he follows through - I hope he does.

As a watercolorist, I remain intrigued by Nicholas' work but don't own a single tube of acrylic paint. If he stays around and does more than use WC as an extension of his website gallery, perhaps I'll give it a shot too!

Alison Jardine
05-21-2004, 12:00 PM
I see this as another example of how fabulously flexible acrylics are!

On the one hand, you have acrylics used in oil-manner, and no one can tell the difference;

on the other, you can use it in the finest watercolour manner, and no one can tell the difference....

Boy, this reminds me why I love acrylics!

Acrylics are the superior modern paint form!

Thanks for posting Nicholas!

nes7827
05-24-2004, 12:21 PM
Baquitania, I hope some of your ideas go into effect. I think the new moderator Phyllis is considering broadening the forum rules in some respects. Alison hit the nail on the head, and it seems there ought to be some recognition of the overlap in many techniques and mediums. Overall, a more open-minded approach benefits everyone.

artmom
05-24-2004, 03:28 PM
Nicholas, as a member of the Watercolor Forum, I admired your work, but wanted confirmation as to what YOU considered "acrylic watercolor." You did not see fit to answer me until I had asked three times.

Posting in the Acrylic forum, and posting a link in the Watercolor Forum would certainly give your work a much wider audience than confining it to one forum.

I will continue to view your very interesting work, no matter what medium or forum it is in!

Lyn

diane555
05-28-2004, 09:09 AM
Welcome to WC! Nicholas.
Regardless of where you post your work...you have a wonderful luminous style of painting and you are a welcome addition to any forum :) I hope to see more of your work. I enjoy seeing work that pushes the medium.

Di

Marty C
05-28-2004, 09:45 AM
Hi Nicholas,
A fine example of the incredible versatility of acrylics. They can appear as watercolour, they can appear as oils, they are generally under-rated and will become increasingly popular as the true merits of the medium become more apparent. Don't get hung up on classifications, join in with us here in extolling and showing the vitures of acrylics. With works such as yours, pretty soon folks will be taking up acrylics more and more.