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View Full Version : Photos: There's stuff on my beads! Arrrgghh!!!


StefaniBeads
05-16-2004, 01:11 PM
:mad: :mad: :mad:

Getting set up indoors (it's raining today, shoot...) and taking these photos took up a lot of time this morning, only to find out: There's lint and whatever on my beads! I'm SO mad, I really don't have time to deal with this, so I can forget about putting anything on ebay today. :(

I saw little bits of stuff on them before the pic taking and wiped them clean (ohhhh I thought!) with a piece of tissue. Wrong thing to do I guess, I've never made such a mess of them before. My vision was recently checked, is 20/30 for the lazy eye. Not bad for 38 yrs old, huh? But I can't see as good as my camera, that's for sure! :rolleyes:

Look at this mess. What can I do to clean my beads "lint, fluff, cat hair, etc." free for the camera's scrutinizing eye?! I know to never use tissue paper again, but I'm wondering, how do you all deal with this? Before today, I wiped them with a piece of t-shirt and got all obvious junk off of them. And the pics occasionally had to be taken over again when I missed a spot.

I'm curious to know what others do. Do you use a feather duster? LOL! :p ;) Any suggestions are greatly appreciated! :)

loco
05-16-2004, 01:20 PM
Lisa, Try cleaning them with coffee filters, there lint free!

StefaniBeads
05-16-2004, 01:24 PM
Lisa, Try cleaning them with coffee filters, there lint free!

Ahhh, thank you SO much for that! Now I remember, heehee! I swear it was Valorie who mentioned in a thread a long while back that this is what she uses! :D

Dale_M
05-16-2004, 02:08 PM
Stop by local LENSCRAFTERS or other "optical" store or camera shop and get lens cleanning tissues, yes tissues, ... Also some glasses cleaning fluid in those little spritz bottles....

Dale

PolychromeBeads
05-16-2004, 02:22 PM
You can get a lens cleaning cloth, too. Lasts longer than tissues. I also have cotton gloves I wear while photographing my beads - helps keep fingerprints off them.


Aimee
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Jan-2004/18777-jet.jpg

Emily
05-16-2004, 04:03 PM
If you choose a lens cleaning cloth rather than tissues or filters, put it away in a ziplock or something the minute after you clean off your beads. When I got out my lint-free cloth recently, I discovered that it was lint-free, all right, but it was far from cat hair free. (I don't know why I was surprised -- nothing else in my house is cat hair free.) I ended up using the lens cleaning tissues.

Camera stores also sell little rubber things that puff out air to clean lenses and such. I think I have one with a brush attached. If you have a particularly pesky piece of lint (or cat hair), you might try puffing at it with a can of the compressed air that they sell for cleaning electronic equipment.

Jinx.Garza
05-16-2004, 04:35 PM
I'm curious to know what others do. Do you use a feather duster? LOL! :p ;) Any suggestions are greatly appreciated! :)

I use Paint Shop Pro (Effects-->Noise-->Salt and Pepper Filter-->3/3). One click and the dust is gone!
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-May-2004/10250-Dscn2471r.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-May-2004/10250-Dscn2478r.jpg

Jinx

!ngridh
05-16-2004, 04:43 PM
thanks Jinx...I am going to try that ......looks great!

!ngridh
05-16-2004, 04:46 PM
Jinx...how about a before and after??? please

JavaGirlBT
05-16-2004, 05:00 PM
Wow, Jinx, that did the trick!

I was thinking maybe a swiffer cloth would pick up the lint - it's statically charged and doesn't leave a residue.

chrisdd
05-16-2004, 07:39 PM
I have a 20 year old box of photo wipes that I've been using on my rods. Sometimes it pays to be a packrat. :D

softbleu
05-16-2004, 08:22 PM
Windex wet wipes work wonders. Hey, an alliteration.


Christy

GlassMaus
05-17-2004, 05:13 PM
I'll preface my question with a note that I don't sell beads on ebay or any other online (or offline) venue. They're not good enough to sell yet :)

Please pardon me if this question offends anyone but doesn't retouching the photo of something that you're selling online dilute the buyer's right to see (as best one can) what they're getting?

I realize that only the dust was intentionally removed and there was no effort to disguise flaws in the lampworking (no flaws, the beads are gorgeous!). And I realize that if you say that the photo has been altered people will be less inclined to buy - what (or what else) did one "airbrush" out?

The idea of fixing the picture of something to be sold online makes me uncomfortable. I think I'm a reasonable person but I'm naive about these things. Is it common?

Thanks for your time and comments :)

Sarah

StefaniBeads
05-17-2004, 05:45 PM
I was thinking maybe a swiffer cloth would pick up the lint - it's statically charged and doesn't leave a residue.

That's exactly what I did! The Swiffer works great! I cleaned those sets up, took all the pics over again, and did manage to put them on ebay by yesterday afternoon. Must have looked okay, they're already gone BIN! ;)

But, my gosh! Jinx, I'm going to have to buy the PaintShop Pro! I had no idea you could get rid of cat hair and lint! My DD has been buggin' to get this software for a while. She had the PSP 8 free trial download on her screen name, so I can't get that, but it would be worth it to buy it. :)

StefaniBeads
05-17-2004, 06:04 PM
I'll preface my question with a note that I don't sell beads on ebay or any other online (or offline) venue. They're not good enough to sell yet :)

Please pardon me if this question offends anyone but doesn't retouching the photo of something that you're selling online dilute the buyer's right to see (as best one can) what they're getting?

I realize that only the dust was intentionally removed and there was no effort to disguise flaws in the lampworking (no flaws, the beads are gorgeous!). And I realize that if you say that the photo has been altered people will be less inclined to buy - what (or what else) did one "airbrush" out?

The idea of fixing the picture of something to be sold online makes me uncomfortable. I think I'm a reasonable person but I'm naive about these things. Is it common?

Thanks for your time and comments :)

Sarah

There was a thread on here a while back questioning whether a beadmaker had altered the color tones of a set of really glowing bright purple beads. It was believed that that may have been done. However, I do think that most of the beadmakers try their best when tweaking pictures to attain the most true to life color.

I think that most digital pics, no matter how much great lighting in your set up is available, you may have to lighten and adjust contrast of some images. My pics always turn out a little darker than I want, so I lighten them until they appear as they do in real life. Another feature I recently discovered, is the sharpening of images. Wow! What a difference that made! While my pics may be clear, there may be an ever so slight soft blur to them. Sharpen up and the highlights and reflections look more true to life too!

I believe as long as you are careful not to alter the natural true to life color of your art pieces for internet picture viewing, there's honesty in picture "tweaking" for quality images. That you're going to need to sell your items! You could have the most beautiful work, and a less than optimal photo will get you nowhere. Another thing - different computer monitors pick up certain hues differently too. Too bad there's nothing that can be done about that.

Buck Young
05-18-2004, 12:53 AM
Well...you have enough advice on how to clean up those beads. I just want to compliment you on a beautiful beads. Excellent work.

Buck

StefaniBeads
05-18-2004, 09:02 AM
Well...you have enough advice on how to clean up those beads. I just want to compliment you on a beautiful beads. Excellent work.

Buck

Thank you! :o

Emily
05-18-2004, 07:17 PM
Please pardon me if this question offends anyone but doesn't retouching the photo of something that you're selling online dilute the buyer's right to see (as best one can) what they're getting? . . . The idea of fixing the picture of something to be sold online makes me uncomfortable. I think I'm a reasonable person but I'm naive about these things. Is it common?

I'd say it's very common, but that people don't generally do it to disguise flaws in the beads. They do it to correct flaws in the pictures to make them look more like the beads do in real life. Some colors refuse to look right in pictures. Cobalt likes to show up in pictures as a really gorgeous shade of purple (one that unfortunately doesn't exist in Effetre), and ink blue comes out more cobalt than cobalt does, so truth in advertising really requires some tweaking of the image. When I'm messing with bead pictures, I usually take the beads up to my computer so I can look at them while I'm trying to get the color right.

If I were better with the camera, or maybe if I had a professional lighting set up, I might not need to lighten and sharpen the image, but I usually do. I don't think that's cheating. Again, it's done to make the image look more like the beads.

I guess editing the image to take out all of the cat hair might be cheating, because anything sent from my house is guaranteed to come with cat hair, try as I might to remove it.

I agree with you that editing out flaws in the beads would be a bad thing. I think even turning beads so that you photograph the good side can be cheating, if there's a major difference. I'm thinking about a set I bought once that looked lovely in the photo -- dark blues with a little bit of wispy white. When I got them, though, I discovered that the focal had a big splotch of yellow on one side that wasn't shown in the photo or described in the text of the auction. I don't know what the artist was thinking. It looked awful. Maybe she wasn't trying to hide the yellow on purpose, but I haven't bought anything from her since.