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dustmop
05-01-2004, 08:34 PM
Hi all,

I recently joined wet canvas. I pain in watercolors but there
are some aspects of it that I find frustrating. I'm also trying
to teach myself colored pencil which I like a great deal.
I bought a few tubes of acrylics to try however I was told
by someone that you can't wash your brushes in the sink or
empty any of the water down the drain. Since I live in an
apartment complex I would have to pay for any damage
done to the drain, also I don't want to put anything
toxic in the system. I'm wondering how others do
clean up.
Thank you for any responses,
Cathy

Enchanted
05-01-2004, 08:57 PM
I wouldn't worry about acrylics in the drain. It's oil paints that are the devil's nightmare in drains. Just be sure you don't wash any large dried solid pieces down the drain, use plenty of water for flushing, and you should experience no problems. It would, of course, be wise to get rid of as much leftover paint as possible in the garbage before using the sink.

Godzoned
05-01-2004, 11:30 PM
I wouldn't worry about acrylics in the drain. It's oil paints that are the devil's nightmare in drains. Just be sure you don't wash any large dried solid pieces down the drain, use plenty of water for flushing, and you should experience no problems. It would, of course, be wise to get rid of as much leftover paint as possible in the garbage before using the sink.

Totally agree with the above. Its oil paints that you have to watch out for.

dustmop
05-02-2004, 08:08 PM
Thank you for the responses to my question. I'm relieved
to know that I can at least wash my brushes in the sink.
If not in the sink then where? I had visions of my
trying to rinse them in little cups of water.
Thanks again,
Cathy

odge
05-03-2004, 10:25 PM
I have a supply of cheap toilet paper to clean my excess paint away. Then I'm only really washing the remnants down the drain. Hot water is really good for breaking up the paint, so if you are still worried, pour some boiling water down the drain after you've cleaned up.

Jo

artistodon
05-04-2004, 02:37 AM
I have been washing my brushes in the sink for years without any problems. You have nothing to worry about.
Don :)

ebandit
05-05-2004, 04:33 PM
The problems with washing brushes in the sink are mostly for people with septic systems instead of sewers. In septic systems the bits of acrylic can build up in the field lines and cause the septic tank to "back up" and overflow. I have a septic tank so I wash the brushes first in a bucket then in the sink ...the bucket gets a trip outside to be emptied. If I empty the bucket down the drain then I will clog the lines.

dustmop
05-06-2004, 06:51 AM
Thanks for more ideas. I've worked out a kind of system
borrowing from what's been said. I use the large paper
cups for water. At the end of painting I wipe of as
much paint as possible from the brushes with paper
towels and put the towels in the paper cups to soak
up the paint and water. Then I just throw it in the
trash. By the time I wash the brushes in the sink
they're already pretty clean. Then just in case
I run hot water down the drain, as suggested.
Thanks,
Cathy

Enchanted
05-06-2004, 11:20 AM
The problems with washing brushes in the sink are mostly for people with septic systems instead of sewers.

That septic systems take additional care is certainly true!

But even if you're hooked to a municipal sewer system, you need to be concerned with potential plugging of your sink's "U" trap, or whatever it's called. In schools where oil painting is allowed in studios, they usually have a specially designed "grease trap" or "oil trap" that gets maintenance every now and then to clean out the trapped oil residue - and whatever else gets flushed down the drain by students. Restaurants also must have a special grease trap on their drains for the same reasons.