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kbilltv
04-21-2004, 02:46 AM
My beautiful baby girl, I saw you today as a woman.

LadyAlba
04-21-2004, 02:58 AM
Kbilltv..........She is Beautiful!! What program did you use and how long did it take you to do it? The detail is amazing! :clap: :clap: :clap:

kbilltv
04-21-2004, 03:40 AM
Thank you Lady Alba. She is a beautiful woman all of a sudden.

PhotoshopCS, 8x10x150ppi, 5-6 hrs. reference:

Jet
04-21-2004, 04:56 AM
Whoaa, it looks like a photograph !

You used the photo as reference only ?
Maybe some color sampling ?
Damn, i'll never get to this level of proficiency !!, or,maybe if i live up to 100 and practice a lot. hskda........

Bill, when you have some time, would you do a stepper for us with this or other pic ?
I'll pass the bucket around to hire you for a couple of hours, OK? LOL

keep 'em flowing !!

Regards

kbilltv
04-21-2004, 05:23 AM
Thanks Jet. A few more adjustments and close enough to done.

flowerfancy58
04-21-2004, 02:02 PM
They do that to you Bill, turn around and they are all grown up:) She's a beautiful girl. I had to look twice, thought it was a photo, so there is great detail here, excellent!

gloria:)

pstewart
04-21-2004, 05:48 PM
:clap: Superb! I had to compare the original face shape etc. to the painted version to convince my eyes that you didn't just smudge over the photo itself. Excellent work!

As nearly perfect as this is, I'd like to see more sharpness/sparkle in the eyes.

Phyllis

kptad2
04-21-2004, 06:20 PM
i too thought it was a photo then i realize NOt Wow to me might be an understaement of the year.. Excellent excellent work you have done here.. :D :clap: :D :clap:

justjean
04-22-2004, 02:03 AM
WOW that is amazing work and the skin tones are wonderful, a beautiful painting of a beautiful girl :clap: :clap:

kbilltv
04-22-2004, 03:12 AM
Thank you all! She would be very proud, (and embarrassed).

dcorc
04-22-2004, 07:29 AM
Could you please tell us a little more about how you achieved this, please? Do you start off from blank or work in a layer above the ref? do you draw edges first or go straight in with colour - what pixel dimensions do you work ? do you sample colours in Photoshop or "eyeball it"?

In the oils forum we often post Work In Progress threads showing the stages that the painting goes through - it would be good to see a WIP for a painting like this.

Dave

kbilltv
04-22-2004, 12:31 PM
Could you please tell us a little more about how you achieved this, please? Do you start off from blank or work in a layer above the ref? do you draw edges first or go straight in with colour - what pixel dimensions do you work ? do you sample colours in Photoshop or "eyeball it"?

In the oils forum we often post Work In Progress threads showing the stages that the painting goes through - it would be good to see a WIP for a painting like this.

Dave

Sorry, I forgot I was dealing with artists here, inquiring minds that want to know. I had the photo open in a separate file, for visual reference and color sampling. I outlined her sketchily, and went at painting, using the airbrush in photoshop CS, and wacom. Final blending with the smudgy finger. Off hand I don't recall the pixel dimensions, but the print-size is 8 x 10" x 150ppi. I will try to remember to save steps for a process demo with the next one.

I detailed the eyes a little further, thanks for pointing that out, PStewart. Ithink I need to spend a little more time on them, even think I have (her) left eye a little too low on her face. Trying not to over work this.

dcorc
04-22-2004, 12:46 PM
Do you work in layers in PS, or is it all in one layer? Did you start with this toned background colour?

In oils we often start with a grayscale "griseille" or greenish "verdacchio" underpainting to get placements and tonal values, and then overpaint in colours, opaque, semiopaque or transparently.

Dave

kbilltv
04-22-2004, 10:11 PM
Do you work in layers in PS, or is it all in one layer? Did you start with this toned background colour?

In oils we often start with a grayscale "griseille" or greenish "verdacchio" underpainting to get placements and tonal values, and then overpaint in colours, opaque, semiopaque or transparently.

Dave

Oh yea, I always work in layers. When one layer is 'almost right' I move to a new one so I don't mess up what I already have. Then when moving to hair, clothes, et al, they get new layers too. The background stays on a separate layer, forever. I duplicate the file and flatten it for printing or jpegging, keeping a layered "master copy" for future changeability. I merge all the layers of the 'subject' and finalize the blending and details.

I like to work from dark to light, so I put down a darker-than value in a given area and work it up to it's highlights.

That's interesting that you would use grayscales in oils, why not values of the intended final hue? Is the gray "bled" into the final applications giving a unifying factor to the piece as a whole?

dcorc
04-22-2004, 11:16 PM
Oh yea, I always work in layers. When one layer is 'almost right' I move to a new one so I don't mess up what I already have. Then when moving to hair, clothes, et al, they get new layers too. The background stays on a separate layer, forever. I duplicate the file and flatten it for printing or jpegging, keeping a layered "master copy" for future changeability. I merge all the layers of the 'subject' and finalize the blending and details.

I like to work from dark to light, so I put down a darker-than value in a given area and work it up to it's highlights.

That's interesting that you would use grayscales in oils, why not values of the intended final hue? Is the gray "bled" into the final applications giving a unifying factor to the piece as a whole?

These are all very oil-like techniques - you could divide painting in oils into a few broad groupings - not mutually exclusive, they can all be combined -

painted more or less directly as the final colour - usuallly in one sitting

painted more or less directly as the final colour with some layering and refinement over several sittings, with some degree of working from darks to lights

greyscale underpainting for values, and opaque overpainting - here the underpainting is used to work out brightess values - this can help in refining the drawing and establishing correct contrast before overpainting with hues of the same brightness value

underpainting in greyscale, or with greenish or brownish tones, plus overpainting as transparent or semitransparent glazes - here the underpainting is usually painted a value or two light, as glazes will bring the values down, but allows jewel-like colours as the light penetrates into the paint surface and bounces back out again.

If you have a look in the Oils and Classical forums there are many detailed discussions of these techniques - particularly see the Master of the Month and WIP threads in Oils, and WIP threads such as the Bouguereau "Cupid & Psyche" copy, and "Analyse This" threads in Classical.

Many of these approaches can be applied digitally.

Dave

broken pencil
04-23-2004, 01:53 AM
i like what you did with the eyes and mouth to brighten her expression up but i don't know why you copied the unflattering affects of the flash - horrible pastey skintones and that harsh shadow cutting its way down her body?

kbilltv
04-23-2004, 03:24 AM
Thanks Dave. That was good stuff. Techniques overlap. I'm thinking of becoming a famous oil painter someday, when I can relax a little. I'm a working artist, dependent on digital for end use and company file sharing. But, having been accepted into the famous artists school of art, on the basis of my "extraoardinary" rendering of Winky, I have hopes of retiring to famous artist status. Yea, it could be pie in the sky, but a man must dream.

Regarding earlier comments (probably an other thread, but still relevant) about the digital experience: I do think my succesess have been due to the successes I've been able to achieve with digital help. Yes, "Help". I've been able to do more since I went digital. And if learning is factored to experience, and experience has been multiplied divisionally by time... And, I only drink instant coffee, heated in the microwave, which therefore negatively offsets time, with what may seem inconsequential incrementally measures, but adds/subtracts from the whole exponentially and diametrically, the digitalist process has undeniably enhanced my personal progress.

kbilltv
04-23-2004, 03:46 AM
i like what you did with the eyes and mouth to brighten her expression up but i don't know why you copied the unflattering affects of the flash - horrible pastey skintones and that harsh shadow cutting its way down her body?

"Pasty skintones", "Horrible" "unflattering", and "harsh shadows" on my painting of my daughter??? I always take criticism seriously, as seriously as the author shows me of their ability/credibilty. So, I immediately did a "find threads started by" "you", and checked out your work. All of it.

You crack me up.

broken pencil
04-23-2004, 12:45 PM
my ability/credibility is moot. i'm sorry if i offended you but ad hominem attacks do not make my question any less answerable.

if you do not regard the skin tones and flash shadow as unflattering then that's fine by me. if you like what you see then paint it, just don't paint what you see because it's there.

i'm not sticking round for a fight.

good luck.

JulieBoyles
04-23-2004, 05:20 PM
This is a very wonderful portrait kbill!! :clap: :clap: I appreciate you sharing it with us and some of your process also. It helps to know someone else saves a layer as a back up just in case! :D I hope you'll show us more portraits in the future!

Congrats,
Julie

themanda
04-23-2004, 06:41 PM
this is incredible work, and your daughter is just lovely! both of you should be very proud.

kbilltv
04-25-2004, 12:35 AM
Thank you two! Julie, sometimes I'll even start a new file, to be extra safe.

Chiers
04-25-2004, 11:41 AM
kbill I could have sworn that I replied on this thread the other day but I don't see me here so I guess not. YOur portrait of your daughter is fantastic. Great realizm. And your daughter is a beauty!

And, I only drink instant coffee, heated in the microwave,

Me too, ever try Kava?

digistyle
04-25-2004, 04:54 PM
WOW! This is a nice piece of work! I'd like to see the background worked more to soften the image a bit, but that's just a personal preference. Great work!

digistyle

amouse
04-26-2004, 01:33 AM
Your daughter is beautiful and the painting is fantastic it looks just like a photograph :)